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posted
what kinds of food do you take prepared or easy to prepare when you go on a road trip. We are going camping and sightseeing on a poor man budget so I wanna stretch my dollars as far as I can with 2 adults 2 teens we are going 800 miles round trip. with a pop up and no fridge or stove. So I just thought I would ask what you would take if you were going to give me some fresh ideas.

When I get back I'll give you details on how it goes. We will be going in about 2 weeks.


x
 
Posts: 1238 | Location: WNY | Registered: Nov 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My DH and I traveled from PA to CA and back many years ago. We had a tent and a cooler. We were gone 28 days. Of course we were young and poor.

We kept that ice chest filled with ice and lunch meat, milk, juice, and a few other such things. We had bread for sandwiches, cereal, etc. While at the campsites we would use the grills and cook burgers or chicken, etc.. We usually stopped at roadside stands and purchased fruit, etc. we thought that we ate like kings!

This trip was in 1975, and we kept a detailed account of everything that we spent. We saw a show in Las Vegas, took a white water rafting trip in Colorado, went to Disneyland for a day, etc. Our total cost was $321 each!

Have a great time!
 
Posts: 3161 | Location: central PA | Registered: Jan 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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What will you cook on- campfire grill at campsite? Trying to think back eons ago to when we camped at rough sites. Two coolers are essential; one using dry ice to keep things frozen such as barbecues, pulled pork, spaghetti sauce, frozen hamburg patties, fried chicken done ahead of time. Second cooler held bacon, eggs, some beverages,cold cuts, cheese, ketchup, etc. Then when we got close to destination we would buy buns,chips, bread, etc. I had an enamel coffee pot that went right on campfire. Don't forget to bring couple hotpads, matches and aim n flame, maybe bundle of firestarters. Planning ahead is key, for food done ahead of time and also what kind of pans to use. My favorite meal was breakfasts-aroma of bacon over open fire is so irristable. Have fun.
 
Posts: 3130 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We made many road trips with 3 kids when DH was mil. and seldom ate in restaurants. You are wise to plan ahead but IMO a chill chest or 2 is essential. If you will be traveling many miles each day you can make sandwiches in the morning and keep them in the chill chest. Depending on your family's preferences peanut butter, cheese, sliced meats, bread or buns, cookies, and fruit is a good lunch menu that can be varied. Many of these things can be purchased daily as you travel if you don't make sandwiches before starting in the morning - they can be made quickly at a rest stop. I always brought a plastic tablecloth as most campsite tables are not very clean. I always kept some necessities for quick meals in a plastic tote that was easily accessible. Napkins which can be used instead of plates for a sandwich meal, a bread knife, knife to butter bread, a roll of paper towels, plastic glasses for drinks. Depending on your preferences a large thermos for coffee and plastic jugs for lemonade/iced tea.

When we traveled with the kids I always made GORP (Granola, Oats, Raisins, and Peanuts) for snacks. I changed the recipe (of course) but always used various nuts, dried fruits, and chocolate chips. I usually also made cookies and bran muffins for snacks before leaving on the trip.

If the budget allows a purchased rotisserie chicken makes an easy meal. I've made lots of chili, spaghetti/pasta, hamburgers, fried/toasted cheese sandwiches over a camp stove.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here's a recipe I've found works great for trips. They do need to be kept cool but for the first day of a trip can be brought along right out of the freezer so will be good for hours. I've taken these on trips and even eaten them while still partially frozen! They are good for any quick meal and snacks.

Egg Muffins (these are like tiny quiches without crust)

Preheat oven to 350F

Butter 12 large muffin pans

Ingredients:

12 large eggs, beaten
3 diced green onions (I used lightly browned chopped yellow onion)
1 large grated carrot
1 diced bell pepper (I used chopped broccoli)
1/2 cup feta cheese (I used cheddar and increased to 3/4 cup)
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

Divide chopped veggies and cheese between the 12 muffin tins. Add S&P to eggs while beating and pour over the veggies and cheese. Bake 20 minutes @ 350F (mine were cooked in 15 minutes so watch carefully) Remove from pans and cool, then refrigerate or freeze.

This recipe is very forgiving. Some recipes also add chopped browned mushrooms. Up to 2 cups of chopped veggies works. Cooked sausage meat or chopped cooked bacon can be added and Swiss or cheddar cheese work. There are lots of recipes with different ingredients and amounts on the internet.


