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Reviving grand recipes from years ago Sign In/Join 
Picture of Lurah
posted
We are fast forgetting about great recipes our parents and grandparents feasted on in first half of the last century and even some in the latter half.

What comes to mind for you from this category.

I think of Crab Louis. How about Grasshopper Pie.
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Indexlady
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Aspic anything.

Sweetbreads and other meats that used to be delicacies, either on their own or used in dishes.

Also, homemade broths made from various bones and cuts of meat: marrow bones, other bones, beef shanks, etc.

Braunschwieger (sp?) (which to me is milder than liverwurst.

Kifli and other European desserts.
 
Posts: 4404 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My Mother's homemade pot pie and noodles. Also navy beans and rivels.
 
Posts: 306 | Location:  | Registered: Apr 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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I still make mine -- just not as frequently -- to me, the classics never go out of style!

Martha
 
Posts: 5396 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Well, except for Peanut butter cookies -- I grew to not liking them as a kid and I've not eaten one since. (On purpose!) My DD grew up without peanut butter cookies!

Martha
 
Posts: 5396 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I still cook what I grew up eating!

Old fashion tea cakes! My home ec teacher's daughter stood beside her grandmother measuring ingredients DGM scooped and pinched. Absolutely delicious cookies!

Family favorites were slow baked ham and cornbread dressing, German chocolate cake, chocolate cream pie, banana pudding with Nabisco 'Nilla wafers not the cheap store brand with off-flavors, take the same banana pudding recipe and replace it with a can of drained crushed pineapple!, peanut butter cookies, homemade grape jelly and fig preserves.

Don't laugh - cooked poke salad. A fond little girl memory was getting my very own brown paper Piggly Wiggly sack and picking poke salad greens with my DGM and DM. Smile We "girl-talked" the day away. Wink

One thing I don't do often is fry. Fried chicken, chicken fried steak, fried pork chops, home fried potatoes, fried squash...I am now salivating!!!
 
Posts: 16458 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Kathy_in_wlsv
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Croquettes.

My vintage cookbooks have tons of croquette and "made" and "entre" dishes. I actually do make croquettes occasionally.

Fried Chicken about 4 times a year. real fried chicken WITH the skin fried in Crisco in a cast iron skillet. Fried breaded veal cutlets maybe once every couple years. Real home fried or cottage fried potatoes. Home made Apple sauce, apple butter and apple cake.

Welsh Rarebit I eat that maybe once a week.

Oyster stew, homemade broth, tongue, chicken gizzards, Chicken al a king, with pimentoes. I think maybe I got stuck in the 1920-50's


Life is GOOD!!
 
Posts: 1508 | Location: Upstate NY | Registered: Nov 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Lurah, Great topic! I didn't realize that Crab Louie was a thing of the past except here in land-locked Idaho where it is so difficult to get Dungeness Crab that is actually fresh ~ one of my all-time favorite dishes, btw.

I can think of a few dishes we seldom make any more - "Creamed Chip Beef on Toast" for one and "Fried Liver and Onions" for another = I ha*ted both of them and neither have ever crossed the door step into my kitchen since I was old enough to have my own kitchen. But, looking back, they were economical meals to make to provide for a family....

Think that might be the answer, it used to be that meals were cooked according to the family's finances and everyone ate or went hungry ~ far cry from today's world.

I'm seriously trying to think of some recipe from those years that people would willingly make today. I can't - anyone?
 
Posts: 6487 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cream Chipped Beef on Toast. Heck, that is another trip down memory lane. My mom used to make that. That was our "Lawless" supper on Monday evenings because my dad had to go see Dr. Lawless every Monday evening for awhile.

I don't think I've ever made it and never will.
 
Posts: 6052 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Kathy_in_wlsv
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S.O.S (creamed Chipped Beef).. yep I make that a few times a year. LOVE it. if I'm feeling Ritzy I add sliced hard boiled eggs to it. WE MUST be living in 1937 .


Life is GOOD!!
 
Posts: 1508 | Location: Upstate NY | Registered: Nov 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I must have 1 foot in the past as I make creamed chipped beef and peas on toast monthly- my hubby loves it and if I haven't planned a meal by 4pm, that is it. So easy to please him. Another of his favorites was a baked bean sandwich with cheese and bacon. Shows how low he went, when we first married in'64 and were poor as church mice, I fried in butter a slice of spam topped with brown sugar. That would make me gag today.
My mom always made salmon croquettes, homemade mac and cheese, and and tuna fish casserole when we were kids. I love all today but DH won't eat the fish meals.
 
