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  Planting bulbs in a raised garden ??
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Planting bulbs in a raised garden ?? Sign In/Join 
Picture of Georgia Peach
posted
I have 2 raised garden frames which are approximately 8" deep. My intentions were to plant iris bulbs or daylilies but now I'm not sure if these boxes are deep enough for what I want to plant. According to directions I'm supposed to layer the bottom with landscape cloth and fill with soil. Shouldn't my bulbs (or rhizones) be about 4" deep? Will the roots have enough depth to spread with the landscape cloth underneath? Should I plant something else?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Georgia Peach,

 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Where in the world are you? We could assume Georgia, but I would rather not do that.
If you put down an 8 inch layer of soil on top of what was there you will not need any landscape fabric.
What Iris are you planting. Those with rhizomes should be planted with part of the rhizome above ground while Louisiana Iris should be planted about 1 inch deep, and others with bulbs and not rhizomes somewhat deeper.
I have not found Daylilies very particular about depth since many root quite well if simply laid on some soil.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8146 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Waverider ;)
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No expert here for sure, but I did not put any of that landscaping fabric down first. I think cardboard is better if you want to prevent weeds/grass from coming thru. In my raised garden bed I put in my Sunflower seedlings & I had 6 Sunflowers blooming in about 6" of soil, along with about 8 tomato plants! It's amazing what can be grown in a raised garden!!!
 
Posts: 2364 | Location: "The Garden State", NJ ~ Zone 7 | Registered: Nov 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of owie
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I agree with the cardboard instead of landscape fabric. The cardboard eventually disintegrates and is good for the soil.
 
Posts: 15304 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Thanks All.

KimmSr, I'm in Georgia Zone 8B. My apologies. I didn't realize Georgia had so many different zones. I have no idea what kind of iris or daylily to plant. Haven't decided but I do know I'll need to plant those that will thrive in partial shade. Now I'm second guessing myself about the iris bed because of the shallowness of the planter box.

Waverider and Owie, I used the landscape cloth in another section of my yard and haven't been pleased with it. I'm considering large sheets of paper instead. My main objective is to keep the weeds down. It's in a rocky area of my yard and has always been a problem. I'm striving to make a perennial bed with lots of color in it!

Thanks again...
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of owie
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If I was using paper I would use a lot of sheets. I have used it in my vegie garden and loved it. It is a great job but I used oodles of pieces of it. JMHO
 
Posts: 15304 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of vera ellen
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Peachy - I agree with Kimm and the others. Both iris and daylilies are shallow rooted. You do not really have to worry about depth with them. If you have 8 inches of soil, then you have plenty of depth for both. Iris just need to be barely put into the ground, esp. in our area...and dayliles just need their roots spread out width wise, not so much depth wise.

As for the bottom...if you can get your hands on it, use cardboard. I've even used cereal boxes and cartons from 12 pk soft drinks. It takes longer to break down. If you don't have that, then yes, several layers of newspapers work just fine.

Whatever, have fun and enjoy your new garden space.

ve
 
Posts: 3498 | Location: southern middle Tennessee | Registered: May 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you plunk 8 inches of soil on top of any plant it will die. There is no need to use landscape fabric, paper, or cardboard under that much soil. About the only thing 8 inches of soil will not stop is Quack Grass and not even landscape fabric will stop that.
8 inches of soil is an adequate depth for most flowering plants, maybe not for shrubs or trees, but okay for the flowers and vegetables.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KimmSr,


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8146 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Thanks VE, I'm happy to know the iris and daylilies will work for this area. I've only planted what I call the old timey daylily (orange in color) and iris (white) around the yard. I've got the fever for a bed with all the gorgeous pictures I've seen on this board lately.

As far as the bottom being layered, KimmSr, I'm not sure what quack grass is but I have a terrible problem with Bermuda grass (Victory grass is what I call it because it waves it's V sign at me when it starts sprouting ... a constant battle!!) in this particular area where my raised garden will be. I'm hoping the cardboard or paper will help alleviate the problem.


ETA....I really appreciate everyone's advice Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Georgia Peach,

 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Ga. Peach...get cardboard.
I built a bed not long ago with about 12 sheets of newspaper and now I have Bermuda coming through it. It also has/had about 3" thick mulch on top of the newspapers.
Stop at one of your local furniture stores and ask if they have some you can have. You can get large pieces there & cut to the size you need. Be sure to put your bed boards on TOP of the cardboard so the Bermuda can't get between them as easy.

