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posted
And now I am on a celiac disease and lactose intolerance diet. Anybody care to comment on anything on either of these. I don't eat nuts either or seafood. maybe can tuna or halibut fish once in awhile. I'm suppose to try this diet for 2 weeks.


x
 
Posts: 1238 | Location: WNY | Registered: Nov 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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Is this to find out if you have celiac disease? I have read of a lot of people (more and more) who have it. I just can't imagine giving up flour and going gluten free.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3484 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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DS is gluten intolerant, and can only tolerate a very small amount of milk products.

It is not easy, I can tell you that. Grains like quinoa offer full protein. And combining rice and beans too. He does have eggs often.

One gets very good at reading the small print on labels.
 
Posts: 9604 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Sorry to hear that sierramistplz -- that is a NO FUN diet!!!

EVERYTHING it seems has either gluten or dairy!

You'll become an expert at fine print -- but you can eat loads of meats and vegetables and fruits!

You can have yogurt and Yoplait is gluten free, I know that because I have a lactose intolerant friend.

And there is bacon and eggs for breakfast -- just no toast!

Martha
 
Posts: 5843 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ah, you can probably have toast if you buy gluten free bread! Do not worry. There is gluten free pasta, too, I think. I think there is lactose free milk and even cheese. So if you have to do this forever, you'll still have lots of food to eat.

Potato chips? Tortilla chips?
 
Posts: 6082 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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If it turns out permanently that gluten free helps you, Bob's Red Mill makes a WONDERFUL bread mix. One can make it in an auto bread maker, but I prefer to mix it with a mixer or by hand.

The grains we have now are so biologically/genetically different (along with the processing) from what was common even 50 years ago. I have to believe that this is a big factor in so many people with food allergies of all types.
 
Posts: 9604 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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We have some boys in our ch urch that can't have gluten. It wasn't till I looked for what they could have that my eyes were opened to how limited they were. I did find the good jelly beans if you have a sweet tooth. There ARE products out there..but it's a lot of research. I'm sure there are books written by doctors and people with celiac disease. Does your community have a celiac support group?

We grind our own wheat, Conrad. And...with this my dh's diabetes has left him. I think your correct about the overprocessed grains/those that stay on the shelves so long and people just aren't aware.
 
Posts: 5151 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While I don't buy Bisquik, when a friend was diagnosed with Celiac's and challenged me (I bake my own bread) to come up with a decent gluten-free bread for her, I noticed that my local grocery store carries gluten-free Bisquik. Check your grocery aisles...you may be able to find cookie, brownie, and cake mixes there too.

While researching, I found several gluten-free bread recipes online that required purchasing 4-5 different flours: white rice, brown rice, etc. I went to the health food store and showed the clerk my recipe. She suggested a Bob's Red Mill premeasured mix. So I bought that and tossed it in my bread machine. The dough was a bit sticky, and I actually had my hand on my flour canister to add a couple of tablespoons when I realized what I was doing. So the dough just stayed sticky. But it made a decent tasting loaf of bread. Friend was on her way to another friend's house to visit. We met there. Breaking off chunks of the top crust we all agreed that it was a pretty decent tasting loaf of bread. As we were leaving at the same time, I noticed friend had that loaf of bread tucked under her arm making a dash for her car (it was drizzling). She looked like a football player making a dash for the goal line. LOL

Long story...sorry...She did not have a bread machine. I stumbled across one at a garage sale for $15 and gifted it to her.

To make it easy, you need a bread machine. As the mixes can be costly per loaf, I suggest purchasing the flours you need...Bob's Red Mill or King Arthur Flour...both can be found online.

Good luck!
 
Posts: 16989 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Bob's Red mill bread mix works out to about 4.00 a mix when I have it on auto order from Amazon, no shipping charge. One needs to add egg, oil, and milk/water. Comes in a box of 4. Makes a LARGE loaf.

We have a local health food bakery that fresh bakes GF bread 2x a week. Their loaf is small, crumblier (does not slice as well for sandwiches) and last I looked, was nearly 7 dollars a loaf!
Big Lots here also sells Bob's Red Mill products including GF, so if you have one nearby, might check there if interested.
 
Posts: 9604 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CJO
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A cousin has this all of a sudden and she has made a good, trusted friend at a healthfood store (sorry I don't know what one, but I could find out...pm me if you want to know), and she seems to be doings well with the friend's recommendations.
 
Posts: 2863 | Registered: Oct 19, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thank you all for the information, stories and support. I'll let you all know how things r going


x
 
Posts: 1238 | Location: WNY | Registered: Nov 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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A good friend who also loves to entertain and cook/bake has become gluten intolerant. We discuss her dilemna occasionally. She said research indicates it can be familial. She said her mother, now deceased and uncles, grandparent also probably suffered, because they always seemed to suffer with digestive complaints. They were not fortunate to ever be diagnosed.

Also check with your treating physician about how to handle gluten free products with other members of the family. A relative said her husband's Dr. reminded her that she and her children should not avoid gluten entirely whilst they would become intolerant as well. So at home she cooks/bakes gluten free for her DH diet but at school and when dining out, etc. she and kids eat regular wheat/gluten products.

I think celiac disease has increased in diagnoses, other allergies as well. Genetically altered foods are also a big factor to blame for intolerance in foodstuffs today.
 
Posts: 2733 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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You have to think...is it GMO OR is it better diagnostics? Or maybe a combination of both...
 
