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Heartworm treatment Sign In/Join 
Picture of patty louise
posted
Has anyone been through this with a dog? We just got a rescue lab & the treatments start in couple of weeks. I am so worried.

Could use some advice & encouragement.
 
Posts: 10426 | Location: Mechanicsville Virginia | Registered: Jan 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Indexlady
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I've been there.

All will be well AT THE END, provided the dog is well enough to go through it, which your vet should know.

I think all vets have their own way of dealing with it. We had to leave our doggie at the vet for the first week, perhaps even two weeks. (It's been a while). Afterwards, we had to take him in weekly for a few weeks.

It was about an 8 to 10 week ordeal, and the heartworms were babies, not adults.

But, at the END, he was a well, happy doggie.

And, the cost was well over 1-000. We are NOT living in a high-cost area.

OUR vet always low-balls the initial quote for anything like this. When he gives us a quote, we've learned it's going to be double--for heartworm, when our cat was injured, when another doggie broke a leg, etc.

If you are DIY, I have NO IDEA on how that goes.

It's hard on the pets physically. It's hard on the owner/caregiver emotionally and financially.

Good luck for you and poochie.
 
Posts: 4598 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of patty louise
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Thank you so much.

We are trying to get her healthy enough for the treatments. She is a 4 year old lab & only weighed 46 lbs when we got her. She has gained about 15 lbs in 3 weeks.

I am so concerned about the recovery period because she is very hyper having lived in a pen most of her life. We will do all we can. They are keeping her 2 nights.
 
Posts: 10426 | Location: Mechanicsville Virginia | Registered: Jan 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Indexlady
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The vet felt our doggie needed to be put in a small pen/crate to contain, in order to not stress the heart or body during the treatment/recovery time. Our doggie couldn't play, be roused up, nothing.

That might also be why keeping our doggie there was better for him.

He had been a wild outdoor doggie and he refused crating, doggie houses, etc. Also, he was 70 pounds and he was/is close to being wild and untrained and has a mind of his own about what will be done to him.

So, I'm sure all of that played a part in his treatment.

It's really an individualized treatment, based a lot on doggie temperment.

But the reduced activity level is why reason it can be hard. We humans want them to exercise and be happy, run around. For our doggie, it was the worst thing possible.

Since crating was a major issue with him, the vet felt THEY could keep him quiet, even with dr-ugs, if necessary.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Indexlady,
 
Posts: 4598 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of patty louise
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I wish they would keep Sally longer. We have another lab & she loves to play. I guess that will be the hardest part.
 
Posts: 10426 | Location: Mechanicsville Virginia | Registered: Jan 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do your homework. There is lots of info out there on the stages of HW infection.

Ask your vet questions. Has he looked for microfillaria (young worms). How heavy is the infestation? Is he going to give an antibiotic for two weeks prior to treatment? (Doxycycline )
What is he treating with? Arsenic or ivermectin?

There are different ways to treat based on the amount of infection. Don't be harder on your dog (OR your pocketbook) than you need to be.
 
Posts: 69 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of patty louise
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They only saw one adult worm. I think she said Ivermectin. And yes, Salley is taking Doxycycline. Last dose is today. Treatments start May 19.

Thank you Lady's mom for the advice and encouragement!
 
Posts: 10426 | Location: Mechanicsville Virginia | Registered: Jan 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good deal! Sounds like she knows what she's doing. Some vets don't know or care that they have options.
 
Posts: 69 | Registered: Mar 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of patty louise
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Posts: 10426 | Location: Mechanicsville Virginia | Registered: Jan 26, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Indexlady
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Hope all is/goes well with your doggie!
 
Posts: 4598 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Go for the slow kill (ivermectin) treatment. It's so much easier on the dog. They can live a normal life during treatment. Not to mention the cost is MUCH MORE affordable.
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: May 18, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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