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  How do you grow broccoli?
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How do you grow broccoli? Sign In/Join 
Picture of nance425
posted
Usually, we plant/grow tomatoes, peppers, jalapenos plants. But, I want to branch out. Smile

I picked up some broccoli plants this afternoon and know nothing about growing them. If you successfully grow it, do you have any tips?
(Tell me they don't get worms or anything, cuz that would really discourage me.) Smile
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mgt
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I found this article for you from Mother Earth News.
www.motherearthnews.com/.../Ho...-Grow-Broccoli.aspx‎

Good luck, have fun.


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I've decided to quit my job, drop out of society, and wear live animals as hats."
 
Posts: 7703 | Location: Black Creek, WI Zone 5 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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They do often eventually get little green worms...but you didn't hear it from me. Wink

It is well worth growing in your garden. Likes cooler temps so it is a good one to start early in the spring. If you have any cedar chips, this around the base of the plants can help repel some of the larva/worms as well as covering the plants with cheese cloth.

Biodegradable soap mixed in water (spray bottle) can also repel and kill the worms. Picking them off at night after finding them under leaves with a flashlight is another trick.

Fresh picked broccoli (and cauliflower) home grown, is well worth dealing with a few worms. After harvesting, good idea to submerge the broccoli in a sink with salted water, they will float off. Hard to see them, as the worms are not small, but the exact color of the broccoli.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: conrad,
 
Posts: 9432 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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I don't plant mine any closer than 12" and usually a bit further apart.
I can't grow it here in the spring/summer as the cabbage moth worms eat it faster than I can find them & hand pick them.
If you are going to cover them with anything like cheese cloth, you need to do it as soon as you plant them so the moths don't have a chance to lay eggs.
My heads get a salt water soak before using as it will kill the worms quickly and doesn't change the flavor of the broccoli.
After you have harvested the main head...leave the plants. They will continue to produce small side shoots that can quickly make a mess too. Most will continue on until a hard freeze. But if the plants die or quit producing those side shoots, pull them out.
If a head gets away from you and goes to flowers it's not good...but cut it off and wait for those side shoots...same with them too. If you let them all go to flowers it will quit producing.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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O Conrad, you would have to be the one to tell me. I will have my DH be in charge of these broccoli plants, then. Smile

mgt: the link didn't work but I manually put it in and read up on these plants. Thanks so much.

I saw where they use row covers. I only have 6 plants. I'm not exactly sure what the purpose of them is.
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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The purpose of the row covers is to keep the cabbage moths from laying eggs on the broccoli plants so you don't get little green worms!

Several folks I know use old sheer curtains instead of spend money for the row covers. They get them cheap at places like thrift stores. You can hold them together with clothes pins if needed. And bricks or rocks work well for holding them in place so they don't blow off.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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ga.karen: Can I just lay the sheer fabric over the plants and anchor it on the ground with bricks or something? Or do I have to prop the fabric up with something so they don't lay on the plants?
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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It's better if it is propped off the plants. Otherwise, the plants will tend to grow sideways due to the restrictions of the fabric.
Some of those round tomato wires work well. I used those earlier this year when I had to cover my stuff with row covers due to a predicted frost. We used the clothes pins to hold the fabric on them & then weighted down the edges with bricks. It worked!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of mgt
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I'm glad you were about to type in the URL for the Mother Earth News article. Smile


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I've decided to quit my job, drop out of society, and wear live animals as hats."
 
Posts: 7703 | Location: Black Creek, WI Zone 5 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
and they are so lightweight they can be laid directly on top of plants, which simply push them up as they grow. You can water right through the fabric, by hand or with a sprinkler.


Mine are a bit heavier because I wanted something to protect my plants from frost & light freezes. However, anything laid directly on top of a plant will tend to push it over some. If it were going over a cabbage plant...it wouldn't hurt that as much as it might a broccoli plant. And I certainly wouldn't lay it on top of tomato plants either. It would depend more on what you are using it on...IMHO.

Yes, there are many weights. I got mine at Gardener's Supply...catalog. They had a better selection of weights & lengths and were cheaper than most other places.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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gakaren: I was going to use some sheer fabric since it's old curtains, and just on the broccoli plants. Do you think I could just lay it on top or should I have to do the hoop thing and keep it off the plant?

Is the objective to keep the moth from laying eggs. Is that what forms the worm? yuk. Frown
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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quote:
Picking them off at night after finding them under leaves with a flashlight is another trick.


Conrad: You won't get me to do that. Smile
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by nance425:
gakaren: I was going to use some sheer fabric since it's old curtains, and just on the broccoli plants. Do you think I could just lay it on top or should I have to do the hoop thing and keep it off the plant?

Is the objective to keep the moth from laying eggs. Is that what forms the worm? yuk. Frown


Yes, the moth lays the eggs (very hard to see) and when they hatch you get the little green worms.
The fabric will need to be secure so the moths can't get under it. And they will go under something to get to either cabbage or broccoli plants if there is any holes/spaces. I would support the fabric above the plants at least until they get bigger, later the plants will be stronger & can support the fabric without any damage or funky growth.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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thanks so much ga.karen.

I think maybe my 14" wire basket (no filler) may fit over the plants for awhile. I can drape the sheer fabric over it and secure to the ground with something. Do you think it'll work?

I just saw this that someone posted. Have you ever heard of doing this?

bought medicated body powder at the Dollar Store. Gold Bond is the expensive brand or cheap stuff works just as well; sprinkle it on your plants -leaves and all. It will keep the moths and caterpillars off of your broccoli.
Add again after rains and a few times a week
Also, sprinkle a bit by the base of the plant too."

This message has been edited. Last edited by: nance425,
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
I just saw this that someone posted. Have you ever heard of doing this?bought medicated body powder at the Dollar Store. Gold Bond is the expensive brand or cheap stuff works just as well; sprinkle it on your plants -leaves and all. It will keep the moths and caterpillars off of your broccoli. Add again after rains and a few times a week Also, sprinkle a bit by the base of the plant too."


No, I've never heard of that. But I'm not sure I'd want the chemicals that is in that powder on my food items. I'd have to read the label to see what all is in it.
I think your 14" wire baskets will work. By the time the plants get that tall they will be stronger.

ETA...just had another thought about the powder...I really wouldn't want something on my plants that might slow down growth/development. The leaves need to breathe & take in CO2 and eliminate moisture. That powder could clog the leave's "pores" (so to speak) and not let them develop right.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4348 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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