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hydrangeas Sign In/Join 
posted
When is the proper time to prune hydrangeas? Mine are just starting to get some green buds on several of the woody stems. Should I prune the stems that have no greenery on them? Not sure what is the right thing to do.
 
Posts: 226 | Location: MA, USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rubyruby
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sue, find out what kind of hydrangia you have. some grow on new wood, some on old...that is the key to pruning. google the kind you happen to have and you will get lots of info.


"In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt"
 
Posts: 1174 | Location: Houston, Tx Zone 9 | Registered: Jul 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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If your plant is type "Annabelle"...big, white blossoms beginning in late May, early June, it is the most hardy of the hydrangea and can be cut back practically to ground level early in spring/late winter.
If it has been left at a height that is upwards of 4 ft, I suggest it still be cut back hard and it will recover this season.

If its the type that produces pink (alkaline soil) or blue, (acid soil) blossoms, then you have done well to bring the wood through winter.
Protect it from further frost and you should enjoy a bountiful season. It produces bloom on new as well as old wood.
Other types have their own idios so you should identify the type you have so that proper care will bring you blooms you crave.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Ruby gave you good advice!

Mine bloom on old wood so if I pruned in the spring I would be cutting off this year's blooms.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4380 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Karen, you reside in a southern clime...as does Ruby....and bringing a "macrophylla" or big leaf hydrangea through a cold winter is much easier for you than does Sue in Massachusetts. So qualifying your answer to suggest one advice is better than another---you might be giving a disservice to the gardener who has to protect much more plants that have to survive a northern winter.

Its tough enough to bring plants that sleep the winter away by dormancy than it is to bring tender wood through a similar winter.

When one has such tender, ill-suited for winter plants it is better to express hope that the plant survives.

This is the reason why many gardeners just refuse to plant types that have to be given extreme protection.
And, I might add, why many just wont plant roses because of their need for such special care.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by Loonie:
Karen, you reside in a southern clime...as does Ruby....and bringing a "macrophylla" or big leaf hydrangea through a cold winter is much easier for you than does Sue in Massachusetts. So qualifying your answer to suggest one advice is better than another---you might be giving a disservice to the gardener who has to protect much more plants that have to survive a northern winter.

Its tough enough to bring plants that sleep the winter away by dormancy than it is to bring tender wood through a similar winter.

When one has such tender, ill-suited for winter plants it is better to express hope that the plant survives.

This is the reason why many gardeners just refuse to plant types that have to be given extreme protection.
And, I might add, why many just wont plant roses because of their need for such special care.


You don't know me or what knowledge I have!
And whether or not to prune a hydrangea depends on whether it blooms on old wood or new sprouts!
DUH!
I also spent many of my gardening years much further north...so I have knowledge in both areas!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4380 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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We have Endless Summer, blooms on old and new wood. I can never figure out what is the dead wood, so I usually leave it alone until it leafs out a good amount. Then I can see the branches that aren't doing anything and trim away. I'm not sure I'm doing it right but it does fill out and flower.

What happens if I left those dead branches on the plant. Does it prevent the plant from growing and flowering to its potential?

I need a visual tutorial on pruning these plants. Smile
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Nance, dead is dead....there is no way to bring them back. But, often what we think is dead is actually just not showing growth at the time.

Usually we think to prove whether wood is dead by simply scraping the surface. Live wood will show green under the bark....and if it is indeed dead will show no green whatsoever; it usually will be dry, and break easily.
Plant parts that show no life might draw energy away from other parts that deserve attention.
The reason why we deadhead plants; to give energy to parts that can use it.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
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hey thanks loonie...will go out and scrape. Smile
 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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