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posted
Ok we're thinking of getting me a riding mower. No clue what kind to get. Could I have some feed back from those of you that have them?
It doesn't have to be a super big one. The back is 100X90' front is 100'wide not sure how deep. I'll be the one using it. DH isn't able. I'm short (yes Karen I admit it Smile)
Don't need a zero clearance? one.
Thanks.


Carlene
 
Posts: 1814 | Location: NE.Ok zone 6b | Registered: Oct 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Something's to check when you are looking. Be sure the seat is adjustable and that you can sit comfortably with the steering wheel while you have the pedal fully depressed (on most machines that is the brake, an important element!). I am short too and sometimes it feels too close to the steering wheel to get comfortably on and off.

Most shift easily but that mower deck can be heavy. Be sure you can raise and lower it. Sometimes I have to use 2 hands but it would be easier with one.

Most are built by the same company regardless of the name on the tractor. Both of ours are built by MTD though neither has that name on it. And there are good ones and lemons on all of them.

Another thing to look at is how a trailer (yard cart) can be attached. They are the handiest thing.
 
Posts: 7286 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You may want to check out Consumer Reports and what they say about0 riding mowers.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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Kimm Sr. is correct "in a way", but I would trust the word of a fellow consumer over statistics.
I have owned and used two riding lawn mowers, since moving to Mississippi.
The first one and I really did like this one, is a husqvarna. My DH did no maintence on this machine, even though he told me he did. It was GREAT, until DH burnt it up! The one I have now is an Ariens. The Ariens was the cheapest one I could find and I could afford it. I do the maintence on this one! I also have a Poulon push mower. It's great in small areas and under trees.
We have 33 acres and I am not 'gentle' on my mowers. I have been told not to expect much from my Ariens, that it may only last for another year, if I'm lucky! It depends on how the machine is built. If it is built for lawns in a subdivision, it won't make it on my property, so I guess my Ariens is doomed!
 
Posts: 3242 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The only ones I've had experience with are Snapper and Craftsman. The Snapper lasted for many, many years cutting a really big yard and it was not pampered. We had a Craftsman that we got in 1999 and we sold it just before moving up here. 'Course, we traveled a lot in the summer and had someone else mow for us, so it was spared really heavy use.

I'd think this time of year would be perfect for buying a rider. End of season, you know.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6823 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We have several machines from a large farm tractor, a brush-cutter to a small walk behind. I have a TORO zero-turn riding mower. I'm glad I didn't get a regular riding mower because of the ease of cutting and it's actually fun. The quick response in turning is amazing. But even if you don't want one I would still recommend a TORO. You will get good quality and not over-pay for a brand name like John Deere or Club Cadet. We haven't had a problem with it in the 4 years we've had it. I did have to replace to blades, because I run over things I should leave for the big tractor. I would also recommend a machine with a Briggs and Stratton engine.


Life is a great big canvas...throw all the paint on it you can.
Danny Kaye
 
Posts: 7574 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I asked DH, my lawn man, for the stats on our mower for you.
He once had a rider with a fixed mowing deck instead of a floating one. It produced an uneven cut on our "rolling" lawn. Unless your lot is postage stamp flat, a fixed deck isn't a good idea. It's mostly inexpensive models that have it.

Also, a tight turning radius makes cutting a lot easier. This is different from zero clearance, I think... ? (I'm no mechanic, clearly.)

It seems our lot is similar in size to yours. His last mower purchase was an upgrade from a 30" cut to a 42". He finishes the job much faster now. If you have standard 36" gate openings on your property, make sure whatever cut size you buy will fit through them.

We have a Sears model, and he's been pleased with it. I think it's about 7 or 8 y.o.
 
Posts: 4683 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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I agree with zone9, make sure the engine is a Briggs & Stratton!
We have a Cub Cadet "0" radius that both of us love and you don't have to reach for a clutch...just bring the handles back is your brake! I think with you being short, that would help a lot!
We also have an old Craftsman that is about 35 y.o....they don't build them like that one any more! And I have a Troy Built and it is ok, but not always easy to turn...not like that "0" radius!
I also agree about the floating deck. I've had 2 Snappers and won't have another one cause it is a fixed deck. I also won't have a John Deere cause you HAVE to buy parts at a dealer...universal parts like belts won't fit the Deeres, only theirs will...and I'm NOT paying $30+ for a belt when most others cost $10-20 at farm stores.
You might want to look at how hard it would be to change the blades...those need to be sharpened a few times a year up there...here they need to be sharpened every time we mow and sometimes 1/2 way through our mowing...it's the tough Bahia grass that does it! But you can get your son to do that for you when he comes to visit!
Also, since you can turn so easy on the "0" radius, they actually use less gas...not so much covering the same ground due to wide turns to get to all areas.
As for being able to reach a clutch/brake on other mowers...most seats can be adjusted forward, but that still might put you too close to get off/on easy.
Take your time and look around. They also have good sales early each spring. Right now they are just trying to get rid of what happens to be left in inventory!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5116 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Consumer Reports gets its "statistics" from consumers. If you are a member, subscribe, you get periodic requests to rate products, express your opinion.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Not all Snappers have the fixed deck. I agree that the deck should be adjustable.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6823 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks everyone for your input! It gave us a lot to think about. Would be nice to get the lawn done faster but I do like the exercise behind my mower. Just not when it's so darned hot. These Ok. folks get out and in the middle of the day in the heat!! Not me. Oh well I WILL get used to it. Right stay under the AC!!!!!
I'm taking notes!!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: silly bird,


Carlene
 
Posts: 1814 | Location: NE.Ok zone 6b | Registered: Oct 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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We have had walk behind mowers that have transmission drives (not cheap belts). The first lasted 25 years, we are on our second now at 7 years in. It mulches most of the time, but it is just a lever switch and we can bag the mulched stuff, which we do with heavy leave piles in the fall.
They were/are both High end Honda Mowers. We are personally sold on the quality.

Whatever you get, make sure you can change the oil yourself, if you do not want pick up and drop off fees. (we do it three times a year) Sharpening blades can be a chore to remove on the big riding lawn mowers too.

No other engine works so long and often, at full throttle than a lawn mower. Changing oil and keeping air filters clean and changed keeps the engine working years without a hitch.
 
Posts: 9678 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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quote:
Originally posted by Florida Farm Girl:
Not all Snappers have the fixed deck. I agree that the deck should be adjustable.


"Adjustable" is different from "floating". When the deck floats, it adjusts itself to even minor height differences in the terrain. If it doesn't do that, the grass will be scalped too short on the high spots.
 
Posts: 4683 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by nettiejay:
quote:
Originally posted by Florida Farm Girl:
Not all Snappers have the fixed deck. I agree that the deck should be adjustable.


"Adjustable" is different from "floating". When the deck floats, it adjusts itself to even minor height differences in the terrain. If it doesn't do that, the grass will be scalped too short on the high spots.


Or in my case, you become ensconced on a tree root that was sticking up too high! My floating deck just rolls on up over it.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5116 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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