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Picture of Linderhof
posted
What cookies are you baking this year for Christmas?

Martha
 
Posts: 5466 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Normally my first cookies of the season are the cutout cookies. Cutout with the Christmas tree cutter and sprinkled with green sugar.

But, alas, not this year.

Thumbprints but they're filled with cranberry sauce not jam and drizzled with an almond icing. Very pretty and very seasonal and something to do with that leftover cranberry sauce besides eating it on turkey sandwiches!

Martha

 
Posts: 5466 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh, those look so good. Would you share the recipe?

I hope to make some pressed cookies. My Grandmother had a hand press, but mine is electric. I do use her recipe in it sometimes. Also like a cream cheese version.

A cookie session with my grandsons is a goal.


Strings

Friends divide our sorrows and multiply our joys.
 
Posts: 6203 | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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A cream cheese based cookie for a press? Strings, would you be so kind as to post that recipe? If I make anything, it will be spritz and pizzelles, but since the press only comes out once a year I'd like to try something new!

ETA: that is very good use of the cranberry leftovers! Yummmm!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: junk collector,
 
Posts: 3031 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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CRANBERRY THUMBPRINT COOKIES


CRANBERRY THUMBPRINT COOKIES WITH ALMOND GLAZE
Serves: 2.5 dozen

INGREDIENTS
Cookies
½ cup butter softened
¼ cup sugar
1 egg
¼ teaspoon pure almond extract
1¼ cup all purpose flour
½ cup cranberry sauce
Glaze
1 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons milk
¼ teaspoon pure almond extract
INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
On medium speed, cream together butter and sugar. Add egg and almond extract, and mix well.
Gradually add flour and mix until just combined on low speed.
Roll into teaspoon sized balls and place on a baking sheet. Make a small indentation into the center of the ball, and fill with a small scoop of cranberry sauce.
Bake for 8-10 minutes. Cool on a cooking rack.
Whisk powdered sugar and milk together until smooth and then whisk in almond extract.
Pour the glaze into a small Zip-loc bag and cut of a small part of one corner of the bag. Drizzle glaze in a crisscross pattern over the cookies. The glaze will harden in 10-20 minutes.

note: I justed used the cranberry sauce as I had made it -- next time, I think I would take it and pulse a few times in a processor and not use the "liquid" from the sauce for my cookies ran a bit.

Martha
 
Posts: 5466 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of treee
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I make cookies to give to family and friends. I try to make about 10 different kind of cookies. in Nov. I put my cookie list together. here's this years list. I start baking cookies the week before Christmas.
1) peanut butter
2) chocolate chip
3) snickerdoodles
4) biscotti
5) spritz
6) russian teacakes (snowballs)
7) hermits
8) pebbles cookie crispies
9) sugar cookie drops
10) cranberry orange cookies
 
Posts: 655 | Registered: Sep 04, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Unfortunately (and can you believe it?), the kids don't care for cookies or other sweets that much. I've made cookies in the past and DH and I wound up either eating them ourselves, or actually bringing the tin back home with cookies still in it!!! Can't figure out what's wrong with those folks!!! So, unless I figure we're going to eat them, I don't make cookies much. Same thing for my spiced pecans. They hardly touch them.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6253 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I don't know how much cookie making I'll be doing. I know I will be making peanut butter cookies, but they are for a senior citizen information event at the county's annex. Of course I'll keep a few for me...DH is not fond of PB cookies...I think there was something terribly amiss in his childhood. Wink

If I get the chance...in addition to PB cookies there MAY be:
chocolate chip
oatmeal raisin (DHs favorite)
snickerdoodles (his other favorite)
old fashion teacakes
sand tarts

And I'll try to make a batch of Rich Crackers for the grands. Oldest grandson (3 years) calls them cookies. Instead of cutting them in rounds, I want to use the Star Wars cookie cutters DIL gave to me son...my 29 year old son. LOL

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KeepYouInStitches,
 
Posts: 16597 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Strings, I was intrigued with your comment about your electric cookie press. I did a google search and the only one I could find was made by Cuisinart (I think it was $25 or $30 at BB&B). Is that what you have and are you happy with its performance? The video looked like it might be very easy to use. My girls and I will be making cookies next Friday and I may want to purchase this unit if I get favorable comments.

I have my mom's old Mirro cookie press (must be over 70 years old), which I've used for many, many years. Interestingly, I looked online at Pampered Chef's press and it is almost identical to my old Mirro, it's just made of different materials.

Last year, I purchased another manual Food Network manual press from Kohl's (tag says $34.99, but I'm sure I had a 30% discount coupon). Initially, it was quite tricky to figure out how to use and the cookies are rather small. Since I haven't used it since last Christmas, I'll probably have to figure out how to use it all over again. There is a ratchet-type mechanism to push out the dough, which is different from anything I've ever used before. Hopefully, I wrote myself a note on the order of the steps to take when filling the tube (unfortunately, there is a wrong way to fill and assemble the mechanism).
 
