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  Speaking of cakes and frosting.... UPDATE w/Pics
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Picture of junk collector
posted
I don't want to take away from Mountainbeach's thread so I'll start a different thread.

I volunteered to bake a cake for work and found a chocolate raspberry layer cake that looks fantastic. Basic sour cream chocolate batter, three 8 inch rounds which are then spliced in half for the layers.

First question - As new pans are needed - any recommendations? Need 8 inch rounds.

Second question - How many days in advance can I assemble this? Cake is for a work event on a Monday later this month. Should I keep it in the fridge once frosted?

Filling is 2/3 cup seedless raspberry preserves, 1/2 c butter, 4 cups confectioners sugar.

frosting is 1 cup heavy cream, 12 (1 oz) squares bittersweet choc, 2 tblsp light corn syrup.

Instructions for assembly is to spread the filling between layers, cover and freeze for 1 hour, then frost.

I bake my cakes from scratch but typically don't do layer cakes but really want to give this one a go. Any advice from layer cake makers?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: junk collector,
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Handie Ann
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You can bake your cake and frost it than put it in the freezer until you need it. I have done this before.


Handie Ann
 
Posts: 3507 | Location: Des Moines, Wa. USA | Registered: Jan 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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My immediate thought about that particular recipe is that it doesn't sound like nearly enough filling to cover 6-layers. The frosting (ganache type) will probably be lacking, too. And, I've always found it difficult to cut and neatly serve a cake with more than two split layers.

So, if you're determined to do this cake, have ingredients on had to at least double the filling, maybe triple. And be aware of the potential problems of cutting/serving.
 
Posts: 4476 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Maybe I could bake all three pans, assemble with only two for four layers, and then make the third into a mini layer cake for the birthday girl to take home. Would make it easier to freeze (size wise) prior to frosting too. From the magazine photo, the filling layers are quite thin.

DH insists that I "practice" by baking one today. Might not be a bad idea, as if it fails, I can plan B it!

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Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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quote:
And, I've always found it difficult to cut and neatly serve a cake with more than two split layers.


Have you tried cutting the cake with dental floss? I found that works really well for even neat slices.
 
Posts: 12497 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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LOS, DS worked in a store bakery for a year, and shared that tip with me too. Dental floss is the only easy way for cutting iced cakes! We store a container with the birthday candles, lest we forget.

Long piece of dental floss, suspend tightly across the cake. Cut down through the icing and cake. Then pull the dental floss straight out through one side. Repeat for the next cut.
No messy knives, or stripped frosting!
 
Posts: 9595 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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The main problem I have is not with the cutting, but with the multiple layers falling apart before the slice can be safely settled onto the plate. Happens mostly with the kind of scanty filling the posted recipe has, which isn't enough of a 'glue' to stick the layers together.
 
Posts: 4476 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One year, dnephew was cutting cake with the floss and brought it back up-----icing splattered over a large area. We had a good laugh and a good memory.


Strings

Friends divide our sorrows and multiply our joys.
 
Posts: 6257 | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Thanks for the advice folks. I'll bake a practice cake today.

I find most cakes (not mine as those are pretty dense) fall apart when cut. But I think most people I know use boxed mix and maybe over mix the batter, adding too much air to the cake. Hoping this will be a rich, dense cake that holds up.
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I hope so, too! It sounds delightful... Chocolate and raspberry... Yum!
Let us know how it goes. Smile
 
Posts: 4476 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Becky56
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I recommend the bright silver Wilton cake pans. They come in several sizes. Most of my bakeware needed replacing a few years ago and I bought the Wilton for all of it.
 
Posts: 3255 | Location: Bama G.R.I.T.S. | Registered: Jun 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Wink And I recommend USA pans. I am gradually replacing all of my old pans with them. Yep. They are made in the USA, not China.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb...2Ck%3Ausa%20bakeware
 
Posts: 16919 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of pinecone476
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let me know if yu need more volunteers for the practice cake. *grin* I'll bring my cup of tea.

I like Wilton pans too, they have straight sides and bake better. For cutting cakes I have a cake cutter that has prongs, it sort of reminds me of a comb. Good for angel/sponge cakes. The dental floss would be fine for even numbered of slices.

I have frozen traditionlly frosted cakes but I'm not sure about that frosting recipe. With cream it will need refrigeration anyway.

piney
 
Posts: 3177 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Cakes are out of the oven and cooling. This is a small cake (she says with panic in her voice)!

Three layers (I used 8 inch square rather than rounds as I have those) but each layer is just a wee little thing. And yes, there was difficulty getting one out of the pan.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: junk collector,

 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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It's shorter than I am!

And no, they didn't fall, it is just a really moist little cake. We have about 18 people in our department. And yikes! how do I slice something this thin in half???? Electric knife will have to be used.

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Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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I'm doing a practice run, but without the chocolate frosting as it takes 12 oz of the expensive bakers chocolate - four dollars a bar, need three 4 oz bars.

UPDATED: the cake itself is delicious. The raspberry filling is just plain awful IMHO. Far too sweet and I would rather just spread good preserves between the layers. Need to rethink this one.

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Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Congratulations on the trial run. I have to ask here -- why do you need to slice the layers? If you want skinny layers you can just put less batter in them and bake more of them. My aunt made the 14 layer chocolate cakes that way right up til she died at nearly 99 years old.

Oh, as for removing the layers from the pan -- use parchment paper or waxed paper in the bottom of the pan (cut to fit). Just grease it up well and pour the batter on top. When you've turned the cake out to cool, you can peel the paper off.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Florida Farm Girl,


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Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6479 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Pfffttt...don't slice the layers. Just make a 3 layer cake.
 
Posts: 16919 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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For your future reference.... Your layers came out thin because you used square pans instead of round.
The area of an 8" round is about 50 square inches.
The area of an 8" square is 64 square inches.
Makes a big difference in how thick the batter/layers end up.

And I'd do as Sherry says, not split the thinner layers at all.
 
Posts: 4476 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Who would like a really good laugh at my expense?

Recipe calls for baking SODA, not POWDER.

Great big "DUH" on my part. This is why I practiced.
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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No LOL here! But I betcha the liquid was buttermilk... Wink
 
Posts: 16919 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Hey, I'm laughing at myself!

It was whole milk. But I read that recipe over and over!

LOL - I got very good brownies out of it Wink
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Really? That's a surprise. Normally it's baking soda with buttermilk or baking powder with milk.
 
Posts: 16919 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Yes it was milk with baking powder. At least I know what I did and that the cake is good.
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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quote:
Originally posted by junk collector:
And yikes! how do I slice something this thin in half???? Electric knife will have to be used.


With thread or dental floss? I used to tie one or the other onto tooth picks at the same level and then see/saw it through the cake....when I wanted really thin layers. The toothpicks where on a solid surface so that they didn't move up/down while I "sawed".
Haven't done it in years though.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4756 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of jeepdarla
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About the expense of the frosting...bittersweet is the same as semisweet chocolate. You could just use a bag of Nestles semisweet choc chips.
I have done this for a flourless chocolate cake and it works perfectly and much cheaper!

Sherry, I noticed the original post mentioned a "sour cream" cake recipe...there is the acid required to activate the baking soda.
 
Posts: 3100 | Location: kentucky | Registered: Sep 27, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Bump.
 
Posts: 3224 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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