Posts: 16989 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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My friend is gluten free. It puts a cramp in the diet once in a while, but she's used to it now and can eat just fine. Just have to be vigilent. Even so, she'll occasionally have something with gluten and live with the consequences. I've invited her to my house and it wasn't that hard to cook for her, after all, salads, veggies, meats, cheeses and such are all just fine.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6548 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have gluten intolerant friends and discovered C4C (Cup4Cup) flour mix from Williams-Sonoma. It has worked perfectly as a flour substitute in every regular recipe I've tried including baked goods.
 
Posts: 1860 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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What are some of the other less thought of gluten containing products? Didn't realize soy sauce is a culprit.
 
Posts: 2733 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Here is a whole list of possible sources to be suspect! You can also do your own internet search for (hidden gluten sources)

http://www.glutenfreegluten.co...n_Gluten_Sources.pdf

Any label that has "food starch", wheat gluten is often the ingredient.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: conrad,
 
Posts: 9604 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Bozie
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quote:
You have to think...is it GMO OR is it better diagnostics? Or maybe a combination of both...


Good point. And another thing to consider - GMO wheat isn't grown commercially in this country. Smile


Martha

 
Posts: 7085 | Location: Montana | Registered: Mar 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Often people are not affected immediately by the gluten (serious irritation in their small intestine that goes systemic).

Kind of like many allergies, there is a saturation level where the body says... enough! Sort of a tipping point? Many of us have reactions to irritants on a sort of tolerance curve. Sometimes it is not either/or but a level of exposure. I think this may possibly be the difference in todays products. So many commercial products use wheat gluten in manufacturing for a filler, thickener, texturizer and such...it is just consumed more?

GMO foods can often affect peoples gut/digestion and that continues to be affected by any other irritants? That is a theory anyway.

DS would be gluten free for a while, all symptoms would eventually clear up, and then he would try something with wheat and be ok. Then think he could eat some more, still ok, then it would FLARE. It took him a long time to come to the realization that this was not going to work for him.

As a toddler, we were often in the Drs office with a check for his "constant diarrhea/loose stools". The Doctor said he was fine just continue on the Toast, Banana, apple juice, till it cleared up. A very smart mom in the waiting room, looked at his fair skin and white blond hair and suggested I take him off wheat. With DH's English ancestry, she suspected Celiac. No toast for 3 days, and it cleared up. I continued to do this whenever it flared, and he seemed ok, until he hit puberty and then it was back again, off and on.
 
Posts: 9604 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks everybody I'm learning a lot. It's easier then I thought since I have a liking for food and cooking/baking just not the clean up. But I WANT my sweets/breads/pasta. I'm human not a rabbit.


x
 
Posts: 1238 | Location: WNY | Registered: Nov 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My husband found out 10 years ago he has celiac. If I can help in any way please let me know. Make many of my own mixes. From bisquick to shake and bake !
 
Posts: 37 | Registered: May 02, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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sierramistplz,

Rather than using lasagna noodles for lasagna, we've been slicing eggplant to the cooked lasagna thickness, layering lasagna as usual. Hub is pleased with the flavor. Reducing the use of noodles, reduces the carbs. Hope this idea helps to have a "pasta" dish without pasta.
 
Posts: 5151 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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I had never heard of this disease until the 80's when I went to lunch with a co-worker who had it. Now I seem to be hearing about it all the time. Perhaps it's just easier these days to get a diagnosis. Sorry to hear that it's happened to you.
 
Posts: 5977 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh, my goodness! From reading this thread I was sort of intrigued about gluten free bread and making our own so I went to Overstock . com to look at bread machines. (Many of you know, I am not too skilled in the kitchen department.)

Anyway, I searched for bread machine and found at least 3 different gluten free cookbooks for bread machines!

Just thought I'd share that with you. :-)
 
Posts: 6082 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I have NOT tried this, but here's an eggplant lasagna recipe that was posted on Facebook:

Zucchini Lasagna
Servings: 8 • Serving Size: 1/8 • Old Points: 8 pts • Points+: 9 pts
Calories: 345 • Fat: 17 g • Carbs: 16 g • Fiber: 2 g • Protein: 36 g

Ingredients:
1 lb 93% lean beef or ground turkey
3 cloves garlic
1/2 onion
1 tsp olive oil
salt and pepper
28 oz can crushed tomatoes
2 tbsp chopped fresh basil
3 medium zucchini, sliced 1/8" thick
15 oz part-skim ricotta
16 oz part-skim mozzarella cheese, shredded (Sargento)
1/4 cup Parmigiano Reggiano
1 large egg

Directions:

In a medium sauce pan, brown meat and season with salt. When cooked drain in colander to remove any fat. Add olive oil to the pan and saute garlic and onions about 2 minutes. Return the meat to the pan, add tomatoes, basil, salt and pepper. Simmer on low for at least 30-40minutes, covered. Do not add extra water, the sauce should be thick. Meanwhile, slice zucchini into 1/8" thick slices, add lightly salt and set aside or 10 minutes. Zucchini has a lot of water when cooked, salting it takes out a lot of moisture. After 10 minutes, blot excess moisture with a paper towel.

On a gas grill or grill pan, grill zucchini on each side, until cooked, about 1-2 minutes per side. Place on paper towels to soak any excess moisture.
Preheat oven to 350°.In a medium bowl mix ricotta cheese, parmesan cheese and egg. Stir well.

In a 9x12 casserole spread some sauce on the bottom and layer the zucchini to cover. Then place some of the ricotta cheese mixture, then top with the mozzarella cheese and repeat the process until all your ingredients are used up. Top with sauce and mozzarella and cover with foil.
Bake 45 minutes covered at 375°, then uncovered 15 minutes. Let stand about 5 - 10 minutes before serving.
 
Posts: 16989 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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