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aging in place Sign In/Join 
posted
I am curious whether any of the HGTV shows have done or will do episodes/themes on aging in place. My parents (late 60s) and I (early 40s) share a house and, while none of us is has mobility impairments at this time, we see the need to expand our home in order to make our bathroom(s) accessible, expand our hallway/bedrooms to enable 36" doorways, etc. The project seems overwhelming to us, and though there are some web-based resources out there, it also seems as though it's a relatively specialized area of expertise and one that could be open for unscrupulous contractors looking to make a buck off desperate people. Any advice?
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Sep 16, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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This Old House has done some segments on accessible living. I doubt HGTV would do much with the subject because it isn't an interest to their "target audience" the Millennials.

This is not much different than any renovation project there are good contractors and bad contractors out there. I would probably start with an architect that specializes in this area and work with him. They will likely have some trusted contractors that they have worked with in the past. Alternatively, reach out to family, friends, co-workers who have had renovation work done to get recommended contractors. And there is always Angie's list.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6958 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would guess that a very small percentage of elderly actually have to use a wheelchair. That is based on observation of elderly friends,relatives, not based on a study. Walkers fit through existing doors.

Do your own research and than adapt that to what you need. Most people need few adjustments. One level home. Showers so you don't have to step over a tub edge. Otherwise it is decorating tips.

As far as contractors: that is just do your due diligence like anyone would for any work that is being done.
 
Posts: 7099 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I believe your point is valid.

The fact that most all of us are tending to live longer is currently something to consider in all aspects of our lives, including our homes and dwellings and how they function.

Many of our parents are even now living well into their late 80's and 90's and beyond and eventually physical and/or memory issues will be a concern in all our lives.

But will it sell new flooring, counter tops, light fixtures, etc? These are what HGTV show's sponsors are interested in. They pay for the advertising, which pay for the shows.
 
Posts: 9631 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Kim, realize that HGTV personnel don't read these forums; you need to contact them by posting to one of the show sites.

As to mobility issues, wife and I are 83 and we get around ok on foot. When we go to the local Senior Center for lunch, there are maybe 2-3 wheelchair folks there out of over 50 and they range in age up over 90.

Otherwise the comments above apply. When I was contracting in SoCA I did some work for disabled folks and became somewhat of an expert on the subject. But you need someone there to assist you.
 
Posts: 12191 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Bob
You were just a spring chicken when you started posting here. I don't recall the exact date, the Sep 18, 2002 date is when they blew up the boards and started over if I recall correctly. We've been doing this for over 11 years now?


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6958 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of sjf
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found these to look at...hard core remodels...

https://www.google.com/search?...w=1600&bih=744&dpr=1

however, a few mods can be done right now with little difficulty...first thing? invest in a "tall toilet"...carried at both box stores...actually once you use one you hate normal height..also why the 3 ft wide doors? my mother's walker (nice one from Costco) fit thru a 28" doorway, and now days scooters are much smaller and are house width...

the other thing (unless you're planning on being wheelchair bound) is a walk in shower with added hand rails. add a hand held shower and portable chair, showers are ok...

dh and ds installed a pre-fab metal ramp for fil's scooter...search them. it was quite reasonable compared to a built in place wood ramp...(and resale possible)

last, the latest mother-in-suite is prefab....it can be added to the exterior or in many cases into an existing garage...(although giving up a garage in mi winters is awful, lol)
 
Posts: 8551 | Location: se mi | Registered: Sep 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I should have said more in my previous post!

In SoCA I did a lot of work for a mid-aged guy who was paralyzed from the waist down in a car accident. His place had standard doorways at 30" but he was a bit careless in going through them in his wheelchair. At his request I put clear plastic corner pieces over the exposed parts of the door jambs. This protected them from damage so the place would be more presentable when he eventually moved. You can get these plastic corner protectors at a wall paper store.

A drug store stock shower seat is what he used in the shower. Same for two ladies that needed caregiver help in the shower. I was about to build a wood shower ramp for a gentleman in a wheelchair, but he died before I could get it done.

Yes, a hand-held shower head with a flex hose works nice; in fact that is what we use. I wanted that after having knees replaced. Not easy to put a grab bar in our shower but I use the edge of the swing shower door to steady myself as necessary. Many times a heavy duty grab bar is not needed so much as something to steady ones self. That would be the case for someone with Parkinson's.

Glass walled showers can be a hazard, mainly because a builder will use a cheap one with thin glass. The same type of shower with thicker glass is a lot safer.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Bob Fleming,
 
Posts: 12191 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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