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posted
They have been all the rage for the past 10 years. I personally see them as lazyness from a design and build perspective. I don't see them aging well, and I don't like them much, although if done right it can be good, and seem better suited to smaller houses, and seem really awkward when done with large homes.

I'm sure many will differ, thoughts?
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My house is I guess what could be called as a 'semi-open' concept. The kitchen and family room are open to one another and I hate it. I wish I had a kitchen that was its own room. Not only to hide a mess, but for decorating purposes as well. But then my favorite type of house is one built in the 1930s so there you go Smile
 
Posts: 319 | Registered: Aug 20, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I thought I was the only one in the world who did not want an open concept kitchen. I do not want to entertain in the kitchen. I like to work in there, with music turned up loud, ALONE.
We do have an eatin kitchen but when we entertain we love to use our dining room.
 
Posts: 268 | Registered: Jan 01, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ewww, little boxes! a formal living room, dining room will never meet our family's lifestyle. Nor would a kitchen & small IMO useless "family room" configuration.

Maybe it's a western thing, we want a large greatroom, preferably open to the kitchen. Big Grin of course, adagent mud room/ laundry w/sink, toilet & shower. If I were house hunting, I'd settle for smaller bedrooms (murphy bed) and no on suite master bath.
In the meantime, I'm satisfied! 18x24 living room, adequate kitchen; indoor laundry room has no bath. IMO better one less bathroom if no mortgage, no?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: tessa89,
 
Posts: 5029 | Location: NE of S.F. | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Except for the older homes in Austin, most of the homes here are open concept with many of them having the entertaining area one huge room with the kitchen set off by a long island or bar. I love this type of plan, but will say I'd like to have a formal living room also. I dislike little boxes that separate all the rooms - I'm claustrophobic and definitely need space. I could easily see living in a large loft where there were only "suggestions" of rooms (except, of course for the bathrooms). If I still had kids at home I'd probably not be as quick to embrace a loft, but for just me it sounds pretty good!
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I love EVERYTHING open! The only rooms that are not are the bedrooms and bathrooms. LOL! I had sketched my dream home on a 8x11 sheet of paper in the late 70's, and still have it in a binder today. It's funny, though not at all like the house I have now...but the concept is the same.
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by klinkdog:
I personally see them as lazyness from a design and build perspective.
I'm sure many will differ, thoughts?


I guess for a small home it would be more cost effective to have less interior walls and it makes sense having more visual space, but as far as it being lazy, actually the architect and builder have to take an extra caution and special care when spanning such large spaces with a roof when not having any interior walls to help with support. I had to have special trusses ordered, prefabed and set in place with a huge crane to accomodate the spans. Also, some of the electrical installation is run through conduit in the slab before it is poured for outlets in the floor.

Lazy..no, more complicated....yes! Wink
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Talk about open-ness...Not only do I like an open floor plan...I don't even use curtains. They are hanging at the windows, but never closed unless we have company in the guest bedroom. I don't know why they close the curtains...we are far enough off the road and on a hill...you can't even see the road from the house.
 
Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by KeepYouInStitches:
Talk about open-ness...Not only do I like an open floor plan...I don't even use curtains.


LOL...me neither! I have 6 sets of French doors in the rear of the house...nothing on them.
I have had raccoons and squirrels as Peeping-Toms!


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Our mountain home has an open kitchen/dining/living space. I never thought I would have liked it either. But I am convinced it can depend on variables like the home/site/views/ceiling height as well as individual habits and preferences in cooking.

It is good for me, because I do tend to keep it much more clean/organized than if the kitchen was not open to view.

I do cook, but not elaborate meals except for Thanks Giving, for example. I really like the large island for prep/storage and bar stool use. The views in this home are fabulous through very large windows. I would miss seeing the wildlife and mountains if I only had the kitchen window. We have top/down bottom/up cellular blinds so control of both privacy and sun are easy.

