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  Is it appropriate to have bathroom directly off of dining/family room
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Is it appropriate to have bathroom directly off of dining/family room Sign In/Join 
posted
I'm trying to remodel my rental property. The only bathroom on the ground floor is hidden behind the laundry room, and is extremely small. One would have to enter laundry room first from the kitchen. I want to expand and isolate the bathroom from the laundry room by opening a door from the dining/family room. Is this appropriate? The only other option is to only expand the bathroom, but still make people walk thru the laundry room to get to the bathroom. The only problem here is that i also want to put the water heater in the laundry room; i would have to stack the washer/dryer to save space. Here is my plan. I appreciate any feedbacks or ideas. thanks in advance.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: extremeblue99,

New Bathroom
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: Jul 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Your link doesn't work.

Our powder room is in the hallway between our kitchen and our dining room, across the hallway from the basement stairs and the pantry. In our house it was the only space available on the first floor for a powder room. In building there are always compromises unless you have unlimited budget to make the space as large as possible.

One of my upcoming projects is to stack the washer and dryer to give us more room in our laundry room. If I were building my house again, I would have added the back stairs to the bonus room which would have given me a larger laundry room, alas, the house was already under construction when we bought it and doing that wasn't an option once the foundation was poured.

There are at least a dozen of my floor plan built in my subdivision and the builder has probably built hundreds if not a thousand or more of them over the years, yet if I built the same house again I'd change a dozen things and after living in that house I'd probably change another dozen things if I did it again. The location of our powder room isn't high on my list of things to change. I probably would put in a pocket door instead of an outswinging door to eliminate the clash of doors in this short hallway. There are three doors that open into the hallway and they all can bang into each other.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6943 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I personally don't see it as a big problem. Convenience and space probably trumps possible esthetics, especially with a rental property.
 
Posts: 9613 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some building codes require that there be two doors between a bathroom and any room where food is handled (kichen).
 
Posts: 12183 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hey, I can post again! For a long time my anti-virus program wouldn't let me.
 
Posts: 12183 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Welcome back Bob. With respect to your code reference, that would make about 90% of the homes in my neighborhood non-compliant. I suspect that could be a requirement in restaurants though I've been in my share of them that have one door to the bathroom with an open counter where food is served. I'd think a better use of code would be to require all bathroom doors swing out with automatic door closers instead of door knobs so you don't have to touch a handle to open the door since so many people seem incapable of washing their hands after going to the restroom...


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6943 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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To answer the original question -
A bathroom door in the dining area is off-putting to many people. Imagine a dinner party of eight seated there when you need to use the facility. I'd rather such activity be as private as possible. It's a different thing to discreetly rise from the table and disappear down a hallway than to rise and open the bath door on the next wall in full view of the other diners. Then there are the associated sounds and perhaps ~ahem~ emanations. ick ICK

If the rental will be a high-end one, the door should definitely be located out of view. If it attracts moderate or lower income families, you can probably get by with it with no one complaining. JMO
 
Posts: 4513 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If I had the choice of a rental with bathroom off the dining room or through the laundry room, I definitely would choose the privacy of one through the laundry room. I think many women would feel this way.
 
Posts: 112 | Registered: Apr 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Now that I can see the picture, this wouldn't be my first choice. I'd probably reconfigure the laundry room by stacking the washer and dryer and moving the water heater. If you have gas, this might be a case where I'd opt for the smaller footprint of a tankless water heater. Though if you have hard water I'd probably avoid the tankless because it would require an annual descaling or you'd kill it in a couple of years.

What does the rest of the first floor plan look like? How deep is the entry?


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6943 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Wheatey
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I wouldn't recommend it based on experience. When we opened up a hallway to make an open kitchen/dining room, it left the hallway bathroom open to the area between the kitchen and dining room. It was awkward when we had company in the dining room so most of my family would run upstairs to use the facilities in a more private location. Growing up, we had a shower in the kitchen - don't even get me started on that one. LOL.
 
Posts: 71 | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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