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  Warming up the ground
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posted
I'd like to try to warm the ground, especially now that this week is forecast to be warm with temps in the 60s daytime. I plan to plan onions within 2-4 weeks.

I have a green cloth designed to protect plants from the cold, plus some old black sheets.

Do I just lay it on the ground or could I lay it on about a foot over the ground--I have stakes to hold it above the ground.

Should I wait till later in the week when it's warmest?

Thanks


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Posts: 254 | Location: Nashville Music City USA | Registered: Dec 28, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Kosh, I can't answer as I'm in a colder zone. Hopefully vera or someone else down south will see this and answer you.
 
Posts: 952 | Registered: Aug 27, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of muddyshoes
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Never heard of this...sounds like out of the Bible. LOL Divine Intervention? Warming the ground? :>) Just kidding~~ I get it. Plastic
tents? I'll be doing that into June.


"Those that throw mud, lose ground!" :>)
 
Posts: 13165 | Registered: Apr 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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You need sheet plastic to warm up the soil. It won't work very well if there is snow on the ground. If you have sandy soil it will warm up faster than heavy clay soil.

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts...MG/VegFruit/when.htm

Oops - forgot to answer the second part of your question. Lay it directly on the soil and anchor it. When the sun hits the clear or black sheets of plastic the heat will heat up the plastic and transfer that heat to the soil.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: still tryin,
 
Posts: 2656 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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This link is for soil solarization, which isn't what you are attempting, but the information on the site is still useful regarding warming the soil.


http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74145.html
 
Posts: 2656 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of muddyshoes
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Sure, never read about this in these terms.


"Those that throw mud, lose ground!" :>)
 
Posts: 13165 | Registered: Apr 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There have been numerous articles about warming soil over the last 30, or so, years that involve placing plastic sheeting (clear works best) over the soil you want to warm up. Doing this can allow planting up to 3 weeks earlier then normal.
http://uniquegardencentre.com/...ets/Warming_Soil.pdf


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of vera ellen
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Kosh, you're in Nashville, right? Onions are a cool weather crop...so unless your ground is frozen, I don't think you need to warm up the soil. Why not just direct plant? Around here people will be planting onions, potatoes and cabbages by the end of the month or at least the first week of March. I understand that you are about an hour and a half away and that the climate is a wee bit different,but that shouldn't matter with a cool weather crop. Repeat, unless your soil is frozen, personally, I think warming the soil is unnecessary. Just my opinion.

ve
 
Posts: 3733 | Location: southern middle Tennessee | Registered: May 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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I agree w/VE.
I'm a lot further south than either of you but we plant our onions in Nov.-Dec. down here & I've had cabbages, broccoli & peas growing all winter. Our cold did kill my cauliflower and damaged my snap peas to the point that I will pull them & I'll replant the snap peas in a few days.
I have one head of cabbage about ready to harvest and others coming on and I have more in my garden house that will get set out very soon also!
My carrots haven't done that well in their new location...so I'll plant more back in their normal area along with more radishes.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5125 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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