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ISO apricot treat for gift Sign In/Join 
Picture of CA Lori
posted
For upcoming SIL's birthday, I'd like to make him something with his favorite fruit--apricot. I think I made him an apricot pie last year with canned apricots and I could make that again (if I remember correctly, it was quite good). But I thought someone here might have some suggestions.

I plan to also do a google search for apricot dessert of some kind.
 
Posts: 6062 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Apricot fried pies is/are Wink my DHs all time favorite dessert. Doesn't matter what I bake/make he will say, This is good, but it's not apricot fried pies.

I also make a "cheater" dessert...crescent rolls, apricot preserves, and other GOOD stuff:

Apricot Crescent Ring

1 cup Almonds , finely ground
1/2 cup Powdered Sugar
2 tablespoons Butter
1 teaspoon Almond Extract
1 Egg separated
2 8 ounce cans Crescent Rolls
2/3 cup Apricot Preserves (or peach preserves)
1/4 cup Almonds sliced
1 tablespoon Sugar

Heat oven to 350 degrees. In medium bowl, combine ground almonds, powdered sugar, butter, almond extract and egg yolk; mix well. (Mixture will be stiff.) Set aside. Separate 1 can of dough into 8 triangles. Place triangles in ungreased 12-inch pizza pan; press over bottom to form crust. Seal perforations.
Separate remaining dough into 8 triangles. Spread 1 rounded
tablespoon of almond filling over each triangle. Roll up starting
at shortest side of triangle and rolling to opposite point.
Arrange filled crescents point side down evenly around edge of
dough-lined pan. Spoon preserves evenly over center of dough, spreading just to filled rolls. Beat egg white until frothy; brush on tops of filled crescents. Sprinkle almonds and sugar on top.

Bake at 350 degrees for 25 - 30 minutes or until golden brown. Cut into wedges (I cute into 16 wedges). Serve warm. TIP: Ground almonds can be made by grinding blanched almonds in a nut mill, food processor, or blender.

** I have started lining the pizza pan with parchment, makes transferring to a nice serving plate easier.

Everyone in the family enjoys this but especially my stepS. I made this at their house Christmas. He ate the first piece and the last.
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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OH! Here's my slab pie recipe:
Apricot Cherry Slab Pie

3 1/4 cups Flour
1 teaspoon Salt
1 cup lard and butter mixture
1 Egg Yolk
Milk
1/2 cup Sugar
3 tablespoons Cornstarch
3 (15 1/4 oz) cans apricot halves, drained and cut into quarters
1 (16-oz) can pitted tart red cherries, drained

1. For pastry, in a large mixing bowl stir together the flour and salt. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Lightly beat egg yolk in a glass measuring cup. Add enough milk to egg yolk to make 3/4 cup total liquid; mix well. Stir egg yolk mixture into flour mixture; mix well. Set aside one-third of the dough.
2. On a lightly floured surface, roll remaining two-thirds of dough into an 18x12-inch rectangle. To transfer pastry, carefully wrap it around the rolling pin; unroll into a 14x10x1-inch baking pan (pastry will hang over edges of pan). Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
3. In a large bowl combine sugar and cornstarch. Stir in apricots and cherries. Spoon into the prepared crust.
4. Roll the remaining dough into a 16x11-inch rectangle; place over fruit. Bring bottom pastry up and over top pastry. Seal edges with the tines of a fork. ***** top pastry over entire surface with the tines of a fork.
5. Bake about 40 minutes or until golden brown. Cool in pan on a wire rack. Serve warm or cool. Drizzle with Vanilla Glaze. Cut into 2x3-inch bars.

 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Then there's the time consuming Scandinavian Pastry recipe I got off the Julia in the Kitchen television show.

The recipe is a long one, so here's my blog post about it with pictures!
http://keepyouinstitches.blogs...day-and-napkins.html

 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Sherry, thanks for all the suggestions. Is that Almond Crescent Ring good the next day? The reason I ask is that I'd like to try making something other than Monkey Bread for my boating group on a Saturday morning cruiseout. I don't like having to get up early (especially on a very cold morning) to assemble and bake Monkey Bread (it's not good the next day, at least that's my opinion).

I've pretty much decided to make Lurah's Dried Fruit Cream Scones for my SIL using dried apricots and dried cranberries (Craisins). I don't know how that is reheated the next day, but I guess I'll find out!

Since my parents were from Norway, I'm going to have to look at your Scandinavian Pastry recipe. I always like Scandinavian desserts.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CA Lori,
 
Posts: 6062 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Of course, it's best the day that it's baked, but it does okay the next day. What I did, was make the almond butter at home and refrigerate it. I took the rest of the ingredients with us to assemble and bake at their home...just let the almond butter come to room temperature.

The Scandinavian Pastry recipe is time consuming but OH SO worth it!

