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Picture of KG in CA
posted
You helped me in the past when I had knob & tube questions. Now another DS is looking to buy a home & the one he is interested in, in the Bay area, was built in 1955 and has recently been "flipped". It shows very well now. I said he should know about the plumbing, electrical, and the roof for sure. What else should he look into in a home of this age??? I know there will be an inspection, but I think he should look into potentially very large problems before he takes ANY steps. Thanks!!!


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Posts: 7548 | Location: Highland, CA Zone 9b  | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rker321
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If you are familiar with the Program Holmes Inspection, you will know that flippers usually tend to do what he calls lipstic and mascara, updates in order to sell that house. Not only I would have an electrician take a look at that property but also a plumber. besides all of those things that you have mentioned. Many times an inspector cannot see what is behind the walls. in a home that old you really need more than just an inspection.
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: 0 | Registered: May 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of pinecone476
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I agree with rker321. If it has been "flipped" check to see what permits were pulled. Happy house hunting.

piney
 
Posts: 3242 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KG in CA
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Will a RE agent have access to details on electrical, plumbing, foundation inspections, etc, once my DS starts speaking to one? I believe the property is owned by an agent. Am I allowed to link the listing here?


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Posts: 7548 | Location: Highland, CA Zone 9b  | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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They will know what they are told or what is in the disclosure statement IF you want to believe them. I would not. It is up to the buyer to check things out.

But there are somethings you can do when you look at a home even briefly. Look under the sink for water stains. Are there squeaks in the floor. Does anything feel unlevel?

Someof this may not be a problem, just helps to narrow down the houses when you are looking.
 
Posts: 7288 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of real estate lady
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MAKE SURE YOU HAVE "CONTINGENT UPON BUYERS APPROVAL OF HOME INSPECTION" IN THE CONTRACT.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: real estate lady,
 
Posts: 9313 | Registered: Aug 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rker321
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Again, a 1955 home needs a lot more than just an inspection. and any Realtor will only know what the owners will tell them.
This could become a money pit full of issues if you are not careful. Get all your ducks in a row, and hire people besides an inspector that will tell you, what other problems the house may have that you or anyone can not see.
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: 0 | Registered: May 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KG in CA
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Thank you for your responses! I learned a lot during DS#1's search, and so did he! The suggestions on 2 boards here gave him direction, and he now has owned a 1920's home for over a year.

This new home search brings DS#2 30 years forward in the age of the homes because, in the Bay area, that is where his bottom line falls. So he and his wife have a good idea now of what they are in for. Thank you for helping this Mom, in her moments of panic, who cannot be there to assess the situation in person. DS commented that there is not much out there to look into. I suggested that more homes will likely be listed in April/May closer to the end of the school year. We'll see......


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Posts: 7548 | Location: Highland, CA Zone 9b  | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You will probably pay less for an older home. Of course, this may depend on its condition and location of the home. Generally, a modern house of the same size and in the same area is more expensive than an older one.

Fast House Sale
House Cash Buyers
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Mar 17, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rker321
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I believe that it depends on how savvy the buyer happens to be.
There are many new homes that I wouldn't bother buying, due to the shoddy construction. Many developers simply build with"just up to code" in those homes, making them as lasting, as your entire mortgage And then, probably major repairs need to be done.
Now, when it comes to older homes. if I was a new buyer, I would not entertain that idea unless I had help.
Many only see the cosmetics in a house, and don't know how to look for the bones in a home.
An older home has issues that newer homes don't have. Therefore, I would not only have an inspection, which only would see the obvious, but not what it is inside those walls. But I would hire electricians, plumbers and contractors to actually evaluate that house.
If you don't want to have those expenditures, then by all means, be ready to find out later issues that you were not counting on having.

]
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: 0 | Registered: May 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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rker - If you can get the seller to accept that as part of the offer process and you can spell out exactly what will kill the deal plus you are willing to spend big bucks for the various inspections - then go for it. But, buying an older home it will have its quirks and issues with items that would not meet code today but were standard when the home was built.

Too many builders today do not build a quality product, usually, you get what you pay for. However, you can expect the builder to at least meet code. At least today there are codes.

(I still recommend a home inspection, even for new construction. Mistakes happen even with good builders.)


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3606 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rker321
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If the seller accepts an inspection. and I go and find that the home was wired without a permit. The seller will have to make a decision as to whether to fix it or not or to negotiate a price.
What I mentioned was, what I would do, if I were to buy an older home. and I will also based on what I found would retract my offer or not. It would depend on many variants on whether I would want to spend the money or not. simply mentioning that many first time buyers don't know how to look for issues in older homes. and think that an inspection would cover all their problems.
 
Posts: 5014 | Location: 0 | Registered: May 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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You have gotten very good advice here but I want to extend some reassurances about buying an older home. We have lived in our 1905 house for 43 years and have had no major surprises or catastrophes. Still using the original coal burning furnace converted long ago to oil.

Roof has needed replacing but all plaster walls and ceilings are still intact. I would always hire a building inspection either as seller or buyer and there is only so much you can do to protect yourselves, but it is not always a negative thing to buy an older house. In fact I know people whose much more recently built houses have had many more problems.
 
Posts: 13082 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of real estate lady
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Personally, I think homes built back in the 50's are built better than today.
 
Posts: 9313 | Registered: Aug 14, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KG in CA
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I do not know where he obtained details from, but apparently there were previous reports which had DS deciding to pass on this home. He has successfully made an offer on another...and that one has a better outlook in spite of red tape involved there too. Thanks!


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Posts: 7548 | Location: Highland, CA Zone 9b  | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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