So count me as one who likes it....at least in the current/above conditions. Wink
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by tessa89:no on suite master bath.
You must be kidding. NO on suite MB? How is this possible? Share a sink with a hubby, how will the marriage last? No, no. Much better to buy a house way over what I can afford, worry about how to make the payments, stress continuously about money, and sit in the on suite that is larger than most city apartments because that's the way it's supposed to be? Next, you'll be saying that a vinyl floor is actually acceptable in a laundry room? Better go, time to burn my house down Big Grin . No open concept, vinyl floors, no on-suite. I'm happy with what I have and the little mortgage that's left on it. Smile
 
Posts: 1924 | Location: Northern New Jersey | Registered: Mar 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by klinkdog:
They have been all the rage for the past 10 years. I personally see them as lazyness from a design and build perspective. I don't see them aging well, and I don't like them much, although if done right it can be good, and seem better suited to smaller houses, and seem really awkward when done with large homes.

I'm sure many will differ, thoughts?


Though I love older/vintage homes, I'm definitely in the "open" group! And, I don't think open floor plans are a sign of laziness. Neither are they a passing fad that won't age well.

In my current home, the kitchen is separated from the family room by a wide bar, which allows the cook (me) to be part of the family, see the TV, if desired and allows more light and views. The kitchen is also open to the living room via a wide arch, which again connects the cook to what's happening in there, while allowing me, the cook, to enjoy the view from the large front window. If I had my druthers, I'd probably go for all one BIG kitchen/dining/family room/living room combo space.

The good thing is that there are many styles of homes available and one can choose whatever style suits them. To each his own, eh?
Smile
 
Posts: 2499 | Location: SoCal, Gardening/climate zones 9 or 23 | Registered: Feb 13, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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IMO curtains & drapes are dust magnets. The first thing I did when moving into this house was replace the previous owner's expensive "custom" drapes with plantation shutters - vaccuum and done!
When bedroom windows were replaced I would have preferred the type with between-the-pane privacy feature....too costly then. Maybe next summer.
And yes, I did have new vinly flooring installed in the indoor laundry room which opens onto a rear patio & relatively large yard. No worries if/when paws track in mud, leaves, dirt Big Grin

BTW, custom and semi custom home builders began offering open design (kitchen & greatroom) in the mid 1960s. As Zone9 explained, much more expensive to construct. popcorn ceilings were/are hiding a multitude of short cuts tho

This message has been edited. Last edited by: tessa89,
 
Posts: 5029 | Location: NE of S.F. | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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also another point , my hubby likes to lay on the couch and snooze and he dont want to hear the mixer running or the dishwasher . come on people get kitchens back the way the use to be .
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Open concept yes or no ? In my opinion it is simply a matter of individual preference. When we purchased our cottage in South Florida we thought at first to keep one wall to separate the kitchen from the living/dining area. But then decided against it as the rooms in these 60s houses are not that large. Maybe it does work better for smaller homes to make the space look larger. But again, different folks, different strokes. I definitely would not like to change our open living/dining/kitchen area. It fits our casual coastal lifestyle and it is great for entertaining.

Here it is
https://picasaweb.google.com/1...v1sRgCNOhpp22hoWuaw#

Have a wonderful weekend.
Sunny greetings from SoFL !
 
Posts: 207 | Location: SE Florida | Registered: Apr 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by klinkdog:
also another point , my hubby likes to lay on the couch and snooze and he dont want to hear the mixer running or the dishwasher . come on people get kitchens back the way the use to be .


Good point! But most of the new dishwashers today are so quiet you really have to listen close to know they are on. My DH loves to take naps on the couch in the afternoon on the weekends, of course I usually join him. But if there IS a mixer running - he' knows he's getting something yummy later! Yummy

BTW had to add....it would take a jackhammer in the kitchen to wake DH up! LOL!


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
 
Posts: 7276 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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well I have to say the old kitchens will be back. just wait . Smile
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The open concept isn't really as popular as this thread would make it appear to be.
Open kitchens tend to lack adequate storage, so that they stay cluttered constantly, or their owners have to keep things in rooms other than the kitchens. This is not necessarily the case with kitchens with pass throughs and cased openings, but more the case with the "against the wall" style open kitchen.


"The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but how well he fixes them."
 
Posts: 152 | Registered: Feb 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is a house in our community that was featured in Better Homes and Gardens in 1970 which boasted an open floor plan kitchen, so I don't think "trendy" or "new" when considering them as an option. They are well suited to families where the activities tend to be focused on the kitchen, so parents can keep an eye on everyone( esp. these days when kids seem to be made of spun sugar). I don't care for them because I like to set a formal table for parties and I don't want to look at the unwashed pots while I'm eating.
 