Posts: 3051 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Jo-CT
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Gram and I would take a brown paperbag and comb the yard for dandilions. Blanch and sautee them in evoo with garlic. YUM.
 
Posts: 1314 | Location: Southwestern, CT | Registered: Aug 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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Has anyone ever had or made Lobster Thermidor?
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I read first half of last century I thought of the 1800's. LOL. Guess I haven't made past 2000yet. Smile

I would not consider lobster Thermidor a dish from the past. Who could afford to make it then?

I make everything my mother and grandmother made.....except squirrel. I do draw the line some where. Haven't made liver and onions for quite awhile. Might be about time.
 
Posts: 6719 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by metwo:
When I read first half of last century I thought of the 1800's. LOL. Guess I haven't made past 2000yet. Smile

I would not consider lobster Thermidor a dish from the past. Who could afford to make it then? QUOTE]

Lobster Thermidor was created in 1894 by Marie's, a Parisian restaurant near the theatre Comédie Française, to honour the opening of the play Thermidor by Victorien Sardou. Due to expensive and extensive preparation involved, Lobster Thermidor is usually considered a recipe primarily for special occasions. Lobster Thermidor is related to Lobster Newberg, created some 20 years earlier in the United States.

When I asked for GRAND recipes from the past, this is what I was thinking upon.
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Guess I misunderstood as the post said GREAT recipes. Each has their own definition of that.
 
Posts: 6719 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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The discussion title says "grand recipes from years ago," my opening line says "great recipes our parents & grandparents" would have enjoyed. Either way, I'd like to hear what some of those really old fabulous special occasion items were that we don't do much anymore or have never fixed for this generation.
 
Posts: 2639 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have had Lobster Thermidor on a number of occasions ~ every time on a fairly up-scale cruise ship. I have to say that I loved it but doubt that I could every duplicate it here at home! As for other great recipes from the grand old age? Wish I knew some but I don't ~ hope that some others might be able to share some here.... Cool
 
Posts: 6487 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Becky56
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I still make the same dishes that i grew up with. I dont care much at all for these trendy new foods.

Most of them have already been named.

I have my late MILs home ec book from the 30s. I love to look at it. It has some gross things, but also forgotten treasures too. I think as a whole we would have a lot less tummy troubles if we went back to these simpler foods and had the newer foodie dishes for special occasions.
 
Posts: 3193 | Location: Bama G.R.I.T.S. | Registered: Jun 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of zone9alady
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Like a lot of you I still enjoy dishes I grew up eating. In Louisiana the following have a long history in the culinary world. My father would go hunting or fishing and come home with the required ingredients. I have to admit mine are not as fresh, and picked up at my local grocery, hehe.
Although they take several hours to cook and have complicated recipes, I usually make them for special occasions.

Rabbit Etouffee
Turtle Sauce Piquant
Shrimp Creole
Venison Stew
Seafood Jambalaya
Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Forgot to add, the last time I made Crab Louis was when DH and I first met, I was cooking to impress! Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: zone9alady,


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Spanish Revival
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quote:
Originally posted by zone9alady:
for special occasions:

Seafood Jambalaya
Chicken and Sausage Gumbo


zone9alady, I would love these recipes if you would like to share!
 
Posts: 904 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of zone9alady
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http://www.chefpaul.com/site.p...D=300&cat=8&view=122

http://www.chefpaul.com/site.p...=300&cat=11&view=165

Since my scanner is broken on my printer I got the recipes I use from "Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen" cookbook from his website. I don't use his ready made spices and they are not advertised in his first book from 1984. They are mostly:

Salt
Garlic powder
Cayenne pepper
Black Pepper
White Pepper
Thyme
Oregano
and Bay leaves

Making an almost dark chocolate colored roux without burning it is the most difficult thing in the recipe for Gumbo. It took me a few tries to get it just right.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: zone9alady,


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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Back in the 80's I worked for a company with a corporate cafeteria and an executive cafeteria. On special occasions the lowly among us had lunch in the executive cafeteria and one of the items they always served was lobster Newberg. I would love to be able to recreate it - lobster, sherry, and the little sweet patty shells. YUM! The regular cafeteria served a version of welsh rarebit - they served toast with cheese sauce, bacon and sliced tomato. Heaven! And at Thanksgiving they put on a big feast for all the employees and one of the dishes was scalloped oysters served over dressing. I would love that recipe.

still prepare a number of my mother's recipes. However, I don't fry. I did by a Fry Daddy and will do shrimp or hush puppies once in a great moon. But I don't fry chicken. I hated the grease popping and just won't do it. Now I've found a restaurant that prepares real home style fried chicken - none of the Colonel's or Bo stuff - but home style. No heavy batter and 42 seasoning just salt flour and a hot pan of grease.

