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posted
When you work all day? I've got it easy--I get an orphan puppy, care for it, try to housebreak it, get it used to being with other dogs--and then send it on to its forever home.

My daughter brought home a beautiful puppy, whom I know she loves very much. But I think she's considering sending him back now, after 2-3 months, because he's too much for her to deal with.

He's about 5 months old, a big goofy chocolate lab kind of dog who is wild and unruly.

She half-way tried crating, but gave it up when he chewed his way out of it.

I feel that Cesar Millans method of "exercise,discipline, affection" would be a good rule to follow with him, but not sure I can get her on board. I've tried to get her to sign up for classes at Petco but she doesn't seem receptive.

I can work with him some a few times each week, but he needs her to do it, and she needs to make the commitment---I have 8 dogs of my own.

Any suggestions on how to make this work? (She and her husband live next door.)
 
Posts: 51 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A pup may just have required just too much of a commitment of time for her (at this time in her life). No easy way to say this other than it may be best for her and the pup, for it to find a new home?

A more mature adult dog (already trained, possibly smaller) with a sweet loving personality would have probably been a better fit for her. There are so many that are desperate for homes, through no fault of their own?
 
Posts: 9432 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Should have mentioned this before ---she already has 2 adult rescues that have been with them for several years.
 
Posts: 51 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Then I would give this new pup the best possible situation, and look out for its benefit. The longer she keeps it, the harder it could be to place in a great home with someone who has the time to train it?

We all fall easily in love with puppies...but raising/training one can be a whole different story.
 
Posts: 9432 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Have to say that I think conrad is right here. Nothing against your daughter's kind heart and her love for this pup BUT sometimes reality needs to be considered. Either she needs to commit the time and effort it takes to properly train a puppy or, do the best thing for the puppy, and place it with someone who does have the time while it is still young.

I have nothing but admiration for your daughter's desire to provide a home for this puppy but it can be very difficult to train one when trying to work long hours away from the home. A possible solution might be for you to provide "doggy day care" but since you already have 8 dogs of your own, I hesitate to suggest that as a remedy. Good Luck!
 
Posts: 6487 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes, I can let him out to run every day with my dogs, which we already do in the afternoons, and I *could* do some obedience work with him to help out.

But I didn't adopt him---she did. If she took the initiative I'd be glad to help out. I'm still waiting on that though.

And when he's at my house he's chasing and catching my chickens. Not good.g
 
Posts: 51 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Lady's mom:

My daughter brought home a beautiful puppy, whom I know she loves very much. But I think she's considering sending him back now, after 2-3 months, because he's too much for her to deal with.



She sounds compassionate & realistic. I would support her decision.
 
Posts: 9432 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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She needs to do what is best for the pup.

I do not endorse the Cesar Milan way of training. I've read enough about what happens when he enters the home and first meets the dog. They don't film that part. Firm and consistent behavior without bullying is the way to go. I do agree that the owner must be the one that actually participates in the training sessions.
 
Posts: 3048 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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But surely you can't disagree with the "exercise-discipline-affection" way of working with a dog? This is what we're trying, and I believe it's helping.

First I take him out for a long hard run -at least 30 minutes- with my dogs. Then she calls him home, gives him a treat when he comes to her, then works him on a leash for a few minutes, and then cuddle with him.

We've been doing this about a week, and it does seem to be working.

She still needs to take obedience classes.
 
Posts: 51 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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