Posts: 1736 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like semi-open. I think there really is a noise & mess issue when it's too open. It drives us crazy when someone uses the ice dispenser or is banging around pots & pans and we can't hear the TV.
 
Posts: 101 | Registered: May 18, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Question for open kitchen people--I cook and bake all the time--how do open kitchens contain all the cooking smells and splatters. I once saw a show which actually showed how cooking splatters travel all over even with a powerful hood. So how do you contain them? Even though I live in a traditional home I can see how attractive open spaces can be in a more modern setting. I've always wondered about cooking.
 
Posts: 3048 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by 16paws:
Question for open kitchen people--I cook and bake all the time--how do open kitchens contain all the cooking smells and splatters. I once saw a show which actually showed how cooking splatters travel all over even with a powerful hood. So how do you contain them? Even though I live in a traditional home I can see how attractive open spaces can be in a more modern setting. I've always wondered about cooking.

My kitchen dining room and living are on one floor, smells travel where they want. I don't have a hood, I just open windows if it gets too hot or smelly. Splatter just stays in the kitchen, it doesn't travel farther than the kitchen as it would if the kitchen was closed.
 
Posts: 2438 | Location: Southern CA (Southbay) | Registered: Nov 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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LOL, I only cook things that smell good, and being in the mountains we just tend to eat better (more salads, fresh fruits) at 8,000 feet no one wants to be loaded down with greasy food so no grease if one does not fry things. Tall vaulted ceiling, large windows and doors, control temperature as well.
Not for everyone.... nor every family. But I really like ours.
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by 16paws:
Question for open kitchen people--I cook and bake all the time--how do open kitchens contain all the cooking smells and splatters. I once saw a show which actually showed how cooking splatters travel all over even with a powerful hood. So how do you contain them? Even though I live in a traditional home I can see how attractive open spaces can be in a more modern setting. I've always wondered about cooking.


Hmm. I have always thought I was a messy cook, but have honestly never had problems with splatters all over everything. I tend to clean up as I go and then wipe everything down afterwards, using a bleach solution on the countertops. As for the smell - well, that does get to be a problem but you'd have that in any home, I'd suppose if you're sensitive to it. I cannot sleep with the smell of food in the house so all cooking is done and over with several hours before bedtime. I think I'd have that problem in a compartmentalized home too.
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Formal dining rooms are wonderful brings back the warmth and feeling of family like when I grew up.please builders bring it all back.
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Builders are not apt to bring back the separate dining room, (in moderate sized homes) unless buyers insist, and lots of people (especially young families) are just not as eager to give up the square footage, just for this room?

My own personal view, would be to use an existing formal dining room as a library, with the dining table a large work space for research, homework, sewing, whatever...and a dining space for those half dozen occasions or less during the year where large family meals could occur.
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by conrad:
Builders are not apt to bring back the separate dining room, (in moderate sized homes) unless buyers insist, and lots of people (especially young families) are just not as eager to give up the square footage, just for this room?

My own personal view, would be to use an existing formal dining room as a library, with the dining table a large work space for research, homework, sewing, whatever...and a dining space for those half dozen occasions or less during the year where large family meals could occur.


Yes, I'd like that too Conrad - I rarely use my dining room table for the purpose it was intended.
Someone said the open kitchens don't have much storage? Hogwash! I'm sure some don't but I've been in many many homes w/ the open floor plan and a large island between the kitchen and family room where the storage was amazing!
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Doodles, We actually don't have as many cabinets in our open kitchen...however.. it has shown me I just don't need that much stuff close at hand. We are planning a lower level pantry, so groceries come in from the garage, and much of the staples will be actually stored downstairs immediately. Open boxes, immediate use stuff comes upstairs. Not a big deal for me to go down to get a new bag of pasta, canned goods, or freezer items.

Many things that I was storing in the other home, I very seldom used or even remembered that I had. So now I am planning kitchen storage for just the most used items. I love pull out shelves too. I find it sort of fun to figure out storage ideas.
Gladly I gave up lots of cabinets for the gorgeous mountain panoramic views.Smile
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by conrad:
Doodles, We actually don't have as many cabinets in our open kitchen...however.. it has shown me I just don't need that much stuff close at hand. We are planning a lower level pantry, so groceries come in from the garage, and much of the staples will be actually stored downstairs immediately. Open boxes, immediate use stuff comes upstairs. Not a big deal for me to go down to get a new bag of pasta, canned goods, or freezer items.

