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Picture of Spanish Revival
posted
This is most definitely off topic, however I think it's helpful information. If you've had Chicken Pox you are a candidate to have shingles which is very painful. There is a vaccine available to be sure you won't get shingles. In my opinion, and having been an RN and my husband a physician, we have, combined, seen many patients with shingles... it isn't anything you want to endure, it's extremely uncomfortable to say the least. Give yourself and those you love the gift of a vaccination, the symptoms can last weeks and are debilitating.
 
Posts: 908 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I've looked into this. So glad I have insurance as the shot is about $700 or so. Before my next doctor's office visit, I'm gong to call to make certain he has the vaccine on hand.

My neighbor had shingles in 2010...across her back, over her shoulder, neck, check, and even in her eye. They had to keep the drapes closed and most of the lights off in the house. She was absolutely miserable.
 
Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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I asked my doctor about getting one at my last physical, he informed me you can't get it until you're 60+, not sure of the exact age but I couldn't get it at 51.

I was at a local Walgreens the other day and I saw they were offering it in the store. From what I understand it is a fairly tricky vaccine to store properly. I was surprised to see it offered in a retail pharmacy.


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My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6858 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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We had a topic thread about this in May on the Gardening Board. You may want to view that thread. -

http://boards.hgtv.com/eve/for...4011632/m/1703998857

ETA - for anyone who doesn't like to click on links the topic thread is on page 18 of the General Gardening Board on HGTV's message board with this title -

OT(but important to 60+ age)

The topic was started by board member, thebrownthumb, last date a reply was posted - May 5, 1:49 PM

This message has been edited. Last edited by: still tryin,
 
Posts: 2641 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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quote:
Originally posted by Sparky:
I asked my doctor about getting one at my last physical, he informed me you can't get it until you're 60+, not sure of the exact age but I couldn't get it at 51.

I was at a local Walgreens the other day and I saw they were offering it in the store. From what I understand it is a fairly tricky vaccine to store properly. I was surprised to see it offered in a retail pharmacy.


Yes you can Sparky you just need a prescription.

This is from the CDC's website:

At this time, CDC does not have a recommendation for routine use of shingles vaccine in persons 50 through 59 years old. However, the vaccine is approved by FDA for people 50 and older. It is available by prescription from a health care provider. Talk with your health care provider if you have questions about shingles vaccine.
 
Posts: 2641 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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This is what I posted on that thread. -

Also, if you get the vaccination go to a pharmacy to get the shot. The vaccine has to be kept frozen and looses effectiveness after a half-hour after its thawed . Most doctors don't store the vaccine in their offices. You still need to get a prescription from a doctor for the vaccine.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vp...s/vacc-need-know.htm

Vaccines and Preventable Diseases:
Shingles Vaccination: What You Need to Know
Information for the General Public

On this page:

Disease Protection

Who Should Get the Vaccine

Who Should NOT Get the Vaccine

Possible Reactions to Vaccination

Reimbursement for Vaccination

Related Links


The vaccine for shingles (Zostavax®) is recommended for use in people 60 years old and older to prevent shingles. The older a person is, the more severe the effects of shingles typically are, so all adults 60 years old or older should get the shingles vaccine.

The shingles vaccine is specifically designed to protect people against shingles and will not protect people against other forms of herpes, such as genital herpes. The shingles vaccine is not recommended to treat active shingles or post-herpetic neuralgia (pain after the rash is gone) once it develops.
Disease Protection

In a clinical trial involving thousands of adults 60 years old or older, Zostavax reduced the risk of shingles by about half (51%) and the risk of post-herpetic neuralgia by 67%. While the vaccine was most effective in people 60-69 years old it also provided some protection for older groups.

Research suggests that the shingles vaccine is effective for at least six years, but may last much longer. Ongoing studies are being conducted to determine exactly how long the vaccine protects against shingles.
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Who Should Get the Vaccine

CDC recommends Zostavax for use in people 60 years old and older to prevent shingles. This is a one-time vaccination. There is no maximum age for getting the shingles vaccine.

Anyone 60 years of age or older should get the shingles vaccine, regardless of whether they recall having had chickenpox or not. Studies show that more than 99% of Americans ages 40 and older have had chickenpox, even if they don’t remember getting the disease.

At this time, CDC does not have a recommendation for routine use of shingles vaccine in persons 50 through 59 years old. However, the vaccine is approved by FDA for people 50 and older. It is available by prescription from a health care provider. Talk with your health care provider if you have questions about shingles vaccine.

