Message Boards

Guidelines

  • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
  • No off-topic or off-color postings.
  • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of HGTV Moderators.
  • No advertising is allowed.
  • Be Nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by HGTV.
  • For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.
Full Guidelines
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
milkeweed? Sign In/Join 
posted
I am seeing some of you are planting milkweed. Is that an invasive plant? It is used for butterflies, right? You all have me intriqued about this.
 
Posts: 15330 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Milkweed is the only plant the Monarch butterfly will lay eggs on and is the only plant the larva of the Monarch will grow on. Part of the decline in populations of the Monarchs can be traced to the absence of Milkweed plants. Milkweed can be invasive since it does send out a quite large root system which will produce numerous plants.
Other butterflies as well as Hummingbirds are attracted to the flowers Milkweeds produce which are quite fragrant.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mriley
posted Hide Post
The "milk" in the leaf stems is good for poison ivy. We always let a few plants grow for this reason.
 
Posts: 1502 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Aug 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
owie, there are several "kinds" of milk weed. There is the common one that most farmers have managed to kill off in their fields and along the country roads...this is the one the Monarch uses.
The plants called butterfly weeds are also a variety of milk weeds...orange, pink & white as far as I know. The orange one grows wild down here in a few places but is getting harder & harder to find in the wild.

Here is a link to images. The first pic is common milk weed...it's the one that has the big seed pods you will see in some of the other pics. The butterfly weeds have skinny little pods but still have the "fuzzy" attached to their seeds.

http://www.bing.com/images/sea...t=milkweed&FORM=IGRE

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mriley
posted Hide Post
I have butterfly weeds in my garden and they provide a bright orange color in the mix with everything else. I plan to get more this spring.

I like the link about milkweed. Thank you for sharing. Marylee
 
Posts: 1502 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Aug 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Does anyone have any familiarity with the "other" milkweeds? I have the common one and it can be a pain in the regular garden. Also have the orange butterfly weed. Want to plant some others if it'll make a differnce for the monarchs.
 
Posts: 951 | Registered: Aug 27, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I probably don't want to introduce that into my garden if it spreads. I am not much good in the garden anymore. I do more looking and not much planting or weeding. I do a lot of container gardening now. But, maybe I could plant one in a container and it would not spread???
 
Posts: 15330 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
Yes owie, you should be able to plant one in a container. And to prevent any further spread, just be sure to cut off the seed pods before they dry out & pop open.
Many folks use the pods in crafts for different things.
I don't believe that the Monarchs got to any other varieties...just the common milk weed. But the other butterflies and bees and hummers like the other butterfly weeds.

mriley, good luck with yours. Mine seem to be dying out down here. One of the other posters here sent me some seeds last fall...I'm hoping they germinate.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Luv R Pups
posted Hide Post
Actually I think monarchs can and will use most, if not all, of the milkweed family of plants. I know they will lay eggs and the caterpillars will feed on the common orange butterfly weeds. We used to have a bunch of it in the upper hayfield when we lived on acreage and we frequently had monarch caterpillars of all sizes feeding up there. I was even able to get the mowers to leave a section of milkweed that they didn't mow so I could move monarch cats to that section so they could develop and become more butterflies.


Luv R Pups
~ It's our relationships, with God and with each other, that really count in life. ~
~~ Gardening, a healthy addiction! ~~
 
Posts: 4368 | Location: E Cent. GA, Zone 8 | Registered: Apr 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
This may be of some interest.
http://nativeplantwildlifegard...lkweed-for-monarchs/


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8188 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
thank you. interesting.
 
Posts: 15330 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mriley
posted Hide Post
I agree, that is interesting. I had never thought much about milkweed. I think that is going to change. Thank you for sharing this information. Marylee
 
Posts: 1502 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Aug 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
Thanks Kimm, that is an interesting article. I've never had Monarch cats on my orange butterfly weed. But I do remember seeing them in the Midwest on the old common milk weeds that were in our fields and along most country roads.
So only 27 of the huge amount of varieties are what they use....now just have to figure out how to find out which ones grow in my area besides the orange.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Luv R Pups
posted Hide Post
I also found that site very informative and plan to refer back to it in the future.

Karen, your local extension office may be able to tell you some of the milkweeds native to your area.

You might also be able to grow this one, redring milkweed. It's one I may try at some point too. According to the USDA Plant Database, it's a GA native. When you click on GA, it doesn't show it in many counties down your way. But it's pretty widespread in AL and SC so I would think it should grow there too.

http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=ASVA

Here's a little more info on it from the GNPS Native Plant Gallery

http://www.gnps.org/utilities/...=asclepias_variegata


Luv R Pups
~ It's our relationships, with God and with each other, that really count in life. ~
~~ Gardening, a healthy addiction! ~~
 
Posts: 4368 | Location: E Cent. GA, Zone 8 | Registered: Apr 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
Luv, remember, I'm the one with the pathetic extension office. If it doesn't pertain to field crops they don't know diddly!
Our county is the largest in the state as far as ag. crops.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

HGTV.com    HGTV Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  Outdoors  Hop To Forums  General Gardening    milkeweed?