Message Boards

Guidelines

  • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
  • No off-topic or off-color postings.
  • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of HGTV Moderators.
  • No advertising is allowed.
  • Be Nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by HGTV.
  • For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.
Full Guidelines

  HGTV.com
  HGTV Message Boards
Hop To Forum Categories   At Home
Hop To Forums   Food & Entertaining
  Cookbook Recommendations
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Cookbook Recommendations Sign In/Join 
posted
I thought I would start a discussion where we could share cookbook recommendations. I admit that I get most of my recipes off the Internet these days, but I still enjoy reading an interesting cookbook. Starting this week, I've been recording a cooking show on the Cooking Channel called, French Food at Home. I've been enjoying the chef/hostess' approach so I started looking for her cookbooks. The latest one, Dinner Chez Moi got pretty good reviews, so I splurged and bought a new copy from Amazon.ca which was a little cheaper than Amazon.com's offerings. I expected to wait a while to receive it from Canada, but it arrived in just two days...yay! I'm enjoying it almost as much as the latest novel and wanted to share my excitement with you.

So, what's your latest or most favorite cookbook?
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of cocok
posted Hide Post
My favorite source of recipes is "Cooks" magazine. I love how they explain the science behind the recipe, and every single recipe I have tried has been good. I don't bother much with other cookbooks these days.
 
Posts: 7075 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
Gracie -- I, too, adore Laura Calder. I got Dinner Chez Moi when we went to a Canadian Costco. Never heard of her but liked the book. Then I found her show, and got her other two cookbooks. She is one of my favorites!!!! I've fixed a lot of her recipes between the show and the books. And they were all good!

Martha
 
Posts: 5400 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Linderhof:
Gracie -- I, too, adore Laura Calder. I got Dinner Chez Moi when we went to a Canadian Costco. Never heard of her but liked the book. Then I found her show, and got her other two cookbooks. She is one of my favorites!!!! I've fixed a lot of her recipes between the show and the books. And they were all good!

Martha

I was thinking of you when I started this discussion because Laura Calder's recipes seem to be right up your alley. How funny that you are already a fan. That makes so much sense to me.
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Cocok, I'm pretty new to cooking and I've never even picked up a copy of Cook's. I'll have to check it out based on your recommendation.
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
posted Hide Post
I have a few older books that are pretty worn from use that I'd recommend - The Breakfast Book by Marion Cunningham and Anita Pritchard's Back to Basics American Cooking.

For more up to date cookbooks I have all of Ina Garten's books and use them when I want to try something new that always gets rave reviews!

Otherwise, I use my own family cookbook regularly. Sorry it is out of print at the moment.
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
Gracie -- my two favorites are Ina Garten and Anna Pump -- Anna worked for Ina in the early years and their recipes (and styles) are quite similar. I found Anna before I found Ina and Anna's book Country Weekend Entertaining is one of my all time favorite cookbooks! I also have become enamored, of late, with The Canal House and got their first three cookbooks (small, paperback books arranged by season) and have made recipes from them as well. They have a pain d'espices bread (without spices in it) that is so good and reminds me of Starbucks gingerbread without the cream cheese frosting.

They have lots (like 7) of those little cookbooks and one big one that I'm yearning for and will probably get at some point.

They're two ladies who have food magazine writing credentials (editor, etc.) who cook lunch and write about it . . . in those books and on a blog. Their approach is fresh and seasonal.

Another new "love" is Noel Richardson from Ravenshill Herb Farm who I found quite by accident -- she has a great approach to cooking using, of course, lots of fresh herbs.

Martha
 
Posts: 5400 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Linderhof:
Gracie -- my two favorites are Ina Garten and Anna Pump -- Anna worked for Ina in the early years and their recipes (and styles) are quite similar. I found Anna before I found Ina and Anna's book Country Weekend Entertaining is one of my all time favorite cookbooks! I also have become enamored, of late, with The Canal House and got their first three cookbooks (small, paperback books arranged by season) and have made recipes from them as well. They have a pain d'espices bread (without spices in it) that is so good and reminds me of Starbucks gingerbread without the cream cheese frosting.

They have lots (like 7) of those little cookbooks and one big one that I'm yearning for and will probably get at some point.

They're two ladies who have food magazine writing credentials (editor, etc.) who cook lunch and write about it . . . in those books and on a blog. Their approach is fresh and seasonal.

Another new "love" is Noel Richardson from Ravenshill Herb Farm who I found quite by accident -- she has a great approach to cooking using, of course, lots of fresh herbs.

Martha

Thank you so much for the additional resources. Smile I always enjoy Ina Garten's recipes so I shall definitely check out Anna Pump as well as The Canal House and Noel Richardson. I think I see another cookbook in my future...lol.
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Lurah, I like Ina Garten's recipes, too, although I usually have to reduce the salt. She and I must have very different palates when it comes to saltiness. I didn't buy her latest cookbook, but I record her shows on Food Network and pull those recipes off their web site.
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Kathy_in_wlsv
posted Hide Post
I have a collection of vintage cookbooks, mostly 1920-1960, but my favorite, go-to cook book is the "Doubleday Cookbook" By Jean Anderson.. the 1978 (ish) edition. I've worn the covers off and lost half the index.