Even if you have had shingles, you can still receive the shingles vaccine to help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific time that you must wait after having shingles before receiving the shingles vaccine. The decision on when to get vaccinated should be made with your health care provider. Generally, a person should make sure that the shingles rash has disappeared before getting vaccinated.
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Who Should NOT Get the Vaccine

Some people should NOT get shingles vaccine.

A person who has ever had a life-threatening or severe allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
A person who has a weakened immune system because of
HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids,
cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy,
a history of cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma.
Women who are or might be pregnant

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Possible Reactions to Vaccination

No serious problems have been identified with shingles vaccine.

The vaccine has been tested in about 20,000 people aged 60 years old and older. The most common side effects in people who got the vaccine were redness, soreness, swelling or itching at the shot site, and headache. CDC, working with the FDA, will continue to monitor the safety of the vaccine after it is in general use.

It is safe to be around infants and young children, pregnant women, or people with weakened immune systems after you get the shingles vaccine. There is no documentation of a person getting chickenpox from someone who has received the shingles vaccine (which contains varicella zoster virus).

Some people who get the shingles vaccine will develop a chickenpox-like rash near the place where they were vaccinated. As a precaution, this rash should be covered until it disappears.

The shingles vaccine does not contain thimerosal (a preservative containing mercury).
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Reimbursement for Vaccination

All Medicare Part D plans cover the shingles vaccine. The amount of cost-sharing (money you have to pay) for vaccination varies.

Medicare Part B does not cover the shingles vaccine. If you have private insurance or Medicaid, your plan may or may not cover the vaccine; contact your insurer to find out.
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Related Links

Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Information Sheet
Shingles (Herpes zoster) Vaccine Side-Effects

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ETA info for your doctor about shipping, storing and manufacturer contact information -

Zoster (Shingles) Vaccine

Shipping Requirements
Vaccine: Should be shipped in insulated container. Must be shipped with dry ice only, at 5°F (-15°C) or colder. Should be delivered within 2 days.
Diluent: May be shipped with vaccine, but do not place in container with dry ice.
Condition upon Arrival
Should be frozen. Vaccine should remain at 5°F (-15°C) or colder until arrival at the healthcare facility. Dry ice should still be present in the shipping container when vaccine is delivered.
If you have questions about the condition of the material at the time of delivery, you should 1) immediately place material in recommended storage; and 2) then follow your state health department immunization program policy and contact either the Manufacturer’s Quality Control office or the immunization program for guidance.
Storage Requirements
Vaccine: Freeze immediately upon arrival. Maintain vaccine in a continuously frozen state at 5°F (-15°C) or colder. No freeze/thaw cycles are allowed with this vaccine. Vaccine should only be stored in freezers or refrigerator/freezers with separate external doors and compartments. Acceptable storage may be achieved in standard household freezers purchased in the last 10 years, and standard household refrigerator/freezers with a separate, sealed freezer compartment. "Dormitory-style units" are not appropriate for the storage of zoster vaccine. Do not store lyophilized vaccine in the refrigerator. Protect the vaccine from light at all times since such exposure may inactivate the vaccine virus.
In order to maintain temperatures of
5°F (-15°C) or colder, it will be necessary in most refrigerator/freezer models to turn the temperature dial down to the coldest setting. This may result in the refrigerator compartment temperature being lowered as well. Careful monitoring of the refrigerator temperature will be necessary to avoid freezing killed or inactivated vaccines.
Diluent: May be refrigerated or stored at room temperature (68° – 77°F [20° – 25°C]). Do not freeze or expose to freezing temperatures.
Shelf Life
Check expiration date on vial.
Instructions for Reconstitution and Use
Reconstitute just before use according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use only the diluent supplied to reconstitute the vaccine.
Shelf Life after Reconstitution, Thawing or Opening
Single-Dose Vials: Discard reconstituted vaccine if it is not used within 30 minutes of reconstitution. Do not freeze reconstituted vaccine.
Special Instructions
Rotate stock so that the earliest dated material is used first.
If this vaccine is stored at a temperature warmer than 5°F (-15°C), it will result in a loss of potency and a reduced shelf life. If a power outage or some other situation occurs that results in the vaccine storage temperature rising above the recommended temperature, the healthcare provider should contact Merck, the vaccine manufacturer, at
1-800-MERCK-90 for an evaluation of the product potency before using the vaccine.
Note: All vaccine materials should be disposed of using medical waste disposal procedures. Contact the state health department for details.
 
Posts: 2641 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Spanish Revival
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Sparky:
I asked my doctor about getting one at my last physical, he informed me you can't get it until you're 60+, not sure of the exact age but I couldn't get it at 51.


