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Picture of Lurah
posted
I'm not sure what to refer to the green beans a friend shared with me today. They are huge, very long pods and bumpy with big beans creating a knobby appearance.
We had a few of these last year which I don't think I prepared properly.
Looking for suggestions on how to work with this type.

Strings need to be removed, cooked longer than 15 minutes, cut French or cross wise?

Any help is appreciated.
I'm not a huge fan of green beans to start with, but have always enjoyed them when I use fresh beans from the produce or market.
These just look so different.

Help!
 
Posts: 2844 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Bozie
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From your description I can't help thinking they are just "regular" string beans that should have been picked sooner. As they mature the beans become more prominent and the shell toughens....


Martha

 
Posts: 7191 | Location: Montana | Registered: Mar 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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I agree with Martha (Bozie)I think they are beans that should have been picked sooner. I would fix them as my grandmother often did -- long simmered with ham or bacon,chopped onion, salt and pepper and sometimes a tablespoon of brown sugar to give them a little sweetness. You can add new potatoes if you want towards the end of cooking.

And Lurah, I wonder if you could dry them and eat the beans inside like dry beans?

Martha
 
Posts: 6348 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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You could just cook the shelled beans - discard the pods.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1221 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Oh, Seaborne -- that reminds me of my aunt -- the only green beans she liked was called "shelly beans" and they had some of the beans as well as the pods in them. I haven't thought of that in "forever" but that's what she always served -- and always canned! LOL!

Martha
 
Posts: 6348 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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Yes, Martha - and they are sweet and tender - and lovely - to cook with a bit of bacon or ham - though my folks simply dressed everything with garlic and olive oil.
Makes me think of fava beans too - which my Dad adored and grew in abundance. Even while very young, the lava beans are shelled - and tender and delicious. BUT - as they "mature," oh my - do they get tough. My father still loved them. They had to be cooked to death, until finally they were tender.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1221 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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Typo: Fava beans


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1221 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Seaborne -- favas are not popular here -- and I'm not sure I've ever seen them for sale. And as far as I know, I've never eaten them.

Martha
 
Posts: 6348 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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Not very popular many places. I hated them when I was a child. But in my "maturity," have learned to appreciate them more - though - rarely am I ever served them. I, myself, have only cooked them once or twice. My DH does not like them too well either. But they are lovely and buttery when very young - and often served only "in season" by good restaurants in our area.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1221 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Terrie Abbas
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Well to prepare heirloom green beans, you must go through some techniques, in summer season most mountain folks cook up a pot of green beans every day. It can be served with cornbread, a slab of fried tomatoes and cucumber salad sour with Himalayan salt and lemon in it. You can chopped it in small pieces.
 
Posts: 21 | Location: USA, Ohio Columbus | Registered: Aug 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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I used the beans like I do any other fresh green beans and they were fine, so I guess they were an heirloom variety. No one thought they were tough or old. Cleaned the last few for dinner last night and were still great.
 
Posts: 2844 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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