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watermelon pepermonia Sign In/Join 
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
posted
Can anyone tell me how to care for this plant? My sister gave this plant to me, cause she was tired of it. It's an interesting plant, but I don't have the vaguest idea how to take care of it. This morniing I took it outside and turned it upside down to see if it was pot bound and most of it's leaves fell off.
What did I do?? H E L P !!!!!!
 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mgt
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It's a cool plant...found this for you:
Light

Grow watermelon peperomias in bright, indirect light, such as an east- or west-facing window. Move them away from the window indoors to avoid direct exposure to sunlight during the summer months but keep them in bright light or the variegated, watermelon-like stripes on the leaves will fade. If you move them outdoors for the summer months, grow them in the shade.


Water

Allow the soil of potted peperomias to dry out between waterings and then water well, until the soil is thoroughly drenched. Keeping potted peperomias too moist can cause root or stem rot, as well as a non-parasitic disease called oedema, which makes raised, cork-like swellings on the bottoms of the leaves.

Fertilizer

Fertilize peperomias sparingly, as they prefer soil that is not overly fertile. Feed them once every six months with regular houseplant fertilizer mixed at half the strength recommended by the manufacturer. Overfeeding peperomias can cause excessive growth.


Cultivation Notes



Keep peperomias growing slightly potbound, as they like to be crowded in their pots. They also make excellent additions to terrariums or dish gardens. Peperomias are easy to propagate with cuttings; the leaves form roots when taken as petiole cuttings.



Read more: http://www.ehow.com/info_85527...e.html#ixzz2iwpumGLY"

Enjoy, good luck. Smile


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I've decided to quit my job, drop out of society, and wear live animals as hats."
 
Posts: 7849 | Location: Black Creek, WI Zone 5 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of vera ellen
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Wow, good advice from mgt.......all I knew was that it was a houseplant and needed indirect light. They are pretty plants, I knew that too Smile.

As for the leaves falling off, it should recover once you repot it...it was probably in shock from the move.

ve
 
Posts: 3658 | Location: southern middle Tennessee | Registered: May 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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thank you, mgt and vera ellen. i read this same article. I always read as much as I can on google before I come to the end of my rope. My sister gave me this plant several months ago. I wanted to check it to see if it needed to be repotted, this morning and ALL of it's leaves fell off. Not a few, but all of them. It was kinda droopy, so i watered it a little. I watered it just a little yesterday and it perked right up. I have attached a pic of it as it looks right now.

 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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Here's another view. I told you it lost EVERY leaf it had and that was just from being turned upside down in it's pot. I was going to look at the roots, but it kinda scared me when all the leaves fell off.

It looks like it would make a great bonsai plant!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Barb in Mississippi,

 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mgt
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Oh, my goodness! Do you think it's worth trying to save? If so, work on one of those stems at a time. Cut it back (clean clippers) to a spot of new growth. If it starts to sprout more from there, then go ahead & cut back the other stems, too. Maybe, leave one tall, one, medium & one short, near the soil & see what happens. Good luck.


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I've decided to quit my job, drop out of society, and wear live animals as hats."
 
Posts: 7849 | Location: Black Creek, WI Zone 5 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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I definitely think it's worth saving! This could be a really NEAT experiment!
I'll try it mgt.
 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of amaryllis6
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Its still alive, it has new growth. Probably lost its leaves because it was moved to a new home.
 
Posts: 1379 | Location: coast of Louisiana zone 9 | Registered: Mar 10, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of bana
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it does have new growth. i'd cut it back to just above the sprouting leaves and don't overwater it. i don't think turning it upside down caused the leaves to fall if they weren't ready to drop of their own accord. good luck and don't give up on it.
 
Posts: 3884 | Location: Northern CA Zone 10a | Registered: Aug 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
posted Hide Post
i'm not about to give up on this plant! i really like just the stems.
i tried pruning it some and the new leaves fell off.
i've never had a plant that didn't drop it's leaves within a month, so having the plant for several months and then it dropped ALL of it's leaves, has me baffled. i'm thinking that maybe it's going dormant, for the winter.
 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I've hesitated to join this discussion, because it's been many years since the watermelon peperomia I had has bit the dust. The ol' memory isn't what it could be about subject matter from that long ago, you know. But I remember discovering at the time that excessive watering might have been the culprit. Peperomias are subject to stem rot if watered too often or if kept too soggy. They like humidity, but don't like their feet too wet.

I found a good article with care and feeding tips, if you think it could help:
"Growing Conditions
Watermelon peperomia is well suited for planting in containers or hanging baskets. Drainage is critical, so make sure the container has a drainage hole in the bottom. Peperomia grows in any good-quality, regular commercial potting soil or a homemade mixture containing ingredients such as compost, loam or peat moss. A handful of sand or vermiculite promotes drainage.

Sun
Watermelon peperomia thrives in bright, indirect sunlight. Although most types of peperomia thrive in bright light, too much light fades the bright colors of the variegated foliage. Indoors, a window with an eastern exposure provides excellent light. Outdoors, grow the plant in light shade or filtered light.

Water
Watermelon peperomia is a tropical plant that prefers humid conditions but is prone to stem rot in soggy soil. Water the plant deeply when the top of the soil feels slightly dry. Let the pot drain completely and never allow the plant to stand in water. Check outdoor plants daily during warm weather. In fall and winter, water sparingly and allow more time between each watering so the soil has time to dry a bit more than usual. If the air is dry in summer, increase humidity by setting the container on a humidity tray -- a tray with a layer of wet pebbles.

Temperature
Watermelon peperomia does not tolerate freezing temperatures. If you take your plant outdoors during warm weather, bring it in as soon as nighttime temperatures drop to 60 to 65 F. Ideal temperatures for the plant are 85 F during the day and the low 60s F at night. Although the plant tolerates cooler weather, it will drop its leaves when temperatures drop below 50 F.

Fertilizer
Watermelon peperomia is a light feeder and too many nutrients may cause excessive growth and a leggy, spindly plant instead of a compact, bushy plant. Fertilize the plant once a month during spring and summer, using a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer. Avoid granular fertilizers, which are too strong and may scorch the plant."
 
Posts: 4624 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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Thanks, nettiejay. Not sure, but think i've read this article before posting. I just want to make sure that I'm not gonna kill it. I know about the water, light and temp. It did great out on the covered porch during the late spring and summer months. I now have it in a north window. It gets indirect light and that's the brightest window I have. Not sure what it's doing so far, but it seems to be holding it's own.
 
Posts: 3231 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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