Posts: 5887 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Craftyrad
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Haven't started making cookies yet -- today is fruitcake day, and it's an all-day project!

Our neighborhood cookie exchange is Friday night. This year is the 25th annual, and it's always a good time. I usually make cookies I've never made before, and maybe one old standby. This year it's Snickersnaps(also called Gingerdoodles), Raspberry Stars and Greek Sesame Seed Cookies. Here's hoping they all turn out -- last year I made the sesame seed cookies, tasted one and realized that the sesame seeds were too old, so threw them all out! Trying again this year.

Later on I'll make Mexican wedding/Russian tea cookies, bourbon balls, Scandinavian almond cookies, and probably a couple of other kinds from former cookie exchange cookbooks (I make up a cookbook every year, so there's quite a stack of them now).

My neighbor always has the cookie exchange at her house because my house is too small. I make the dessert every year. This year I'm trying Hummingbird Cake. Southern Living magazine said it has been the most requested recipe of the last 35 years, so I hope it's worth it!


Ruth Ann
 
Posts: 1628 | Location: MA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CA Lori, mine is made by Wearever. Have had it a good many years. It did take a little learning. It keeps on "oozing" after releasing the trigger. Just scoop back up and put back in the bowl or tube.

At first wasn't reading directions to chill the dough. If too soft, doesn't do well.

I think I have the Pampered Chef one, but have never used it.

Good luck and have fun "pressing" cookies!

Let me know if you would like to exchange some recipes.


Strings

Friends divide our sorrows and multiply our joys.
 
Posts: 6203 | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I got rid of my Mirro cookie press a while back and I now I totally regret it. I have tried different models with plastic barrels and they don't work well. I bought an Italian biscuit press but the barrel is so small that you have to refill it constantly. I can't believe the prices on Amazon for used Mirro presses, but if I want to make spritz cookies I may actually buy one. Does anyone know of another source for the Mirro press?
 
Posts: 3052 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Wow, is my Mirro actually worth something? Years ago, it was in pretty bad shape with lots of rust. DH had to take it out to his workshop to get rid of it all. I've been very careful to make sure it's good and dry before storing it and haven't had a rust problem since.

16paws, take a look at the Pampered Chef press. The barrel didn't look like it was plastic. I can e-mail my Pampered Chef neighbor lady and ask her about the barrel and its price. Let me know. It was hard to tell if the barrel held as much dough as mine, but I'm sure I could find that out, too.
 
Posts: 5887 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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I have the pampered chef cookie press and like it, though I use it only about once a year. Yes, the barrel is plastic but its pretty thick. I've found that some of the shapes work better than the others. No idea what it cost, I think I got it as a gift for a show or something. Been too long to remember.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6253 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Some of the shapes work better than others with my old Mirro, too.

Here's the recipe I've used for years:

1 c butter
2/3 c sugar
1 beaten egg
1/2 ts vanilla
1/2 ts lemon
2 1/4 c flour
1/2 ts baking powder
1/8 ts salt

400 degree oven, 10-12 mins. About 8 doz.
 
Posts: 5887 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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I have an annual Christmas Cookie decorating party about a week before Christmas for family - including adults - about 12/14 of us. Two of us bake Christmas sugar cookie forms ahead of time - then we provide bowls of buttercream cookie frosting and every sprinkle, decoration, gum drop - whatever we can find - to help decorate. Then, everyone takes home their own decorated cookies (including the adults).


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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In addition, I make gingerbread cookies, snow balls, molasses/date/walnut drop cookies, ice box cookies, sometimes fruitcake cookies, biscotti, and my traditional European kifle - which are a yeast-based rolled up crescent shape pastry with a walnut meringue filling.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, CA Lori your Mirro is worth something--in good condition there are several on Amazon at $100!

Last year I bought a Marcato biscuit press and it's metal but quite small. I made 2 batches of spritz cookies and it took a long time to make them. So I may get an old used Mirro for maybe $40. Ridiculous I know. I will see if someone has the Pampered Chef one so that I can see it. I have only bought their products from people at the office. I will have to see if anyone does that anymore. The moral from my story is never let a grown child talk you into throwing kitchen stuff out. I never thought that it would be this hard to replace.
 
Posts: 3052 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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I found my Mirro set at a thrift shop. There are many people who don't know the value of these. Am I ever glad I found it!

I read 16 paws moral of the story: "never let a grown child talk you into throwing kitchen stuff out."....... :0) Especially if the grown child doesn't cook!

I can't wait to tell my husband what a great shopper I have been! Thanks for sharing this info with me.
 
Posts: 5069 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just out of curiosity I went to eBay and searched for cookie presses. I saw 3 or 4 like mine, two were asking $49.99 and one was asking $79.99. Think mine was about $25-30 many years ago. Can't remember how many years, but think my youngest was small and he is now 47.

