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Electrical for Shed Sign In/Join 
Picture of headielamar
posted
I am having a shed built in my back yard (10' x 16') which I intend to have wired for electricity before it is insulated and sheet rocked. I know nothing about electricity requirements except that this does need to be done by a licensed electrician and permits do need to be pulled. I have gotten one estimate for the work and am getting three more next week. Here is my question - the one quote I have gotten says I need three circuits and the work will take two guys two days to complete. I don't know what 'three circuits' means. Does that make sense? The items I will need electricity for are the overhead lights, the sewing machine, iron, tv, small frig, computer and a heater during the cold months. Also, the two guys/two days seems like a lot to me. What do you think? I would just like to know a little more than nothing before the next guy comes to give me a bid. Thanks!
 
Posts: 2923 | Location: Cuddled up in my pretty purple house! | Registered: Jul 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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The heater would likely need a dedicated circuit, possibly the same for the fridge depending on how large it is. Three circuits doesn't seem out of line given your load. Three circuits would mean three breakers. As to crew size, getting the wires to the she'd is going to take some labor, how far is the shed from the house? Is there a trench and or conduit from the house to the shed for the wires?


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 7001 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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It is good you are getting multiple estimates. So finding a fair deal should be easier.

From what "little" I know about power consumption, the three circuits/breakers sound pretty normal too. Heat producing appliances like the iron and heater will probably be drawing the most power of what you mention. But perhaps a coffee maker or microwave might be possibilities in your future? Better to plan for more than enough circuits and end up not needing them.
Electricians often work with a helper, so two guys also sound normal to me. As to the time? Like Sparky mentioned...are they going to bury the lines in conduit/trench? More labor then.

The other estimates will help you determine if this one sounds right.
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of headielamar
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The wires will be buried in a trench but digging the trench is not included in the labor I was quoted. I either have to do that myself or pay someone else to do it. Thank goodness I have a strong 26 year old son who is always short of cash. According to the quote the house is 100 feet from the shed. I will measure it tomorrow. Thanks for the help, I appreciate it.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: headielamar,
 
Posts: 2923 | Location: Cuddled up in my pretty purple house! | Registered: Jul 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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I would consider running a larger circuit and install a sub panel given the distance and your use for this shed, which really sounds like a office/hobby room instead of a place to store lawn and garden equipment.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 7001 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
posted Hide Post
As to the trench, rent a ditch witch. Get the utilities marked before trenching. Electrical wires need to down 18-24 inches, at 100 feet that is a lot of hand digging, even for a 26 year old.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 7001 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
posted Hide Post
Depth of electrical conduit (pipe) burial will vary depending on local soil conditions and where you are located. The electricians should have this information with their permits?
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of headielamar
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Yes the shed will be my sewing studio, not a storage shed. I am preparing for my elderly parents to move in so giving up my current sewing space to be their office/library. I measured it today and it will be 50 feet from the house, not 100 feet as the quote said. Thanks for mentioning having the utilities marked. I will definitely do that. I don't know what the width or depth requirement of the trench is. Haven"t gotten that far yet. I will also look into renting the ditch witch. Great ideas you two have.
 
Posts: 2923 | Location: Cuddled up in my pretty purple house! | Registered: Jul 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Good of you to prepare a space for your parents, and smart of you to create a space for yourself.Wink
Just a suggestion for design?
Don't know if you have planned for it, but some sort of roof extension over your entry door (or better yet, an actual porch) will make entering and exiting the space so much nicer in rainy seasons. A screen door can then be better utilized in any nice weather too.
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of headielamar
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Yes, a porch is included. I live in rainy Portland, OR so we get rain at least 9 months out of the year.
 
Posts: 2923 | Location: Cuddled up in my pretty purple house! | Registered: Jul 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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That is good!
Have you also considered a skylight window? I would think the more natural light coming in...the better. Wink

We put a couple in our 3 season porch and it really helps brighten the space.
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of headielamar
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My sister suggested a skylight as well. It will have one window, but no skylight. My reasoning is I want to be able to leave fabric out and the more windows/sky lights you have the more you have to worry about the sun fading the fabric. I want a space where I can just leave things mid project if I want/need to. Using the shed will allow me to do that because guests who aren't used to the mess sewing can provide will not be out there.
 
Posts: 2923 | Location: Cuddled up in my pretty purple house! | Registered: Jul 09, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do install a power subpanel as mentioned above. Consider the situation where you are in the "shed" and the lights go out. Then without a subpanel, you have to go back to the house in the dark to reset a breaker. With a properly installed and sized subpanel you could get the lights back on without having to go outside.
 
Posts: 12208 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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