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  How do you plant tomato and pepper plants?
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How do you plant tomato and pepper plants? Sign In/Join 
Picture of nance425
posted
Got manure mixed in with the soil last week.
Planning on planting the tomato and pepper plants this weekend.

We mixed in "bagged" manure? (Does that really have nutrient value?)
How do you plant your t & p's?
Do you add anything more to the soil?

I googled and found out I have bought determinate and indeterminate tomatoes.
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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They aren't super fussy plants.
I mix store-bought composted manure and a light sprinkle of 10-10-10 fertilizer into the bed. Then I plant 24" apart, deeply... For the tomatoes, rough up the roots from the soil a bit, bury the stems almost up to the first set of 'real' leaves. If you think cut worms might be an issue, remove the bottom from a large plastic or paper drink cup and slip it over the plant, burying the bottom edge of it to form a collar around the plant. This also helps keep birds from snapping off the plant at ground level. I do it just for the extra insurance of it.

I don't plant peppers quite as deeply; I bury the stem about halfway between the root ball and bottom leaves.

Place whatever supports you use now, to avoid disturbing roots after the plants have grown.

Apply mulch of choice. I like clean straw or bark mulch... Whatever's on hand. Water in... then wait... Wink

This message has been edited. Last edited by: nettiejay,
 
Posts: 4342 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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I do pretty much like Nettiejay. But I'm thinking of adding some alfalfa tea to my holes this time to see how it does. That comes out to about the same nutrient value as a 10-10-10 fertilizer. I use old tin cans I save with both ends cut out for my "collars"...recycle!! They last several years and I just store them in a garbage bag under one of our out buildings. I put them around tomatoes, peppers, cabbages & broccoli plants when I set them out.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of gardenpat
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This year I am giving my tomatoes a little more space between them and have partway buried plastic bottles close to them to use as watering system for a more even watering. I'm excited to see how this goes! The water is coming from our 4 (55 gallon) rain barrel system that DH put together!


pat
 
Posts: 5038 | Location: central ohio | Registered: Apr 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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quote:
adding some alfalfa tea to my holes


How do you make this?
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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I haven't planted tomatoes in a while, but I found that if I pinch off all the leaves except the top two and then bury the rest of the plant in the soil, it helps to develop a sturdy, healthy bush that will support the weight of the fruit better.

I also pinch off the first few blooms until the plant get to a healthy size and then let it set fruit.

Of course, this is done with plants that aren't over about 8 inches tall. Good luck.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6212 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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FFG: we did exactly that. How often do they need to be fertilized? And what kind do you use?

Do you have to prune at all?
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by nance425:
quote:
adding some alfalfa tea to my holes


How do you make this?


I threw about 4-5 cups of alfalfa pellets into a 5 gal. bucket & filled it with water. Stirred it up some, let it set. The water turns green and if it sits in the sun it will STINK!...it will stink no matter where it sits, but the sun makes it worse.
The alfalfa pellets work as fertilizer...it's about equal to a 10-10-10 commercial fertilizer.
Some folks put fish emulsion in the holes as they plant & some put bone meal.
You need a good soil test to know which would be best for your soils.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The only way to know what nutrients, as well as that soils pH, is by having a good, reliable soil test done.
The only way to know if you need to add anything to that soil is by having a good, reliable soil test done.
Those tomatoes and peppers will grow best in a soil well endowed with organic matter that is evenly moist but well drained and has a soil pH in the 6.2 to 6.8 range and has balanced nutrient levels. Calcium and Magnesium need to be in balance as well since plants need both to properly utilize each other and Magnesium helps plants make Chlorophyl and the Calcium will prevent Blossom End Rot.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8116 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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We mixed in several bags of composted manure before planting. Don't soil tests take time to get back???
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Nance, I don't recall what fertilizer was used but it wasn't anything fancy. And you shouldn't need to do any pruning at all once they are planted. As I said, removing the lower leaves and planting deep allows the plant to develop a strong stalk. And removing the early blooms keeps the plant growing rather than diverting its energy into fruit production. Once it starts setting fruit, the plant won't get any bigger.

Frankly, I don't remember fertilizing except when they were planted. Make sure they get watered but DON'T water the leaves. Its much better to just water at the roots.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6212 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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Ok, you guys, everything's planted, and I'm waiting. So, where are the tomatoes and peppers? I'm ready for my BLT. Smile
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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LOL!

I don't remove any blooms. I've also never had a tomato stop growing due to fruit set...it just keeps going....how far depends on whether it is a determinate or indeterminate plant.
The first of my tomato plants to set fruit this year has grown at least another foot since that first mater and it's still going.

Nance, can we afford the bacon??? It's gotten HIGH down here! But I'm waiting too!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I wouldn't dream of pinching off any of those precious, golden blooms. Stop growth? Never happened to me. My plants had blooms when I planted them two weeks ago. The plants have grown almost double in size, and one of those blossoms is now a marble-sized fruit. I'd be that much further away from my first BLT if I'd pinched that baby off!

I also have two green peppers the size my thumb to below the first knuckle. I can't remember that ever happening so soon before. And to think how slow it has been warming up this spring... Well, nature is amazing, I tell ya'.

Soil testing? For the casual gardener who hasn't had trouble with tomatoes in more than 40 years of growing them, seems a completely unnecessary effort.
 
Posts: 4342 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A soil testing lab can have the results back in two weeks, depending on how many they have. Unfortunately spring is the busiest season.
Having a soil test done is important for any number of reasons, although many people never have one done and then often wonder why their plants do not grow very well and have plant diseases and are bothered by insect pests.
Throwing down some fertilizer when it is not needed is simply a waste of your money and is a cause of polltution.
If your soils pH is not where it should be the plants trying to grow in that soil cannot uptake the necessary nutrients.
If the nutrients in your soil are out of balance they can interfere with the plants ability to utilize other nutrients, ie, too much Potash can inhibit the use of Nitrogen, Magnesium and Calcium need to be in balance for a plant to use each one.
http://www.ncagr.gov/cyber/kid...d/plant/soiltest.htm


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8116 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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