I hope my late grandmother's press is still here somewhere, just for sentimental reasons. I didn't have enough strength in my hands years ago and they are much worse now.

Have fun with the cookie baking.


Strings

Friends divide our sorrows and multiply our joys.
 
Posts: 6203 | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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My daughter and I (she's 46) call Spritz pressed cookies, "Swearing cookies." Why? Well, when they didn't extrude as we wished they would, it took lots of swearing and patience to not just throw out the whole batch of dough. I used one of those Mirro presses - and have purchased lots of others since those early days when I made lots of them - but none really ever worked as well. I agree with that. I probably have one around somewhere too.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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I have my old Mirro cookie press and it's still in the original dilapidated box! Not parting with it!
I also have an Atlas Cookie Press/Biscuit Press...I've used it once or twice, but as far as I was concerned...it didn't compare to my old Mirro!

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb...las%20cookie%20press

My cookie baking has already started...

Chocolate Chip w/walnuts...in the freezer
Praline Cookies...done today
No Bake Chocolate/Oatmeal/Peanut Butter cookies...done today.
Going to mix up my Never Fail Sugar Cookies tonight since they have to be chilled anyway. I'll bake them tomorrow.
Mexican Wedding cookies...tomorrow-maybe, depends on the weather
And some kind that will go through the press, not sure which kind yet.
Chocolate fudge made
Candied Walnuts made
Brittle...maybe tomorrow...again the weather.
Not sure if I'll do pralines this year or not, maybe a few for grandson.

I need to get mine done so that I can get a couple of boxes off to the kids & grands in Japan...so they get them before Christmas...maybe! That depends on military mail! Roll Eyes


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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I love cookies, but draw the line as to what I will bake and call Christmas cookies! Sugar cut outs, thumbprints, Russian Teacakes, fruitcake drops/Hermits, Spritz.
I regularly bake lunchbox cookies throughout the other 11 months of the year - chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin, PB, Snickerdoodles, drop sugar cookies, molasses crinkles and gingersnaps.
 
Posts: 2658 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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My husband is concerned that I've not started yet....lol....Last night, we went through our cookie list. 17 varieties of cookies: too much? I'm planning, drop cookies and bar cookies and cookies that need to be put in the refrigerator before slicing and baking. I think it will take about four to five days to get all my treats pulled together and baked. Whew! I have two mixers that can be buzzing while I make some with a hand held mixer. I just have to be sure the ingredients are next to the right mixer. So, I don't say, "Does this go in this one/that one?" lol

I tried to get in the cookie swap several states away. MIL suggested I NOT do it because the cookies would arrive crumbled.

ga.Karen, I hope this doesn't deter you for sending to your family in Japan. I know how important it is for family away from home getting their treats.

Happy Baking, everyone!
 
Posts: 5069 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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eBay shows several Mirro cookie presses beginning at "Buy it Now" for $12.99 and up.

I admit it. Last night I was tempted to click "Buy it Now." Then I slapped myself and jolted out of the stupor. Wink

Edited to add the eBay link:
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html...s&_sacat=0&_from=R40
 
Posts: 16597 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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I find that measuring out the dry ingredients before-hand - while the flour and sugar and baking powder, etc... are all out on the counter saves time and mess. Of course, be sure to label the Ziploc bags (that I use for this) with the appropriate cookie type. Getting all the bags of dry ingredients are easy to mix up. LABEL - LABEL - LABEL.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was thinking chocolate triangle tarts, and eggnog Cookies.


Classic Foods
 
Posts: 82 | Location: Killeen, Texas | Registered: Jul 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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I agree with Lurah - that I only designate certain cookies as Christmas time cookies: sugar cookie cutouts, gingerbread, snow balls, Spritz, fruitcake drops, hermits with molasses and dates, and certain icebox cookies - and in my case, Kifle are always baked only at Xmas. For the rest of the year, I bake few cookies - maybe oatmeal raisin and biscotti. Fudge and Fudge meltaways are also only Christmas time treats but I very seldom make them anymore - oh - and bourbon / rum / balls - those are definitely holiday only treats.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of cocok
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I'm with Lurah and Seaborne. To me Christmas cookies are only baked at Christmas. (Spritz, gingerbread men, cutout sugar cookies, date filled cookies) I bake "ordinary cookies" (chocolate chip, oatmeal, snickerdoodles, peanut butter) the rest of the year.

I'll probably do my baking next week. Not making as many things this year, as I'm not having as much company as usual.
 
Posts: 7098 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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I'll make sugar cookie cutouts on Friday and Saturday for my Cookie Decorating Party on Monday and Gingerbread. Then, I'll make some fruit drops and date cookies of some kind and maybe icebox - with pecans and cherries - later next week. They're lots easier than Spritz - but still have a shortbread-type texture. The Kifle cookies need a whole day to themselves - just before Xmas.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 997 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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