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posted
I just found out the there is a company that grows and sells mushrooms here and sells compost from the mushrooms!! Never heard of it before. Going to go get a pickup load and see how it does. No weeds in it they say, lots of moisture.
Another gardening adventure!!


Carlene
 
Posts: 1814 | Location: NE.Ok zone 6b | Registered: Oct 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spent Mushroom Compost has been around for years and has been recommended whole heartedly for use in gardens, recommended with reservations, and not recommended at all.
Perhaps this article from Fine Gardening magazine will be of some help.
http://www.finegardening.com/h...ushroom-compost.aspx


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have tried mushroom compost before & won't use it again. My opinion is not scientific, just my opinion...if it is so spent that it won't grow mushrooms...how can it be good for my veggies or other plants?

A fella that has a "free" community garden next to our public library had the same problem that I've run into....nothing in it to promote plant growth. He switched suppliers and got a different result.
So, I guess it all depends on how it has been handled and to what extent it was "spent" in the first place???


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Kimm.
I'll go ahead and buy some it sure will help fill up my beds! Another garden adventure!!


Carlene
 
Posts: 1814 | Location: NE.Ok zone 6b | Registered: Oct 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some people have not had good experiences with Spent Mushroom Compost while others have had fantastic results. The media that is used to grow mushrooms is quite similar to a good garden soil, lots of organic matter and manure although usually not any of the mineral component. Mushrooms need very little Nitrogen so that is largely left in the Spent Mushroom Compost, although there are other nutrients in fairly good numbers.
I do know some that used SMC as potting soil and had bad results, but most everyone I know that mixed this into their garden soil had as good results as they had with any other compost.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Many years ago when I first began gardening here on land that had about an inch of topsoil over heavy clay I bought spent mushroom manure but also "topsoil" (whatever that was!), and also added peat moss. DH tilled the whole thing in and I started gardening. This was before I knew anything about enriching soil so can claim ignorance. However the mushroom manure didn't seem to cause problems, nor did the other amendments. They all certainly helped to make the heavy clay 'workable' and it grew fairly well.

The only downside I've heard about mushroom manure is that it can be high in salts altho I haven't done much research on that problem. I think if it's mixed with your existing soil it should be OK. I wouldn't expect it to be as nutritious as other types of compost but that's hard to say without testing. Just consider it one soil amendment, add homemade compost as you have it and watch your plants for signs of deficiencies. I still think the best thing for my soil are the earthworms which I encourage by feeding raw compost materials and alfalfa pellets. Earthworm castings are the best fertilizer and not expensive when provided by my little garden helpers.


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12758 | Location: north of 50 in Canada zone3b | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Love mushroom compost! Is there a good deal on earthworms on line?


"Those that throw mud, lose ground!" :>)
 
Posts: 13165 | Registered: Apr 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As much as I've dug in this yard I've seen very few worms.. The D--- moles eat them and the grubs!
I'll probably get some dirt topsoil?? to put in the new garden too. thanks.


Carlene
 
Posts: 1814 | Location: NE.Ok zone 6b | Registered: Oct 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've used mushroom compost before and I had plants grow taller than me!! The weeds, too, but we were gone most of that summer so whatever weeds came up just thrived.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6828 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have used mushroom compost with clay soil and everything grew wonderfully. The only problem was the mushroom farm got their manure from the race track and you had to watch for the occasional syringe.
 
Posts: 7291 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Often people with little understanding of chemistry will make broad statements about something containing "salts". That is a pretty common term in chemistry to refer to any substance with Sodium in its name while many people will assume that what is meant is Sodium Chloride, common table salt.
Even the compost you make will have "salts" in it, things such as Potassium Chloride which may or may not be bad depending on how much is there. A "salt" may, or may not, be a bad thing.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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