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posted
Can I cut-in around all the trim and windows in the entire room before rolling? Does it matter if the paint has been dry before rolling over it? Or, should I just cut-in in small areas and then roll that section before moving on? Any recommendations or tips are appreciated.
 
Posts: 263 | Location: Council Bluffs, IA USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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If painting alone, I will work in sections. Perhaps cutting in an entire wall, or half of it. Mostly because I am doing the ceiling and the trim around upper windows, only wanting to move the ladder once for each area, so then get up and roll the area the wall that can be reached by the ladder.

Using a great quality paint, I have not had any issue if the cut in area is dry before rolling the wall. Wet into wet is the best option, but when you roll, make sure to go close to the trim, so any texture difference between brush and roller is not noticeable. The better quality paints tend to do a good job of self leveling, so this is not such an issue either.
 
Posts: 9664 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will be doing this alone. I am using Sherwin Williams paint so it's quality paint. My concern is seeing brush strokes along the trim, windows, etc. Or worse yet, where I stopped with the brush.
 
Posts: 263 | Location: Council Bluffs, IA USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have not had what you describe, happen before. I should add that if one covers the cutting in areas well with enough paint, one coat will do. (Prime any actual patched/repaired areas or they may show later)

I have also used (and had good luck) using a paint pad (with little rollers on one side) to do cutting in near wood work/trim, instead of taping. (nothing wrong with taping), but I also use a great quality 2 inch brush with a nice tapered edge in other areas.

Wrapping these in some aluminum foil while busy rolling, keeps them from drying out too. Plastic bag over roller and pan, while cutting in.

I always do two coats for wall coverage, with only one coat cutting in areas, thus the second coat goes much faster.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: conrad,
 
Posts: 9664 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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There are mini rollers on the market which may be closer in texture to your larger roller to ensure the cut in areas will blend well with the larger wall areas. Some of these mini rollers have rounded edges, but for cutting in, get as close as you can and finish off with an angled brush near the trim.
 
Posts: 18737 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yes you must cut-in around all the trim and windows in all rooms of your home before rolling. It would be better if you cut some small areas and then roll that section before moving.
 
Posts: 19 | Location: USA, California, San Jose | Registered: Aug 26, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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