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Hot Cross Buns Sign In/Join 
Picture of Linderhof
posted
A tradition as a child on Easter Sunday for breakfast but as an adult more churches are feeding their congregation breakfast on Easter so . . . years ago I switched to Good Friday breakfast with leftovers for afternoon tea.

I've always bought them in the city (you cannot find them here) but alas, this year we were not going to the city close enough to Easter to get the buns so . . . I made them for the first time this year.

My opinion -- I will NEVER buy them again!

So breakfast this morning, my helpers for "elevenses" and afternoon tea this morning all included hot cross buns!

Oh, and my Mom wasn't a yeast baker -- she always bought hers -- so I was just carrying on that tradition! LOL!

Martha
 
Posts: 5978 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Would you share your recipe?
 
Posts: 7071 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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When you get a breather, please do share your recipe. I'd always buy them at our local bakery. Last time I did Easter breakfast at church I served them and had many compliments, one from visiting parents from out of state who claimed they were the best she'd ever found in the big city. Now the bakery is closed, so I thought I'd make them myself. Haven't done the research yet.
As our Easter family celebration was held on Palm Sunday, I'm planning a couple favorite breakfast meals this weekend, one with a Kringle I had shipped.
 
Posts: 2760 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Here's the recipe I used. I did make some changes -- rapid yeast and golden raisins and reg raisins (as currants are often hard to find here)

They were really good!

Martha

HOT CROSS BUNS

2 packages powdered yeast (I used quick rise)
1/3 c. warm water
1/3 c. scalded milk
1/2 c. butter
1/3 c. sugar
1/4 t. salt
3 1/2 to 4 cups flour
1 t. cinnamon
3 well beaten eggs
2/3 c. dried currants, golden raisins or regular raisins (I used half golden, half regular -- currants are
hard to find here on the prairie)

Soften yeast in water. Into the scalded milk, stir the butter, sugar and salt; let cool to lukewarm in a large bowl.

Sift flour and cinnamon together. Into the milk mixture, stir a cup of flour and mix well. Add eggs and beat well, then add the softened yeast and the currants (or raisins). Add the remaining flour, a cup or so at a time and mix thoroughly to make a soft dough. Cover with a clean dampened towel and let rise in a warm place until double, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Punch down.

Roll dough 1/2 inch thick on a lightly floured board. Cut into rounds with a biscuit or cooky cutter and shape into 24 rounded buns. Place well apart on a greased baking sheet. Cover and let rise in a warm place for an hour. With a sharp knife or scissors, cut a cross in the center of each bun. Brush tops with egg white or milk. Bake in a 375 oven about 12 minutes or until nicely browned.

Remove from the pan and pipe or dribble white frosting on buns to make a cross. Frosting is made by stirring together until smooth, 1 lightly beaten egg white and enough powdered sugar to make a paste (3/4 to 1 cup); add 1/2 t. vanilla.
 
Posts: 5978 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of pinecone476
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I bet your kitchen smelled wonderful too. I almost bought some at the grocery store but at over 6$ for the package that held 6, I nixed it. DH doesn't care for them and I didn't really *need* 6 of them. Our local bakery is open only in the summer while the tourists are here. Frown

piney
 
Posts: 3203 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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Linderhof - My Hot Cross buns just came out of the oven. I had trouble making the cut in the rolls, they deflated, so let them rise again. I ended up using scissors, as I don't own a lame, YET! Do you use one? My razor blades are all dull from much use.
 
Posts: 2760 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Lurah, I used scissors and mine didn't deflate, but perhaps yours rose higher than mine!

And no, I don't own a lame and probably won't using the scissors for the buns and a knife for any bread that I need to slash.

Martha
 
Posts: 5978 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Seaborne
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I have put this Hot Cross Buns recipe into my files - I collect them. I've made them many times when I had lots of people around to eat them. Now, I don't dare make them because my DH and I would pig-out on them. The big treat for me is my Easter Bread - which is really like giant Hot Cross Buns - 6 inches rise - in a 9-inch round pan.
When the pans are ready to bake, I brush an egg wash over all - then, I cut into them - very - very - carefully - first with a sharp knife - but I finish with scissors. It's a tricky maneuver to accomplish without deflation.
I made four of these giant breads - and 2 smaller rounds and one loaf-size.


Seaborne
 
Posts: 1158 | Location: Pacific Northwest | Registered: Nov 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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They rose beautifully, and my new Wustof knife wasn't even sharp enough to slash to tops, and the scissors quickly made a mess of the rising.
They tasted fine, but next time will do something different, I don't know what.
 
Posts: 2760 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Did you try a serrated knife to cut the buns? That might work. Just guessing here, knowing that a regular knife might just mash on it.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6628 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Bozie
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quote:
They rose beautifully, and my new Wustof knife wasn't even sharp enough to slash to tops, and the scissors quickly made a mess of the rising.
They tasted fine, but next time will do something different, I don't know what.


I'm not at all in the same cooking class as the rest of you here but way back when I did successful baking I used a wet, sharp knife to make the cut in the tops. Sharp was good for cutting the dough and wet was good for keeping the blade from sticking on it. Just a gentle touch of the blade, then pull it along..


Martha

 
Posts: 7129 | Location: Montana | Registered: Mar 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Lurah
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Yesterday went out to lunch with a friend and a block down is the local kitchen shop so I popped in to buy a lame (pronounced lahm) or grignette. They had them and were out but one is on order for me now.
 
Posts: 2760 | Location: Midwest | Registered: Nov 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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Good Lurah -- I'm glad you got one!

Martha
 
Posts: 5978 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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