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bedroom window

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Feb 26, 2013, 08:20 PM
sunshine52
bedroom window
how big does a bedroom window have to be to qualify the room as a bedroom? closet also?
Feb 26, 2013, 09:04 PM
redoverfarm
If you are referring to a egress window the following site list the demensions and requirements. http://www.homesafetysolutions...age/page/4282797.htm

This message has been edited. Last edited by: redoverfarm,
Feb 27, 2013, 09:21 AM
conrad
Seems that I always heard a closet space (accessible from the bedroom) is also required. If no closet, then it is often classified as a den or office space.

example: We have a basement bedroom with large closet, but just 2 small upper windows...so a homeowner could use it as one needed, but it will be classified as an office space (rather than a 4th bedroom) when we go to sell.
Feb 27, 2013, 10:00 AM
Sparky
If the landscape will accommodate it one of these will really open up your basement bedroom.

http://www.bilco.com/foundatio...-Egress-Window-Wells


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Feb 27, 2013, 11:22 AM
conrad
When we finished the basement area 18 years ago, it was suggested Sparky, but just not in the budget at the time. Plus we have poured basement concrete walls and only 10 feet to the property line and neighbors landscaping on the South side, so getting equipment back there would have been tight.

Maybe the next owner will do so? Wink
Feb 27, 2013, 02:03 PM
Sparky
Poured concrete can be cut, hand excavating would be a lot of work, but hey they built the pyramids without power equipment and most of the canals in the world were hand dug.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Feb 27, 2013, 02:06 PM
conrad
Very true.
But honestly...after 29 years I am just DONE with this house! Wink
Feb 28, 2013, 07:00 AM
sunshine52
Does a door count as a way out? French doors or a sliding glass door? I know you have to have a way to exit the room in the event of a fire. There is a door however, 2 windows would brighten the room. It would involve cutting through a brick wall.

Any ideas on the size of a closet? 3 x 3?
Feb 28, 2013, 08:22 AM
conrad
I think a door to the outside would count. The reason for the egress window is it is large enough for a fireman or rescue personnel to get through with gear, and get an unresponsive victim to safety in case of a fire, bldg collapse or other issue has blocked another route. The door would also provide this.
If you call your town, city or county building dept, they should be able to tell you the minimum closet size.
Feb 28, 2013, 09:48 AM
Sparky
quote:
Originally posted by sunshine52:
Does a door count as a way out? French doors or a sliding glass door? I know you have to have a way to exit the room in the event of a fire. There is a door however, 2 windows would brighten the room. It would involve cutting through a brick wall.

Any ideas on the size of a closet? 3 x 3?


An exterior door is counted as an egress point. 3x3 is pretty small for a bedroom closet. It is the typical hall closet here in NC. Some neighbors moved here from MN and were surprised at how small our coat closets are in NC. Well, duh, we don't have 5 parkas per person.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Feb 28, 2013, 04:29 PM
Bob Fleming
A closet 27" deep is (barely) acceptable; I saw many of these when I was contracting in SoCA. 3' wide is enough for a guest bedroom, but I wouldn't consider it acceptable, and my wife would flat out reject it.
Apr 30, 2013, 07:44 AM
JolieBayer
quote:
Originally posted by sunshine52:
how big does a bedroom window have to be to qualify the room as a bedroom? closet also?

As far as I know bedroom closets should be between 4-6 feet wide, and 24" in depth. It can vary depending upon your need and size of the room.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: JolieBayer,
May 01, 2013, 02:13 AM
Chuck Steak
Other than some real estate listing rules I've never seen a requirement for a bedroom to have a closet to get a certificate of occupancy. Remember, closets only began to be used about 100 years ago.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Chuck Steak,
May 01, 2013, 01:25 PM
Sparky
Chuck,
I believe you're correct. I think zoning has been used to control the number of unrelated people living in a house. This is typically used in college towns to limit the ability of college kids from cramming 10 people into a 3 bedroom house.