There is also a restaurant up in Calabash that prepares seafood much like my mother cooked. It is a hike, but worth it.

Southern food is pretty straight forward without a lot of fancy ingredients. If you have crab it's steamed or in crab cakes, if you have fish or shrimp it's fried, chicken is baked, fried or with dumplings. One thing, no matter how hard I try - I cannot make a real cat's head biscuit.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Charming,
 
Posts: 3393 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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I cook very few of the dishes I grew up eating. We don't have access to all the vegetables that we grew then (field peas, butterbeans, etc.) and DH doesn't like a lot of them. Frankly, I miss only a few of them -- like fried okra and maybe my mama's turnip greens.

I haven't made biscuits in a very long time. Never could make cat's heads. Now my Granny, she was the master of those!


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6197 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Becky56
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Speaking if southern food, tonight we are having chicken and dumplings and black eyed peas.
 
Posts: 3193 | Location: Bama G.R.I.T.S. | Registered: Jun 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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Florida Farm Girl - I find speckled butter beans in the freezer at my local grocer. They sometimes have field peas also. I loved my mother's fried okra - she did not bread hers but good old bacon fat and sliced okra in a hot cast iron skillet.

Becky - of all the things Southern I think I like black eye peas the least.
 
Posts: 3393 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Jo-CT
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quote:
Never could make cat's heads. Now my Granny, she was the master of those!


Please explain? I'm getting nasty images!!!
 
Posts: 1314 | Location: Southwestern, CT | Registered: Aug 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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LOL - They are fluffy biscuits with knobby tops.
 
Posts: 3393 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Only made Baked Alaska once at home. It wasn't that hard to do, but I don't have an occasion to make anymore.
 
Posts: 3047 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of zone9alady
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MMMM MM Fried Okra! LOL at the Cat's Heads, that was new to me also.


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Okra any way! Fried or slimey boiled. Wink

Fried green tomatoes! Fried squash.

I don't fry much any more either, but once or twice a season I try to have fried okra, green tomatoes, and squash.
 
Posts: 16458 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Here's a good illustration of the cat head biscuits.

http://foodiewife-kitchen.blog...scuits-say-what.html


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6197 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Spanish Revival
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quote:
Originally posted by zone9alady:

Making an almost dark chocolate colored roux without burning it is the most difficult thing in the recipe for Gumbo. It took me a few tries to get it just right.


Thank-You!!
 
Posts: 904 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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One thing I used to enjoy but you rarely see is real cooked fudge. The stuff made with marshmallow crème is just too sweet and gooey for me. I love the buttery chocolate of real fudge.
 
Posts: 3393 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Kathy_in_wlsv
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I make the REAL Hershey's cooked fudge a few times a year. I saved the back of the Hershey's box AND found the recipe in my cookbook called "Recipes from the backs of boxes, bags and tins."

It's the first fudge I ever made or tasted and to me it's the only fudge.

Yummm Don't bother trying to make it when it's humid though.. it will never set. you can drink it though..(learned from experience)


Life is GOOD!!
 
Posts: 1508 | Location: Upstate NY | Registered: Nov 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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My mom made something called "city chicken" it was chunks of pork, veal and beef (?) skewered. Hash, which I hated.

My favorite dessert of hers was lemon snow. Custard over beaten egg whites

We didn't eat meat on Friday so dinner that night was often fried haddock bought from a nearby store that I think made only that (maybe French fries too)

This makes me think of something else. We ate in the dining room and our plates were dished up and served at the table by our father. Even if we had something as simple as fried eggs!
 
Posts: 12135 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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zone, I'm in Louisiana and we mostly cook from scratch in my kitchen. My daughter's boyfriend and I have a great time trying new recipes whenever they visit. This time, they had picked gobs of blackberries near his home outside Thibodaux, so we had blackberry pie, blackberry topping for pancakes, ice cream, etc. Earlier this year, we decided that a shrimp and poached egg gumbo would be just the thing. And it was! I was surprised at how easy it was. We just slipped the eggs in and they did fine in the gently bubbling gumbo.

My FIL made the BEST turtle sauce piquant I ever tasted. He also made his own boudin from his own pigs--hard to believe he was actually a doctor! He never got over growing up on the farm, I guess....
 
Posts: 3234 | Location: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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