Many things that I was storing in the other home, I very seldom used or even remembered that I had. So now I am planning kitchen storage for just the most used items. I love pull out shelves too. I find it sort of fun to figure out storage ideas.
Gladly I gave up lots of cabinets for the gorgeous mountain panoramic views.Smile


Of course, I don't know what your kitchen will be configured like or what size it is. I just know that so many of the open kitchen plans I've seen here have had so much more storage than I have had in "closed in" kitchens. I have one client with whom I've worked on several homes all with an open concept and all of them have had the most amazing storage in the kitchen. Granted, they were large kitchens and each of them had a large walk in pantry, but there were plenty of shelves, drawers and cupboards besides.
I envy you the panoramic views - sounds wonderful!
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My next door neighbor's house had the same basic floor plan as mine. The minute he moved in, he took down the wall between the living room and kitchen, thus losing his eat-in kitchen, which led to converting the bedroom adjoining the kitchen to a dining space (took down the wall leading to the living room as well). So then he was stuck with a two-bedroom house. Now he's planning to add a second story so he can have a third bedroom and another bathroom. What he has actually succeeded in doing (combined with the over the top backyard he has created) is pricing himself totally out of the market for this area. He doesn't care because he won't be moving, but his son will never be able to get the money back when the time comes to sell. The rest of us (including his brother across the street) just shake our heads. Reading this thread makes me think that if he had never taken that first wall down, he wouldn't have lost his head like this. We do, however, blame HGTV every time any of us in the neighborhood starts a project. Smile
 
Posts: 3241 | Location: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some people like to spend their free time playing golf, others extensive travel, some maybe sailing/boating....and then there are those who like to redo their floorplans with extensive remodeling. In the end, it doesn't really matter so much, as long as they enjoy the process and get personal satisfaction from it. Wink
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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conrad, that's exactly what he says. Some men fish or hunt, he renovates.
 
Posts: 3241 | Location: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For each home improvement project I have tackled I have rewarded myself with a new tool (so well worth the investment). For "a girl" I have quite a shop now! Big Grin
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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no curtains uh , I like the dark to sleep . How in the world can a person sleep with out curtians or drapes . Open concept is a fad and I am already seeing shows on hgtv for people asking for closed kitchens. Who wants to be cooking and talking to friends at the same time . You might forget a ingredient or leave something to burn. Bad idea .
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by klinkdog:
no curtains uh , I like the dark to sleep . How in the world can a person sleep with out curtians or drapes . Open concept is a fad and I am already seeing shows on hgtv for people asking for closed kitchens. Who wants to be cooking and talking to friends at the same time . You might forget a ingredient or leave something to burn. Bad idea .


If it's a "fad" it's one that's been around for quite awhile and shows no signs (at least here in Texas) of going away any time soon. I was just looking at new homes w/ a client last week and they ALL had the big open concept, tons of kitchen storage and easy entertainment flow throughout the public areas. These were pretty high end homes, too. I haven't seen one plan with a closed off kitchen in a very long time.

As for cooking and talking at the same time, we do this all the time. Most women have at some time in their life balanced cooking with looking after a couple of toddlers, stepping around assorted pets and answering the phone - LOL - I think we were programmed with a multi-task gene that was added to the rib. Big Grin
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also had to chuckle about open concept being a fad. Absolutely it is not for everyone or every family/home situation, (but then again what is???)

BTW, nothing new: It has been around since cave men, indian teepees/lodges, settlers cabins, yurts, so not a new thing at all.

We have it now, and I LOVE it. Did not know how I thought about it before but it "lives" very well for me.
 
Posts: 9429 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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been watching House hunters and been noticing some are looking for separate dining room.
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I really like this open concept. It took advantage of stunning surroundings when designed house plans. These open plan designs make the house feel larger and more open and it also give you more options as far as room usage is concerned.

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Posts: 1 | Registered: Jan 30, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To each his own.... I love a big dining rooms for family holidays ... have a wonderful Holiday everyone....
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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bump
 
Posts: 4454 | Location: Texas | Registered: Mar 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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anyway I thought when you entertained people for dinner you cook it first . right??? then people come over .... sigh and if I have to buy a house with open concept I am sure a builder would build a wall if I wanted ****... have a great day all
 
Posts: 349 | Registered: Oct 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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