Message Boards

Guidelines

  • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
  • No off-topic or off-color postings.
  • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of HGTV Moderators.
  • No advertising is allowed.
  • Be Nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by HGTV.
  • For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.
Full Guidelines

  HGTV.com
  HGTV Message Boards
Hop To Forum Categories   Real Estate
Hop To Forums   Buying & Selling Homes
  Selling House with Vegetable Garden
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Selling House with Vegetable Garden Sign In/Join 
posted
I have a series of raised beds for vegetable gardening. Every year I plant a garden for food. (I'm pretty good at it and this is not a messy garden)

We are getting ready to put the house on the market- So I know I probably won't be here when some of the vegetables are ready to harvest. But there are many that I could harvest while the house is on the market.

If I don't plant anything, there would be a bunch of raised bed boxes that I'd still have to work on weed control.

So- It's that time of year when I'll be planting my garden. Should I go ahead and plant it as planned, eat from it while I'm here, hope it will be a selling feature?

(quite honestly, when it comes to buying at the other end, I'll be asking my realtor to look for properties suitable for gardening- so there have to be buyers out there who like gardens, right?)

What modifications, if any, would you suggest for the vegetable garden?
 
Posts: 6104 | Registered: Jul 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Just to be clear- since I don't know how long it will take to sell the house, and I will be here at least until July- I know I can utilize the vegetable garden. It would not just be for "show".
 
Posts: 6104 | Registered: Jul 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Jewel
posted Hide Post
So that you're not obligating a buyer (and thus limiting your buyer pool) to weed, harvest, or clean out your raised beds after closing, I suggest you plant just one (maybe two) of the beds this spring. Then, cover the soil in the other beds with a thick layer of mulch for a clean appearance (and to keep weeds from sprouting).
 
Posts: 8201 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
What would make you happy? As a buyer it would make no difference to me..... Well, probably. I would be concerned it there were extensive water features, etc in a landscape that I would have to dismantle because that is something I am no longer able to do myself and would have to hire someone.

If you have raised beds ( wooden, brick, stone??) that are most of your yard you may want to do something. Otherwise, most people are going to think they are a better gardener than you anyway Smile .
 
Posts: 7311 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
If left untended, vegetable gardens can quickly turn into unkempt masses of leggy plants. IMHO, many buyers, including gardeners, would consider them another unfinished project to deal with if/when they purchased the property.

I suggest you plant whatever beds you need with early season plants and remove everything before you move, leaving all the beds mulched and ready for the buyer to use (or not) if they wish.

All, IMHO.
 
Posts: 168 | Registered: Sep 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Personally, I would plant whatever you want to plant in as many rows in the raised beds as you want since you will be there through July as long you they are keep immaculate - no weeds, ect.

Don't live your life dependent on speculations about potential buyers wishes, whims, likes or dislikes. Besides, your daughter and her DH will be there to maintain the beds, right or not? You haven't posted back on that situation yet....
 
Posts: 6492 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
This is another staging question, IMHO. The purpose of staging is to present your home so as to appeal to the greatest number of potential buyers. In addition, staging (hopefully) helps sellers maximize their sales price and reduces the days on market.

If you enjoy your early-season vegetable garden and then leave the beds cleared and mulched, you'll appeal to both gardeners and non-gardeners, alike - again, IMHO. Gardeners can plant what they prefer and non-gardeners won't consider that area another immediate maintenance issue for the home.

It's obviously up to each individual seller to determine how much they care to stage their home.

Good Luck!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: BearCat49,
 
Posts: 168 | Registered: Sep 21, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of real estate lady
posted Hide Post
Plant flowera instead to capture mass of buyer appeal, and stay focused on yard and curb appeal. Sign buyers who like the outside are usually half sold!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: real estate lady,
 
Posts: 9317 | Registered: Aug 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
thanks for the feedback. When we get to hiring a realtor, I'll make sure to get their take on things as far as what buyers here might want. Meanwhile, if we could just get it to stop snowing I could actually start planting the garden, if only for the late Spring/early Summer and my own family's benefit.