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12736 | Location: north of 50 in Canada zone3b | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We used to do many of these same things on road trips with the family - but we used beach towels for tablecloths & blankets in the van.
We also kept the ice chest filled with frozen juices, which kept us from having to buy ice for at least the first day, maybe longer. Yogurt, string cheese, & cottage cheese were good for snacks or lunch.
Be safe & have a good time!
 
Posts: 6658 | Registered: Aug 22, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Been there, done that and have lots of great family vacation memories. Would do it again!
I always took the kids to the store at home and let them each choose X number of items to take along - snacks/chips, beverages, candy if allowed, deli meat/cheese. They chose decently reasonable things for snacking - yoghurt, string cheese or cheese curds, beef sticks, mini carrots, nuts, some candy.

I made my own party mix, took cleaned relish vegetables & some dip, loaf of bread, bought SMALL container or packets of condiments.

Vacation was one time I allowed what I considered luxuries as pudding cups, boughten cookies or snack cakes, little bags of chips, etc. (My kids whined that some friends at school had those in their lunchbox daily.)

We took soda cans or juice boxes and only put a few in the cooler at a time to last the day to conserve space. A small cooler was kept in the passenger compartment and the large cooler in the luggage compartment.

I'm sorry I can't be more helpful but we didn't have a camper on road trips, just at the ski beach and stayed stationary with electricity. A lot of stuff was done in an electric skillet and hot pot.

This past Christmas, DD & her fiance were riding in our vehicle. She mentioned how much fun she was having digging around in the cooler.....remembering from our road trips cause she never knew what she'd find! Smile

One tip that might be helpful, when we vacation I take a ham from home. Start the first night's meal with that from the cooler*. In subsequent days it can be used for breakfast meat, chopped for omelets, or stratas, sliced for sandwiches (cold or grilled), ground for ham salad, chunked for casseroles or pickled for hors d'oeuvre, and a myriad of other dishes if you like ham.

*I also pack some baking potatoes, can of baked beans, jar of applesauce. Then when we get to our destination I can fix dinner without a trip to the local grocery store first. (Remember I have sandwich condiments in my cooler for butter & use dip for sour cream and cookies or bars for dessert.)

Enjoy your much deserved vacation! Hope things are improving for you a little each day.XOXOX
 
Posts: 2755 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great tips. In a couple of weeks we will be on our annual trip up to NY without the benefit of staying with a friend so no comforts of home. Also the hotel does not have refrigerators in the rooms.

Normally because food at the tournament is so expensive we usually take our lunch and snacks with us. I can bring all kinds of salads etc when we stay with our friend, but will have to be more careful using coolers.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3529 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have rarely camped, only remember one trip many years ago where we went sailing and stayed on islands. I remember the mosquitos and cooking bacon in the morning for us (inc. a bunch of hippies we met on the island!)

On our recent visit to Mass. I had to take the food I was serving and so used an ice chest. I filled bottles with water and froze them, not only for cooling but to drink if necessary.

I am definitely trying JoyLuck's recipe as it sounds great just to have on hand for a quick meal.

It would seem to me that you might want to have meals that would include hot drinks/soups as well as cold. DGD chose to hike a part of the Appalachian trail as her "welcome" to college trip and it was a deluge for the three days it took! I'm sure they appreciated whatever hot food they had with them.
 
Posts: 12660 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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joyluck, I'm going to try this very interesting recipe. It sounds like you eat it cold, is that right?
 
Posts: 5990 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spam - that's the only time we ever bought or ate Spam - was when camping. Of course, bacon cooking in the morning is a camp must. But my fondest memories are of when my husband and kids caught rainbow trout - and cooking it over a campfire. Those were real memory-makers. This was in both Montana and in Northern Idaho - where we camped many times.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1137 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spam. LOL I ate it when I was a kid.

Bought it for vacation only one time when we stayed in a cabin. It did not taste ANYTHING like I remembered. I have not purchased it for any reason since.

Isn't it funny how our tastes change?!
 
Posts: 17085 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by CA Lori:
joyluck, I'm going to try this very interesting recipe. It sounds like you eat it cold, is that right?


Hot right out of the oven, warm, cold, even still partially frozen. I've eaten them at every temp!


