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  Hydrangea refuses to bloom! Help!
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Hydrangea refuses to bloom! Help! Sign In/Join 
Picture of Belstone
posted
I planted three beautiful Forever and Ever Hydrangea at my last house and they bloomed for three years. Moved them to my new home and they have not bloomed since (two seasons). I've given them the same eastern elevation but all I get is leaves, lots and lots of leaves. What's wrong? TIA.


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Where in the world are you?
What is the soil these Hydrangeas planted in like?
What does a good reliable soil test say about that soil?


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8158 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My question would be, have they pruned recently? I'm pretty sure the Forever and Ever variety are continual bloomers but it's always possible that they were shocked or something.


Happily married and mom of 4
Central maryland - Zone 7
 
Posts: 7650 | Location: Maryland, USA | Registered: Jun 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Belstone
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So, I'm in Michigan, halfway between Detroit and Lansing. I have no clue as to soil type, but I only moved across town so it's probably not that different. Here's the thing, a Hydrangea that was already here (in the exact location where I planted the Forever and Evers), which I moved about 10 feet away, is blooming beautifully so I don't think soil is the issue. What else could it be?


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Belstone
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RE: pruning...I pruned them when I moved them last year and I did think that might have been why they didn't bloom last year, but this year, I did not prune them...


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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I saw these tips for Forever and Ever:

They can be pruned at any time during the year without compromising the blooms for the season.

Beneficial Pruning for the plants:
1) Remove all dead stems from the plant each year.
2) After plant is at least 5 years old, 1/3 of the oldest stems can be pruned down to the ground each year. This type of pruning will help revitalize the plant.
Once all the old stems are removed, then shape the rest of the plant as desire

Suggested fertilizer: balanced, such as 10-10-10, following package directions.

I use Holly-tone organic fertilizer. For some reason, I had a hard time finding it this year. I sprinkle it around the plants in spring and maybe halfway thru the season. Whatever the package says. I haven't done it yet this year, but they have buds.

I actually am just getting around to fertilizing my Endless Summer because they were hit hard this year wo snow cover and then our 14" of snow May2. The green is just starting to come up from the ground and taking off. They were 4 ft around last year. Frown

I would wait it out. Maybe they're just developing roots in their new home before they have the "power" to bloom. ???
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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You shouldn't, nor will it work....you cant feed a plant into submission. If it's not blooming...when all says it should...its for a reason and the soil its in is only one possible cause.

The problem at hand evidently is affecting not one plant...but three...it has to be something that is affecting all of them.

Soil...they're all in the same soil so that's one possible cause....something in the soil is causing the problem.

"lots and lots of leaves"....that tells us something. The plants are all being made to grow foliage...lots of it.
So it comes down to what causes that.

Fertilizer. High nitrogen fertilizer probably fed in the spring and no doubt when they were planted in their new home.

Usually, plants will put up a fuss when moved.
They have to get used to their new surroundings...soil, water, sun....all can have an affect.
But nitrogen from all that fertilizer given them tells the plant to grow leaves...and the plant likes it...it says, keep it comin....but don't count on bloom. It aint going to happen.

The best thing you can do for the plants is to STOP ALL FEEDING....ENTIRELY, until it does bloom, then be governed by its performance.

Watch the watering and make sure it drains well.
Whether there is time left for some flowering to appear this season is up in the air...but you should be able to count on next season.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Skyler
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You've been given some good advice thus far. I just wanted to add that hydrangeas hate to be moved so they really just might e getting used to their new home. Good luck!
 
Posts: 10497 | Location: Southern California | Registered: Jun 21, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Belstone
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Thanks to all...

nance425 (I returned your PM), lots of good info, I appreciate it!

Loonie, since there are numerous flowering plants surrounding the hydrangeas, over use of nitrogen is not the problem.

Skyler, that's what I thought last year, but this year is just too long for it to be "moving trauma" methinks.


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Belstone, I moved some 3 yrs. ago. I got my first bloom this year....and it was HUGE.

Mine don't get any fertilizer, so that wasn't a problem.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4845 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Belstone
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quote:
Originally posted by ga.karen:
Belstone, I moved some 3 yrs. ago. I got my first bloom this year....and it was HUGE.

Mine don't get any fertilizer, so that wasn't a problem.


Interesting...as I mentioned, I moved the hydrangea that came with house and while it wasn't very happy the first year, it did bloom and this year is gorgeous. I'm glad you posted as I was thinking I'd move them to the backyard and replace with new ones...maybe I'll give them another year? Thanks.


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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I have no idea, other than a soil problem?

I moved three of mine (that never ever bloomed) to a new spot last year and they LOVE it, blooming like crazy they are, so I'm not sure it's the moving thing, so much as a sunlight/soil thing.


Wanda
 
Posts: 4866 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The majority of plant problems I have seen over the years can be traced to the soil they are in. If you have clay soil, most common in your area, that can result in a too wet soil and Hydrangeas do not grow well in soils that are too wet. There can be a lot of difference in soils 10 feet apart. Perhaps this link will be of some help.
http://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8158 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Belstone
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quote:
Originally posted by KimmSr:
The majority of plant problems I have seen over the years can be traced to the soil they are in. If you have clay soil, most common in your area, that can result in a too wet soil and Hydrangeas do not grow well in soils that are too wet. There can be a lot of difference in soils 10 feet apart. Perhaps this link will be of some help.
http://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/


That was helpful...we did have late frosts both this and last year...did a number on my Japanese Maple as well! Thanks KimmSr!


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3652 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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