As for my daughter- she's on a search for her own place to live, and we will just have to wait and see how things play out. She may or may not be here beyond when I plan on moving, depending on many different factors.
 
Posts: 6104 | Registered: Jul 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
On another board, a young couple just bought a house with a garden & green house. They are tickled pink even though the green house needs some work as the owners were elderly and hadn't kept it up as well the last few years.
They couldn't believe how lucky they were to find something in their price range that had an established veggie garden area.

Was it me, I would plant as normal & use like normal too. If the new owners don't want it you can always pull it out & mulch it before you leave or knock a few bucks off if they do it.
You can't eat flowers and the food you grow is healthier than what is in the stores.
There are now more & more people raising their own veggies, that is one of the main reasons I would plant as normal!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5146 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rubyruby
posted Hide Post
I have a whole side of a terraced yard that I put my garden in. I am constantly slapping my wrist for buying anything at this time. Yes, there are weeds it it now...but I've weedwacked it very low and I've sprayed weed killer and I've done some weeding. It also has a couple thornless blackberry bushes there....but for me, no...I don't have time to work, keep the house clean...and tend to my garden right now. I am on the market 3 weeks. But It is killing me to not have my garden going. Frown good luck...Oh and totally agree with GAkaren! she's dead on. I wouldn't even pull it up. If I had tons of tomatoes in my garden, I would think it would get people kinda excited about the space in general! Homesteading is a huge thing for many people right now. Especially in my little country town. Everybody has a garden!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: rubyruby,


"In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt"
 
Posts: 1180 | Location: Houston, Tx Zone 9 | Registered: Jul 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Yep, I'd totally plant the garden, too. To me, it's a selling point. If you will move before the house is actually sold (will you?), you can always hire someone to come maintain the garden until the house does sell.
 
Posts: 6090 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I don't know why I was so worried about the garden. We have a foot of snow covering the yard!

Of course, the snow will melt. Eventually. Right???
 
Posts: 6104 | Registered: Jul 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
It may not seem like it now, but yes, it will eventually thaw. Winter will come to an end. Smile
 
Posts: 7311 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
If it were me I'd go ahead and plant my garden because you have no clue how long you're going to be there.
 
Posts: 1118 | Location: North Carolina Close to Charlotte | Registered: Apr 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Had the first of two CMAs (arranged through the relocation company). The market here has really picked up, and the realtor we spoke to said that she'd advise planting the garden, but modifying it so that there is more color and interest- and I can do that. Though, to be honest, we still haven't seen the last of the snow. There are some things I could plant now, as long as we don't have a hard freeze. But this April has been downright weird!
 
Posts: 6104 | Registered: Jul 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Tomatoqueen:
I have a series of raised beds for vegetable gardening. Every year I plant a garden for food. (I'm pretty good at it and this is not a messy garden)

We are getting ready to put the house on the market- So I know I probably won't be here when some of the vegetables are ready to harvest. But there are many that I could harvest while the house is on the market.

If I don't plant anything, there would be a bunch of raised bed boxes that I'd still have to work on weed control.

So- It's that time of year when I'll be planting my garden. Should I go ahead and plant it as planned, eat from it while I'm here, hope it will be a selling feature?

(quite honestly, when it comes to buying at the other end, I'll be asking my realtor to look for properties suitable for gardening- so there have to be buyers out there who like gardens, right?)

What modifications, if any, would you suggest for the vegetable garden?


Sure, there are many people who are fond of gardening and who would like to buy your house. For example, when we were choosing our house, my mother wanted with a garden one because she likes to spend there her free time, to plat fruit and vegetables for the whole family.
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: Nov 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

HGTV.com    HGTV Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Real Estate  Hop To Forums  Buying & Selling Homes    Selling House with Vegetable Garden