I did several different fillings when I made it...apricot filling in some...fig preserves! in some. They were ALL good. However, sigh, as DH munched on an apricot pastry he said, "These are good but not as good as fried pies." eyeroll I ate my fill and passed them out to DM and friends to sample. A BFF whose DM also made apricot fried pies said that I could do fried pies for DH but to bring her all the Scandinavian pastries! Wink That flakey crust compared to fried pie dough...oh yeah!!!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KeepYouInStitches,
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Sherry, I don't think I'm grasping the directions of your Almond Crescent Ring. I understand you to say that you line a 12" round pizza pan with the first can of triangles that you press together to make a round sheet. Then you take the second can of triangles and leave those 8 triangles separate, then fill and roll them up. And now you lay those 8 filled crescents evenly around the outer edge of the bottom "sheet" that has been laid out on the pizza pan. Then you place the apricot preserves on only the center of the bottom crust. So, to me, it looks like you wind up with 16 wedges of a baked bottom crust that has a crescent rolls sitting around the outer edge and apricot filling extending to the point of the wedge from the edge of the crescents. This to me would look like a very weird wedge!

I did a google search for Apricot Crescent Ring and the recipes I looked at all called for one can of crescent rolls that you fill and roll up.
 
Posts: 6062 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I'm looking online too and can't find a picture, but yes. It looks like a "pizza" with big stuffed cheese crust edges.

I always cut each slice into two slices making 16 instead of 8.

I can't believe I don't have a picture of one I've baked anywhere...and nothing is showing up online...
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Well! I may have to make another just for photos to show you. Sigh...such a hardship. Wink
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Tea Lover
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The Almond Crescent Ring sounds very good, but just in case you need another idea here is a recipe that is a little different. I think of this as an appetizer more than a dessert, but it is a little sweet. When I used Sunsweet brand dried apricots I thought it was too sweet. Trader Joe’s dried apricots are much better.


Apricot-Cheese Truffles

4 oz cream cheese, softened
8 oz shredded Swiss cheese
1/2 cup finely chopped dried apricots
1/8 tsp ground white pepper
3/4 cup finely chopped pecans, toasted

Beat cream cheese in a large bowl at medium speed of an electric mixer until creamy; stir in Swiss cheese. Add apricots and pepper, stirring well.

Shape cheese mixture into 40 (3/4 inch) balls. Roll balls in pecans, pressing firmly so pecans adhere. Serve at room temperature.
 
Posts: 591 | Location: So Calif | Registered: Feb 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of joyluck
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Would he enjoy apricot pancake syrup or apricot leather treats? I've never made either but used to buy a really nice apricot syrup which is wonderful on pancakes or waffles.


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12750 | Location: north of 50 in Canada zone3b | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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SIL likes anything apricot!

And he really liked Lurah's Dried Fruit Scones, which I believe is a Fannie Farmer recipe. Next time, I'm going to try to make some kind of a mock Clotted Cream. either with the cream cheese or the sour cream. DH put jelly on his but I wanted to be able to taste the pure flavor of the scones w/o slathering them with jelly.

I just might make those Apricot-Cheese Truffles for our next cruiseout. How do you chop your apricots? I found it to be a bit of a chore to use a knife and am wondering if a food processor wouldn't do a better job of it. And finding a block of swiss cheese to grate isn't easy either. Sliced swiss is available everywhere, but how do you shred that?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: CA Lori,
 
Posts: 6062 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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CA Lori, I use my kitchen shears to snip dried apricots. They don't chop well at all.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6738 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I went back and read the online Apricot Crescent Ring recipe on Pillsbury.com.

I beat you could do that without the first step of "my" recipe - mashing the triangle together in a pizza pan. You could probably use preserves too...put a dollop on the crescent roll then the almond mixture. Roll, seal, and bake. I may have to try that. It would be more portable.

I use kitchen shears to cut dried apricots too.
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Tea Lover
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I just use a knife to cut up the apricots. It may take a little time, but I don’t do it very often. Haven’t tried the food processor, but you could give it a try, just pulsing it. I have had no trouble finding a block of swiss cheese, so I don’t know where I bought it, probably at either Ralph’s or Trader Joe’s. If you have a hard time finding the swiss, try the recipe with a different cheese - might be even better.
 
Posts: 591 | Location: So Calif | Registered: Feb 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CA Lori
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Good thinking, Tea Lover. Swiss cheese is not my favorite. In my google travels, I read that Jack cheese would be a good substitute for swiss--I love Jack cheese!

I also found a tip for chopping apricots. The video showed the chef using what looked like an 8" chef's knife, but she first sprayed it with Pam. The fruit did not stick to the blade at all! I have arthritis in my hands and I wouldn't be able to cut too many apricots before my aching hands would force me to quit.
 
Posts: 6062 | Location: Calif. | Registered: Sep 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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