How you use the rooms is for the most part your business. When you go to list a house generally speaking bedrooms have closets. I lived in the UK for two years from early 79 to early 81. I shared a 3 bedroom apartment, we had exactly one closet in the entire apartment. We used wardrobes as closets, very common over there.

If you finish a space in your basement and it doesn't have an egress window or a closet there is nothing that would stop you from using it as a bedroom or a guestroom, other than a personal concern for safety. You wouldn't be able to list it as a bedroom though without an egress door or window.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

May 02, 2013, 08:30 PM
Jim978
quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Steak:
Other than some real estate listing rules I've never seen a requirement for a bedroom to have a closet to get a certificate of occupancy. Remember, closets only began to be used about 100 years ago.


I've never even seen it as a real estate listing requirement.

I first ran into it when dealing with septic systems. Septic systems are sized based on how many "bedrooms" it can handle (regardless of how many bathrooms you have!). I guess the theory is that only X number of people can occupy Y number of bedrooms. Anyway, by not putting a closet in a room it can be argued that it isn't a bedroom and you can end up with a house with a "3-bedroom septic system" on a small lot with a couple of "bonus rooms" so that the house functions as a 4 or 5 bedroom home. That same lot might not be big enough to legally fit a 4 or 5 bedroom septic system.
May 03, 2013, 01:11 PM
zone9alady
quote:
Originally posted by Jim978:

I first ran into it when dealing with septic systems. Septic systems are sized based on how many "bedrooms" it can handle (regardless of how many bathrooms you have!). I guess the theory is that only X number of people can occupy Y number of bedrooms. Anyway, by not putting a closet in a room it can be argued that it isn't a bedroom and you can end up with a house with a "3-bedroom septic system" on a small lot with a couple of "bonus rooms" so that the house functions as a 4 or 5 bedroom home. That same lot might not be big enough to legally fit a 4 or 5 bedroom septic system.


Well it seems that is not the case in our county. We added 1400sq.ft. of living space about 5 years ago. The county made us double the amount of drain field for the added room. No bedrooms or baths were added.


Whether You Think You Can Or You Think You Can't..... You're Right - Henry Ford
May 03, 2013, 01:36 PM
conrad
In CO, my understanding size of septic has been based on square footage of the home and any additional buildings that have plumbing hooked to it. Additions would add sq footage as Zone9alady states.

County just has no idea what you (or especially future owners) intend to use that additional space for.

Guess the whole idea is to keep us safe and healthy and avoid contamination of our homes and neighbors.

PS, with all the issues with septic and wells that we researched, we were really thrilled to find a acreage development home that was on city water and sewer. Wink
May 04, 2013, 07:05 AM
metwo
In MN and also AR the septic is sized by the number of bedrooms. Interesting that it is different in different parts of the county.

Interesting debate about well water versus city water. Well water taste better ( ours does anyway) and there is no monthly bill. City water continues to be useable even when the power goes out. It is so nice to be able to flush a toilet.
May 04, 2013, 11:57 AM
conrad
By location, well water can often be great, good, ok or barely drinkable with lots of filters. Wink
May 08, 2013, 03:44 AM
Chuck Steak
Well water is only free if it requires no treatment, no pump repairs, replacement or maintenance, the well itself stays good forever and you get your electricity for free.
May 08, 2013, 09:09 AM
Sparky
quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Steak:
Well water is only free if it requires no treatment, no pump repairs, replacement or maintenance, the well itself stays good forever and you get your electricity for free.


It is also my experience that these things will fail at the most inconvenient time, such as Christmas eve when you're expecting a houseful of people the next day. Well water can be good tasting or it can be awful. I like the reliability of my city water and sewer, the capital expense of a new well or new leaching field can be a major budget buster versus a monthly water bill.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

May 08, 2013, 09:29 AM
metwo
Isn't it some kind of rule that things in the house break at the most inconvenient time? The oven poops out the day before thanksgiving, our garage opener broke the day we listed our house for sale. Heard about someone who had a water leak the night before a home inspection.

Sometimes I swear our home has an evil sense of humor.Smile