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  Driveway is washing away...I need your opinion
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Driveway is washing away...I need your opinion Sign In/Join 
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
posted
Don't think this is a very good picture, but it's the best I can do.
This part of the driveway is usually in full sun. The 'orange' that you can see is the gravel that is being washed away. I don't know how to stop it. I have dug a dry creek bed and that is taking some of the water to the drainage pipe, but if it rains really hard in a short period of time, then the water washes across the driveway and starts washing out the gravel.
I have a thought of planting 'something' next to the driveway, in hopes that it will stop washing away the gravel. Any thoughts?

 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Hi Barb, you may need a larger pipe under the road. We have had problems like yours in the past and finally had to replace the pipe.
 
Posts: 2268 | Location: Coastal Plain Region ~~ Georgia ~~ Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Yes, a good strong corrugated steel culvert, buried under the driveway surface should solve the issue. Make sure it is a large enough diameter to carry the heaviest rain flow you get, however.
 
Posts: 9655 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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I guess the pipe is not the problem. If you look closely at the picture, you can see the drainage pipe under the driveway surface. It is black in color.
That is not what I wanted to know. I wanted to know if I planted something next to the washed out area, would it HELP stop the water.
I'm not sure how large that pipe is, it isn't the biggest one available, but it is adaquate. DH and I need to dig the creek bed deeper, it does help with the drainage.
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of bana
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saw this reply when i googled your problem:
"Best erosion controls are
1. Grasses
2. Sumac (any kind of sumac, but grow low will be easy for you to control.)
3. Any shrub or tree or plant with a fiborous root system."

and this link gives lists of ground covers, shrubs, & trees. sounds like its meant for CA but it might give you some ideas suitable for your area. http://www.theodorepayne.org/p..._erosion_control.htm

This message has been edited. Last edited by: bana,
 
Posts: 3872 | Location: Northern CA Zone 10a | Registered: Aug 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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Thank You, bana!
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of bana
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googled some more and came up with this..
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/f...efit-soil-67916.html
 
Posts: 3872 | Location: Northern CA Zone 10a | Registered: Aug 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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People plant "rain gardens" all the time to help soak up water in wet places. Wouldn't something like that work here as well?


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6696 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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quote:
Originally posted by Barb in Mississippi:
I guess the pipe is not the problem. If you look closely at the picture, you can see the drainage pipe under the driveway surface. It is black in color.
That is not what I wanted to know. I wanted to know if I planted something next to the washed out area, would it HELP stop the water.
I'm not sure how large that pipe is, it isn't the biggest one available, but it is adaquate. DH and I need to dig the creek bed deeper, it does help with the drainage.


Apologies Barb, I was suggesting a permanent solution rather than a patch. Been there and done that!! You're right about digging the ditch deeper. That will re-route the water which should fix your problem.
 
Posts: 2268 | Location: Coastal Plain Region ~~ Georgia ~~ Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of muddyshoes
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I agree with Peach! I think the grasses might attract the critters. Good Luck with all that & don't over do it ~~space yourself with that digging my dear! Don't forget to squeeze in a nap!
:>) Is the soil along the driveway basically a moist area most of the time. Southerns know what grows best. Up here I know privet & Norway Spruce
can drink up excess moisture.


"Those that throw mud, lose ground!" :>)
 
Posts: 13060 | Registered: Apr 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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After reading bana's link it makes sense that a fiberous root system would be what you want. I goggled bushes with fiberous root systems and got a lot of results . One is the butterfly bush which I believe is native to your area? If you think a bush would be better than grass there are plenty of choices.
 
Posts: 7138 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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Thanks EVERYONE for your replies! I really do appreciate them.
muddy, privet grows WILD here and is everywhere except where you want it!

I'm going to start with a crape myrtle surronded by dwarf mondo grass. The mondo has fiberous roots and it spreads.
The area is pretty much dry, except when it rains. That one spot in the driveway is a problem, but will be fixed soon!
Thanks again, EVERYONE!
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of zone9alady
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Another plant that has a crazy dense root system....Lemongrass. It spreads and also smells good. I had to take a hand saw to get these out of the pots, and they love water, sun or semi-shade.


Life is a great big canvas...throw all the paint on it you can.
Danny Kaye


 
Posts: 7501 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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The lemongrass was a great suggestion, zone9, but it's too cold here for it.
I read up on it and what I read said that if you get below 40, lemongrass will die. It doesn't like frost and we do get frosts from time to time.
From what I read, it would have been great to have and I may still plant some to have indoors and to cook with.
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Barb, I think we have pretty much the same problem as you and we get the super quick, super heavy rains down here too.
We dug a ditch along our driveway but as it fills in...dirt/sand washes in, it would still run over the driveway...so we put a downed tree log in one area where it ran so bad and we have been putting piles of pine straw in other areas...just what DH rakes up in the yard...but you could do the same with grass clippings.
It is slowing it down and it's not going over the driveway as bad, but still a little.
DH also built one little berm to slow another area...could you do that with the dirt you dig out of your ditch?

I like your idea of crape myrtle and grass, that should help too.

I planted some lemon grass early this spring...we shall see how it does over the winter & if it comes back next year. Swampwander divided hers & sent me some starts.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4960 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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karen, do you not get temps below 40? I read that lemongrass doesn't like the cold temps or frost and we have both. It may be only for a couple of hours, but I read that frost will kill lemongrass. I would really like to try it, but it seems like it just wouldn't last here!
DH doesn't like the idea of planting anything too close to the driveway. He's afraid that someone will hit it.
The situation is difficult to explain to someone, who doesn't get the super quick, super heavy rains. I'm glad that you understand.
The people at the nursery, told me that the best grasses are the maiden hair grasses, but I have those and can transplant a start. They also said that the mondo was by far, much better. I had the crape myrtle and didn't know where to plant it, now I have a spot. I had ordered some dwarf mondo grass, but had another place in mind for it, but I'll use it here. It's not a quick fix, but it may help and that's the best I can ask for.
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A quick fix would be an erosion control mat that you can pin down over the area. These are made of either woven straw or burlap, but may not be all that readily available. If nothing else contact the people that maintain your roads.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8175 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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I haven't had lemon grass but have had the pampas grass which grows well in Zone 8. Barb, would it be a plant than might help with your problem area?
 
Posts: 2268 | Location: Coastal Plain Region ~~ Georgia ~~ Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of zone9alady
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I've had my lemongrass outside for the last 8 years. We get 20's and even teen's here. It dies back like many other grasses. I whack the dead tops off with hedge clippers and it grows back when the weather warms up.


Life is a great big canvas...throw all the paint on it you can.
Danny Kaye
 
Posts: 7501 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Thanks for the info zone9.
Barb, yes we get frosts and down into the teens some winters. But mine are also mulched with about 6" of grass clippings.
I have other things...can't think right at the moment, that aren't supposed to live below 40º that will die off and come back. And they grow bigger every year.

And I've got pampa grass at each end of our property along the road....one side has grown HUGE and the other side is s l o w l y coming along....that side was solid HARD clay...needed help digging a hole to plant it! Roll Eyes


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4960 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Barb in Mississippi
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I'm gonna try the lemon grass and see how it does. Mine will get covered with leaves before too long, so I'm hoping it will survive.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Barb in Mississippi,
 
Posts: 3219 | Location: Holly Springs, MS USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by Barb in Mississippi:
I'm gonna try the lemon grass and see how it does. Mine will get covered with leaves before too long, so I'm hoping it will survive.


Well, we never know until we try! Good luck. I hope it helps with the water flow.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4960 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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