I also love Ida Bailey Allen's "Cooking, Menus, Service." from the mid 20's which I actually use.


Life is GOOD!!
 
Posts: 1508 | Location: Upstate NY | Registered: Nov 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
posted Hide Post
Graciepj - Not guessing your age, but the salt becomes more necessary as we get older. In my younger days I rarely cooked with salt on the stovetop. Used what was called for in baking.
Never salted my food at the table or when dining out.
As I reached mid 40's this became necessary, and altho I still seldom salt at the table, I do at the stovetop.

In my experience, learned at French cooking school how important salt is to a recipe, be it baking or cooking. Our instructors were much like Julia - they used their palm or fingers to measure salt.

And about freshly ground pepper - I never knew how many grinds to add when I'm cooking. So the other day I figured out that for me 25 grinds of my pepper mill equalled about 1/4 teaspoon.
So I guess my customary 100 grinds in a 10 pound batch of potato salad wasn't too far off!
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Kathy_in_wlsv, I love that you have vintage cookbooks. I have a family cookbook that we put together some years ago to capture some of the oldest generation's recipes along with some of the newer ones. My mother is interested in genealogy so she added some images of ancestors and and documents related to the recipes. It's become one of my treasured possessions.

Lurah, I think I'm probably a little over-sensitive to saltiness. I do use it in cooking, but sparingly. I also tell guests to feel free to add salt as I tend to under-salt things. BTW, I'm so envious that you attended a French cooking school. You should tell us more about that. As to the 100 grinds of pepper...my wrist would be aching...lol. I think I would have to grind a big batch in my spice mill in advance when I knew I would need that much.

Edited because I misspelled genealogy.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Graciepj,
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
Gracie -- if I'm doing a lot of cooking, that's what I do, grind a small bowl full of pepper to use by the quarter or half teaspoon. MUCH easier on my wrist!!!!

Martha
 
Posts: 5400 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
posted Hide Post
Do you ladies that have spice grinders recommend a particular brand? I've used my coffee grinder occasioanlly for spices.
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Have resisted posting on this thread but now am giving in ~ I do have a BIG preference when it comes to cookbooks! For myself, I have probably bought dozens and when my Mom passed, I inherited several dozen more. And I have given away nearly all of them hoping someone else will enjoy them....

All were valuable for the recipes, suggestions and ideas they held, but it was easy to let them go. I have a few that I will never let go ~ call them community cookbooks, neighborhood accumulations or charitable organizational fundraiser types ~ you know, the one where everyone gives up their best recipes AND tell you how to do it as they do?

Well, those are the ones I keep...
 
Posts: 6487 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have a few cookbooks--not sure if they're good or not, definitely they're not fancy--and I do really enjoy looking through them. (Ok, I admit, I have at least one of the Campbell soup cookbooks.)

I have heard nothing but nice things about Ina's cookbooks. I may try one of hers though I really need simple but tasty recipes.
 
Posts: 6052 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
Lurah -- mine is a coffee grinder that I bought at Wal Mart, kept only for spices (which is mostly peppper) -- cost $5, I think. I've had it "forever"!

Martha
 
Posts: 5400 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Lurah, I also use an old coffee grinder that I've had for years to grind spices.

Idaho Resident, community/organization cookbooks can have some of the most interesting heirloom recipes in them. I also like cookbooks, though, that transport me through the text and pictures. I might only make one or two recipes from them, but I enjoy reading them just like I would enjoy reading a novel or a book about decor.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Graciepj,
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nance425
posted Hide Post
Martha - sounds like you need an electric pepper mill. I have one I got from QVC years ago like the ones in this link. Paid almost $30 for one.
I recently bought a Quisinart at our dept store and use it for sea salt. I love them! Don't know the brands of these, but this is a great deal for two. My guests love playing with them and especially love the light that comes on. Smile

http://www.overstock.com/Home-...M@P:20130502052324:s

 
Posts: 4582 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: Dec 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I have a prized copy of the old Betty Crocker cookbook which includes recipes such as our family's traditional Christmas pie.

I love my Ina Garten cookbooks, since her recipes do turn out well and her instructions are exact. I also love her tv programs.
She seems so comfortable and she recognizes that everyone doesn't have culinary school training.

For baking, I found Nick Malgeri's books are fabulous. His breads are wonderful and his recipe for Chocolate cupcakes is simply divine. He has baking books, a chocolate book, etc. I saw him on Martha Stewart several years ago and got his book out of the library. Well several days later I bought it since the recipes were excellent.

I have a couple Maida Heater's cookie books which are also easy to follow and the cookies great. One of her recipes uses Heath Bar bits which I take to parties and they never fail to disappear very quickly.
 
Posts: 3048 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Oh, goodie, more authors to check out. Thanks for the recommendations, 16paws.
 
Posts: 1721 | Registered: Aug 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Do you have any recommendations for crock pot cookbooks?
 
Posts: 6052 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

HGTV.com    HGTV Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  At Home  Hop To Forums  Food & Entertaining    Cookbook Recommendations