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  And I thought it was called "stippling"
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And I thought it was called "stippling" Sign In/Join 
Picture of bluesnail
posted
I got a new catalog in the mail which had a variety of quilts offered. Prices range from $99 to $120. The 'expensive' ones were described as being "hand pieced and hand quilted'. The other ones were described as having "meticulous vermicelli" quilting.

Vermicelli - hum....isn't that a type of Italian pasta???? or is it a sort of rice????

Oh, wait- I think that word actually describes a worm - ugh! So I looked closely at their "worm track quilting" and lo and behold! It's just stippling? Who knew?


Sometimes I laugh so hard tears run down my leg! Lois
 
Posts: 2195 | Location: sunny Florida | Registered: Aug 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of owie
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I get that mixed up with meandering. Always thought they looked the same---or maybe it is my eyes.
 
Posts: 15218 | Location: Harford county, MD, zone 6 | Registered: May 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of PatV82
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Made in China right? I have never seen a quilt sold in a catalog that was hand pieced - they may have put the pieces by hand on the machine, but not used hand stitches to put the pieces together.

I always thought there was a difference between stippling and meandering. Ok, so we need a longarm quilter to jump in...


www.pinterest.com/patv82

personallybypat.tumblr.com
 
Posts: 425 | Location: Aurora, Illinois | Registered: Jan 03, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Shawkl
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The style is the same...but meandering has more space showing...it is therefore larger. Stippling has less space showing because it is closer together...and therefore smaller in scale.
 
Posts: 4614 | Location: Alabama | Registered: Nov 26, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of warm buns
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Am I wrong or right? Meandering is larger than stippling but stippling lines do not cross over or touch each other and sometimes Meandering does.

Like a pattern with lines and loops is meandering?

These are all questions, now not answers. I am still in the learning stages also.
 
Posts: 3614 | Location: Elvis, birthplace | Registered: Nov 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Lines do not cross for both classic meandering and stippling. The distance between quilting lines is either 1/8 or 1/4 inch maximum for stippling (I don't remember specifically which one). Generally meandering is the one where the lines are 1/2 inch or greater between the quilting lines. Meandering and stippling both look more like puzzle pieces. They don't look like wavy worms (there are patterns that do--a filler quilting design).

Loops with crossing quilting lines are mostly called "filler" quilting designs. There are tons and tons and tons of these type of designs. More than one "filler" pattern can be used in a background. Some but not all filler designs cross other lines of stitching.

Echo quilting is a line of stitching around a shape. There can be more than one echo. You can even "echo" around a quilted shape.

These types of designs are usually done freehand (not traced in any way, paper chalk, etc.). Some freehand designs benefit from some "placement" guidelines. An example of a placement line would be a chalked in straight line--when freehand quilting a design like a big loop then a small loop, the placement line could be used as a guide for the top of the small loops (placement lines help you judge distances).

All of these things I am describing are done with free motion (setting up your machine with the feeddogs down so you quilt easily moves under the foot of the machine). With freemotion quilting you control the stitching--the needle moves up and down while you position the quilt and control where the stitches are placed along with the size of the stitches.

Hope this helps!
 
Posts: 1092 | Location: Wisconsin | Registered: Aug 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of royalboomer
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I understand the difference - now if I could only be patient enough to learn to do the different types Smile
 
Posts: 6466 | Location: Great Midwest | Registered: Oct 29, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of SeeingStars
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I'm laughing with Lois at this description. Meticulous worm tracks! Bahahahahaaaa!
Smile guessing this marketing ad was written by a non-quilter and possibly a non-English speaking person as well.
 
Posts: 3552 | Location: North Alabama | Registered: Dec 06, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of EvelynB
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Jay Leno and Consumer Digest have humorous translated instructions from other languages.

I had lots if quilts decorating my classroom and our art teacher would send students down to see what quilters called "stippling". It's not what they called it.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stippling
 
Posts: 7042 | Registered: Mar 31, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of pinecone476
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I wonder if the stitches are big enough to throw a cat through.

So true, Evelyn. Stippling in painting is more like taking a lightly loaded round flat tipped brush and pouncing so the background peeks through.


piney
 
Posts: 3127 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Getting back to the original post - I did a little searching and found this

"Pioneering work in making machine quilting more acceptable was carried out by quiltmakers such as Harriet Hargrave and Barbara Barber, to name only a few. Following in their footsteps came a tidal wave of machine quilted quilts stitched with the now overused ‘vermicelli’ or ‘meander’ stitching, .."

reprinted here
http://www.popularpatchwork.co...positive-option/7245
from an article by C June Barnes that was published in 2000.


Martha

 
Posts: 7005 | Location: Montana | Registered: Mar 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of bluesnail
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See! You really do learn new things on this board. I had never heard the word "vermicelli" used in quilting: meandering- yes; stippling -yes.
Thanks Bozie for clearing up that phrase for me. Maybe I'll make a few 'worm tracks' on my next FM quilt.


Sometimes I laugh so hard tears run down my leg! Lois
 
Posts: 2195 | Location: sunny Florida | Registered: Aug 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Downsouth
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If you want to get it quilted faster, you meander. If you have more time and want a closer quilting design, you stipple. You can do both in the same quilt. I have only stippled one quilt by machine (free motion) and the stitches were so close it felt stiff to me.


Devonne



 
Posts: 14932 | Location: Georgia | Registered: Jan 24, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of GAQuilter
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Learn something new everyday! Big Grin


Group Hug

I can do what you can’t do, and you can do what I can’t do; together we can do great things.— Mother Teresa

http://picasaweb.google.com/GAquilter
 
Posts: 2605 | Location: GA | Registered: Jul 06, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of NICUnurse
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Well now that we cleared that up! Thanks for the lesson!!

BTW-Vermicelli is my favorite pasta for spaghetti. I don't like the fat spaghetti noodles. Unless, they're flat like Fettuccine or broader noodles but those aren't for traditional spaghetti. Try it-I promise you will like it!!

PamSmile
 
Posts: 5712 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: Jan 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of wildcatmom
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NICU, I'm with you on the fat pasta...myself, I'm a fan of angel hair pasta. What kind of stitching do you think that would that be?


~karen Wave
 
Posts: 3153 | Location: SE KS | Registered: Jul 28, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of quiltbea
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Another fact about quilting:
If you want a stiffer quilt, you quilt closer together, as in stippling. The closer the stippling, the stiffer the quilt piece.

If you want it softer, meander with larger space between the stitching.
 
Posts: 13275 | Location: Southwestern Maine Zone 5 U.S.A. | Registered: Dec 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of NICUnurse
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Wildcat- that could be angeling-ROFL!!

Quiltbea-excellent advice and an easy way to remember!

PamSmile
 
Posts: 5712 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: Jan 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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