Kimm, as far as I know, we don't have quack grass down here. Bermuda reseeds, runs on top of the ground and also runs underground. It goes where it wants and will even come through asphalt. Multiple sprayings of roundup will NOT kill it, a small part will die & it will just regrow more.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4756 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I currently have my iris in 2 kiddie pools & they are doing just fine. they have about 6 inches of dirt in the pools with about an inch to an inch and a half above the iris rhizomes. so, your iris should be fine in the setup you have. just make sure that some of the rhizome is on top of the soil or they won't bloom.


cheryl hill
 
Posts: 375 | Location: lansing, MI u.s.a. | Registered: Aug 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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GaKaren, you understand what I'm up against Smile I'll definitely go with the cardboard. I had landscape rock in this area so I'm trying to get rid of those too.

Thanks Cheryl, I have a few iris in my yard but they never bloom. The reason may be they are too deep.

 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of SSTR (Stop & Smell the Roses)
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Kimm, what about Georgia Peach digging a (? inch) deep trench around her raised bed. Would the burmuda cross that?
 
Posts: 679 | Location: TX Gulf coast, zone 9 | Registered: Mar 19, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In clay soils trenches have been used to stop shallow rooted grasses from invading planting beds, but they don't work in sandy soils because those simply fill the trench in. The trench provides an air barrier that will stop the stolens although it may not stop the rhizomes nor any seeds that may get spread.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8146 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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I haven't got a clue, but I just want to tell you that I just dumped a boat load of iris the other day. The stuff is crazy!! It spreads everywhere! Your raised beds should keep it under control Smile


Wanda
 
Posts: 4851 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of vera ellen
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Just for the record.....down here, nothing stops bermuda grass. It must be kin to kudzu. It will cross any sort of barrier and as Karen said, even come up in cracks in cement and asphalt.

Peachy, you will have to stay on top of your perimeters of the raised bed, because the bermuda grass surrounding it will grow up, over and into.


ve
 
Posts: 3498 | Location: southern middle Tennessee | Registered: May 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Vera, I've lined the bed with cardboard AND landscape cloth so hopefully this will help the encroaching Bermuda. I have an awful time with it. Now I'm just waiting for the arrival of the Fall bulbs at Lowes Smile

Wwanda, wish I had your leftover Iris.
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by SSTR (Stop & Smell the Roses):
Kimm, what about Georgia Peach digging a (? inch) deep trench around her raised bed. Would the burmuda cross that?


Bermuda reseeds, sends runners underground...some pretty deep and also runs on top of the ground. If when removing it, you leave even one little node (spaced about every inch) it will come back. When sprayed with roundup or other grass killers...it will kill it back a few nodes but not stop the roots.
I have dug as deep as around 12" in our rock hard clay soil (?) and still not found the end of some Bermuda grass roots...they go deeper than that.

Most of the varieties of Bermuda grass were developed at the UofGa. ag satellite in Tifton, Ga....about 50 mi. from me.
When I took the Master Gardeners class for Ga., at least 50% of our "course" was on turf grasses and everything pertaining to them.

ETA...
Ga.Peach, you might want to get a step on blade edger. They are about 6" wide and have a small platform to put your foot on to "step down hard" with. My DH made me one from some old metal he had and sharpened the penetrating end of it. Where I have Bermuda, I have to use it about once a week to keep it out of things above ground. And as I told silly bird (Carlene), it may still get runners underground so I keep a watch in all my beds & spot spray when necessary.
I've seen those edgers in a couple of garden supply catalogs...I think they ran about $40...but worth it to keep from doing a LOT of digging.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4756 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Interesting info about the Bermuda grass GaK. I didn't realize about the different varieties of Bermuda being developed here. It is a constant battle for me and I attributed it to building our home in the middle of a cow pasture. I do have a blade edger somewhere. The last time I remember using it was during a dry summer and I just teetered on the top of it when trying to push it in the ground. Seems like I did give it to hubby to sharpen....

I have placed an order for Dutch and German iris with Michigan Bulb so I'm anxiously awaiting.
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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G P, I just would caution you about your selection of bulbs.

Iris....or as some call them...flags, grow large--their bulb (rhizome) is hardly in the soil and --I believe a lot of people are not aware of this fact....iris expand their numbers without you even knowing they came.
They will drown out other neighboring plants with their size of leaves and, even in the fall, when you cut them back some--to lessen the brown, they have to be allowed to send their energy back down into the soil.
Iris, for me, is better in a large bed, where they can be allowed to have their way.