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12736 | Location: north of 50 in Canada zone3b | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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What about reheated?
 
Posts: 5990 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just made JoyLuck's mini quiches. They look beautiful, but haven't tasted yet.

My filling was: about 2/3 of an Italian sausage which I browned with one cut up (skin still on) small (but large for that size) potato. Added some cut up left over froz veggies (carrots, cauliflower, peppers?) added about 1/3 large tomato,chunked.

After I got all the mixture in the muffin tins, I turned the blender on with the large eggs which I had put in. Blended then added to veggies. Blender was a good way to do it as there is the pouring spout. Although I was careful at first I found that the egg mixture almost exactly filled the cups. But of course that would depend on how much solid food you had used. Mine looked about two cups but I did not measure.

Had to bake them 3 minutes longer than 15. They look yummy!
 
Posts: 12660 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wow this is bringing back some good & weird memories.LOL.We did have a pop-up camper years ago,with 1st hubby.DH now doesn't like to camp.We have went with his DF & used his 5th wheel.We used a hot plate(eye burner),crock pot,electric fry pan,mini oven and take a surge protecter to use for many plug in tools.We did not ruff it,huh?LOL
,ya gotta eat good and food tastes best when camping.
We did use 2 ice chests, one for drinks, sandwhich foods & other for frozen foods.Plenty of foil & baggies to be used.

1st of all can foods: tuna, spam, porkNbeans, beanie weanies, manwhich sauce,ect.Any food we could cook fairly easy.
We did precook chili beans, hotdog chili and some meats. Froze them and placed in bottom of ice chest.We took a 5lb.bag of potatoes.We sliced them & coated them w/oil & seasonings & cooked them in a foil bag on the fire grate.Or hash browns ect.Yum

Here is a site and many others for foil cooking.Google and you'll drool at some of the recipes.I cant wait to hear the stories of your fun times. Becareful & have fun.

http://www.camping-recipe.com/

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jackierenette,
 
Posts: 3010 | Location: Liberty, S.C. | Registered: Mar 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lol...We can remember our parents could make it to the coast(s) within THREE days from the Midwest. I remember how they'd stop at the store to get a loaf of bread, jar of mustard, pkgs of bologna, chips, bag of fruit, Koolaid with sugar in it, the preboxed cereal(cold milk bought along the way). Away we'd go! Our parents would drive through the night while we slept. This was my dad's favorite way to travel. He knew there'd be good grub by the time we got to his side of the family/mom's side of the family.

Now, I'm married to a foodie. He sets up the kabobs, salads, fruits, beverages, hummus, etc before our trips. I recall having quite the picnic several times like this on various trips. I recently purchased another antique picnic basket. He's impressed and is already planning our next fall trip. It will be a fishing trip, so we'll probably catch some of our meals. Smile Heeeere....fishy, fishy, fishy. Big Grin
 
Posts: 5186 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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And vacations when I was a kid and with my own children was the one time we could buy all those little boxes of cereal that came bundled in a variety pack. DH & I had to eat all the 'good for you' varieties, the kids were after the 'junk' cereals.
Do they still sell those at grocery?
 
Posts: 2755 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Lurah,
I'm not sure if those are even around. But you're correct....kids got the sugary ones, parents took the plain good for you ones. I think they secretly had a sugar packet somewhere in the car. Kids didn't know about them. Smile Now, I like my healthy oatmeal with cinnamon.
 
Posts: 5186 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My job involves a lot of traveling and I always prefer canned food. They are delicious and always taste fresh.


Classic Foods
 
Posts: 93 | Location: Killeen, Texas | Registered: Jul 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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SEVERAl years ago (when nephew & niece were like 14 & 16), scored some SUPER CHEAP lift ticket for a ski place in Poconos... about a 2 hour drive. We loaded up like a bunch of wanders... kids fit ski boots/skis of mom & dad, so no need to rent equipment.

Ski lodges are IMO notorious for not the greatest food at a high price & I wasn't about to buy $4-5 hotdogs or dry burgers when we got hungry. Night before we set out, bought a dozen nice soft rolls, nice ham & salami & cheese. Kids were sorta mocking me as I made sandwiches for the next day.

When we took a break from skiing, I said YOU can go buy a nasty burger OR just buy something to drink and eat FREE sandwiches!
 
Posts: 5637 | Location: mount holly, NJ, USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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