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  ID, is this a type of mint?
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ID, is this a type of mint? Sign In/Join 
Picture of blur411
posted
http://i.imgur.com/Hf9nEi3.jpg

Thank you so much for being so welcoming with my first post, this here I found on the edge of where my tomatoes are. It looked like mint to me, but it smells more lemony. Anyone know what it is, and if it's edible?


*Amber*
 
Posts: 33 | Location: Columbus, OH | Registered: Jul 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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did you google 'lemon mint'? the leaves look similar, but most mints do look alike, to me anyway. all mints are edible.
 
Posts: 3204 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Blur....Decidely looks like my lemon balm......and yes, it's edible. Used in teas, etc. But, like mint, it does spread.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jmchab,
 
Posts: 891 | Registered: Aug 27, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I agree... Most likely lemon balm, and it does spread rapidly like mint.
I whack mine back several times a growing season. I like to separate the leaves from the larger stems and plunge them into boiling simple syrup to steep until the syrup cools. Then I strain it and use it to flavor iced tea and to sweeten summer fruits and salads.
Any extra syrup I can't use within a week or so goes into the freezer so I can have it in the depths of winter.

Eating the leaves themselves isn't so pleasant to me. They're a little hairy and tough.

Herbalists say it's a moderately useful natural anti-depressant. Some say it can be a thyroid inhibitor, as well. So, if you take any prescription meds or have a thyroid condition, check with a professional for potential interactions.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: nettiejay,
 
Posts: 4519 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of blur411
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Thanks for the info about the thyroid, I do have hypothyroid...so I will just whack it down when I do my huge weeding on Monday!


*Amber*
 
Posts: 33 | Location: Columbus, OH | Registered: Jul 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of NC HillBilly
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I didn't know mint was a thyroid inhibitor. Thanks, nettiejay! I usually put some mint in my black bean salad, and make tea, and I have hypothyroidism also.
Pattyo
 
Posts: 1428 | Location: Dobson, North Carolina | Registered: Oct 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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Not mint, NC. Lemon balm.
And I'm hypothyroid, too!
What is this, the HypoT Club? Wink

Still, I do occasionally have lemon balm tea without worrying about it. Hasn't hurt me yet. But if someone has untreated hypoT and failing thyroid function, it's better to avoid anything that could make it worse.
 
Posts: 4519 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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