For bulb planting, one cant beat tulips---southern type of course--bought at selective nursery, can make a raised bed sit up and be noticed.
In a raised bed, instead of mass planting one color, as is the way in a garden, a mix of colors I think is the better look.

I suppose you have seen massed iris beds, and are pleased with the colors, I caution you to seriously consider another plant for the restricted size of the bed.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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Thanks for the advice Loonie. I've got my head set to plant iris in this raised bed and have already ordered a mixture of colors. The soil is so rocky and dry outside the raised planter bed that I'd be very surprised if an iris will grow in it. I almost think I'd welcome it Smile I know it would help if I could mulch it more but I have the be very careful how I dig in that corner because of underground wires.

ETA.....I do love tulips and tried them several years ago after purchasing some on a trip to Holland, Michigan. They didn't grow very well for me. I wonder if others who live in the deep South can grow them? Ga Karen, Barb, Vera Ellen....have any of you tried growing tulips?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Georgia Peach,
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Ga.Peach, NO, tulips will grow green leaves but only one or two but they won't bloom here. We don't have enough cold weather. And the bulbs will die in a year or two also. Same with peonies and most lilacs won't live very long either.

My zone moved further south this year when the zone map got revised. But much of the time, my micro climate is closer to zone9 than it is to 8b. I used to be right on the line between 8a/b.
When I did the MG course, prior to the revision of the zones, we had 9 different zones in Ga. One was only a little circle near the coast and there are several others that may only be a few acres.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4756 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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GP, the spring flowering bulbs, Crocus, Daffodils, Hyacinths, Tulips, etc. you can grow will need to be refrigerated for a time before planting to simulate the chilling hours they need to grow and blossom. There are a few Tulips that might last more than 1 year in Georgia but I am not aware of any Crocus or Daffodils that will.
This web site, managed by people that grow spring flowering bulbs, may be of some use.
http://www.prod.bulbsonline.or...en/publiek/index.jsf

Which Iris are you planning to grow? The German Iris, "Iris germanica", aka flags or bearded Iris, Siberian Iris, Louisianna Iris, or one of the other some 300 sub species out there?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KimmSr,


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8146 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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quote:
Originally posted by KimmSr:
GP, the spring flowering bulbs, Crocus, Daffodils, Hyacinths, Tulips, etc. you can grow will need to be refrigerated for a time before planting to simulate the chilling hours they need to grow and blossom. There are a few Tulips that might last more than 1 year in Georgia but I am not aware of any Crocus or Daffodils that will.
This web site, managed by people that grow spring flowering bulbs, may be of some use.
http://www.prod.bulbsonline.or...en/publiek/index.jsf

Which Iris are you planning to grow? The German Iris, "Iris germanica", aka flags or bearded Iris, Siberian Iris, Louisianna Iris, or one of the other some 300 sub species out there?



The German collection includes 1 each of: Adoragon, Rarest Red, Rockstar, Lemon Meringue, Edge of the World, Cherub's Smile, Men In Black, Spice Cake

The other collections are just described as a mixed Dutch Iris. I'll keep in mind about the refrigeration. Hopefully I'll have instructions sent with the bulbs letting me know how to plant e.g., depth, spacing, etc. Regarding the daffodils, we do have a variety that is a perennial here but I usually refer to it as a narcissus. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I may be misjudging the dimensions of your bed from the photo angle, but that seems like a lot of plants to set in there. German bearded iris should be spaced between 12" and 24" apart. Placing them closer means you'll need to divide them sooner, in as little as 2 years, sometimes, and it will encourage fungal and insect problems. If you want to add Dutch iris, it's going to be trouble.

There's a lot of good information at the American Iris Society website:
http://www.irises.org/About_Ir...on/Grow_Bearded.html
 
Posts: 4476 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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NettieJay I am certain all will not be able to be planted in this bed. I have another bed frame like this one that I'll also plant some in and I have other areas in my yard I can plant the bulbs. Thank you for the link.
 
Posts: 2200 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
GP, the spring flowering bulbs, Crocus, Daffodils, Hyacinths, Tulips, etc. you can grow will need to be refrigerated for a time before planting to simulate the chilling hours they need to grow and blossom.



I have all kinds of daffs. They increase every year. The only ones I've had disappear are the white w/pink centers...all the rest do wonderful and they are in the ground & stay there.
I've never seen a crocus grow at all down here.
For some reason, most of the daffs are different.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4756 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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