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  Stage a home or completely move out???
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Stage a home or completely move out??? Sign In/Join 
Picture of brynnsmom
posted
We completely moved out of our home to redo all hardwood floors and complete painting of everything. We want to sell our home but wonder if it's better not to move back in. What sells better? Empty or lived in?
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rker321
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It depends on who looks at your home. I rather see an empty house, that way, I really can see if my own furniture would fit, really concentrated of walls window floors and not get distracted by someone's furniture.
Others want to see a stage house, I guess it helps them.
 
Posts: 5009 | Location: 0 | Registered: May 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of brynnsmom
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Thanks so much for your input! We haven't sold a home in years and just really torn on what to do!
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: Jan 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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I'd talk with your real estate agent. If you are in temporary housing or your new house moving back will be an expense. You might be better off getting rental furniture to stage the house and not live there if it is needed in your area.

A friend just sold her house in my neighborhood completely empty in 3 days. She priced it right and everything looked good. If a house is over-priced in our neighborhood it doesn't matter if if is furnished or not, it won't sell at a price above the norm for our neighborhood.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6958 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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It may surprise you that many realtors state that a home sells better if it is furnished. That does not mean cluttered, soiled, personalized, or shabby. In fact, if furniture is placed well, a perspective buyer can in vision their furnishings fitting in.

On a personal note I recently made an amazing observation. A friend recently had her spacious kitchen gutted in prep for a remodel. In fact, soffits were removed also which elevated the ceiling. In spite of all this, she and I agreed that the space looked SMALLER. when her kitchen was complete including an enlarged island, the space looked huge. I have others since who expressed similar observations. Point is, when furnished there is less guessing if say your king size bed, two dressers, nightstands and chair or chaise will fit into a bedroom.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Froo Froo,
 
Posts: 18698 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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BTW, close friends who happen to be agents, are placing their home on the market. They donated excess clutter and stored much of their furniture while sparingly furnishing their rooms so as to suggest how a space can be furnished and/or ID the purpose of the space all while still residing there and presenting a clean, uncluttered appearance for showings.
 
Posts: 18698 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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quote:
Originally posted by Froo Froo:
It may surprise you that many realtors state that a home sells better if it is furnished. That does not mean cluttered, soiled, personalized, or shabby. In fact, if furniture is placed well, a perspective buyer can in vision their furnishings fitting in.

On a personal note I recently made an amazing observation. A friend recently had her spacious kitchen gutted in prep for a remodel. In fact, soffits were removed also which elevated the ceiling. In spite of all this, she and I agreed that the space looked SMALLER. when her kitchen was complete including an enlarged island, the space looked huge. I have others since who expressed similar observations. Point is, when furnished there is less guessing if say your king size bed, two dressers, nightstands and chair or chaise will fit into a bedroom.


Walking through houses under construction I am often amazed at how small they seem even though they are really quite large. In some instances it does take furniture to show off the rooms to their full advantage.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3564 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Statistically in RE, I believe nicely staged homes sell better (higher **$) and faster than vacant homes. As a professional, I can envision the space and often enjoy touring vacant homes. That said, most buyers, IMHO, benefit from staging.

Here's another consideration that I didn't see mentioned above. Some buyers and their realtors, even if you've staged appropriately, will check the closets and notice that you've moved out. They'll use your vacancy (or attempt to, anyway) as a bargaining chip and may reduce their offers accordingly, assuming that you need the capital for your next home/project.

And, the occupied home is easier to maintain and keep clean/prepared for showings. Plus the added cost of maintaining add'l residences -


Good Luck!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SurfNow,
 
Posts: 518 | Registered: Aug 29, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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