If you've had Chicken Pox you can get the vaccine, you don't have to wait till you're 60+... it's a virus that stays in your system and will manifest itself at anytime. I'm sure your physician is very capable, however he might not be up do date on this particular vaccine.
 
Posts: 908 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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Sherry, double check that your insurance will cover it. I've heard that some don't. And around here, I think its about $200 for the shot, so $700 sounds real high.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6212 | Location: Northwest Florida | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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DH and I both had our shingle shots last summer after several friends suffered needlessly for months. We went to Walgreens. I believe our Medicare deductible was $70.00 each. I had inquired from several sources prior and no shot was ever quoted as over $300(at least that was what my old age 69 year old brain remembers). Get the shot and save yourself potential misery.
 
Posts: 3054 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Thanks FFG...

Well I don't know where I saw the $700 fee. I did an online look and several sites stated $200 - $250. Still pricey but not like $700.

My insurance is supposed to cover it...but even if I have to pay it, sounds better than a shingles outbreak. shudder

And the age requirement varies from site to site. I saw 50 and 60...so it would depend on your doctor.
 
Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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Sherry the FDA only has a single vaccine licensed for Shingles that reduces the risk of reactivation of the varicella zoster virus. The following is from the FDA website and the page was last updated on 1/12/2012. -

Zostavax (Herpes Zoster Vaccine) Questions and Answers


Zostavax is an FDA licensed vaccine that helps to reduce the risk of getting herpes zoster (shingles) in individuals 50 years of age and older. Zostavax is the only US licensed vaccine that reduces the risk of reactivation of the varicella zoster virus, the same one that causes chicken pox, and remains dormant in the body after recovering from chicken pox.


What is herpes zoster (shingles) and how commonly does it occur?

Anyone who has had chicken pox is at risk for developing shingles. It is estimated that 1 million or more cases occur each year in the United States. Shingles can occur in people of all ages and the risk increases as people get older. When shingles develop, a rash or blisters appear on the skin, generally on one side of the body. This is a sign that the virus, that has been dormant in the nerve cells, has reactivated and traveled from the nerves and followed a path out to the skin.


Because the nerves along the path become inflamed, shingles can also be painful. Pain that lasts for months after the rash has healed is called post herpetic neuralgia or PHN. For some people, this pain can be severe and chronic.


Does Zostavax help with post herpetic neuralgia?

In people who were 70 years of age and older, and still developed shingles, even though they had been vaccinated, Zostavax reduced the frequency of PHN, the pain associated with the illness. Overall, the benefit of Zostavax in preventing PHN is due to the effect of the vaccine on reducing the risk of developing herpes zoster (shingles). Zostavax will not work to treat PHN.


What causes herpes zoster (shingles)?

The causes aren't completely known, but it is thought that a combination of factors can trigger shingles, including aging and problems with the immune system.


How is Zostavax given?

Zostavax is given as a single dose by an injection under the skin, preferably in the upper arm.


How well does Zostavax work to prevent herpes zoster (shingles)?

For people 60 years of age and older, the studies for Zostavax enrolled approximately 38,000 people throughout the United States; approximately half received Zostavax and half received placebo. Study participants were followed on average for about three years to see if they developed shingles and if they did, how long the pain lasted.
At the conclusion of the studies, researchers found that overall (in persons age 60 years and older) the vaccine reduced the occurrence of herpes zoster (shingles) by about 50%. The vaccine effect was highest at 64% in people between the ages 60-69, but its effectiveness declined with increasing age; to 41% for the 70-79 age group, and 18% for those 80 years of age and older.


In those who were vaccinated with Zostavax, but still developed shingles, the duration of pain was a bit shorter for them versus those who received a placebo. Specifically, the pain of those in the Zostavax group lasted on average for 20 days and for those who received placebo, it lasted for about 22 days. The severity of the pain did not appear to differ among the two groups.


For people 50-59 years of age, approximately 22,000 people were studied; half received Zostavax and half received a placebo. Study participants were then monitored for at least one year to see if they developed shingles. Compared with placebo, Zostavax reduced the risk of developing shingles by approximately 70 percent.


Are there any possible adverse reactions associated with the use of Zostavax?

As with all medications, adverse reactions, including serious reactions, can occur. The most frequent adverse reactions reported for Zostavax were headache and injection-site reactions.


Who should not be immunized with Zostavax?

People who are allergic to neomycin, or any component of the vaccine should not receive Zostavax. Zostavax is a live vaccine and should not be given to individuals who have a weakened immune system caused by treatments that they are taking such as radiation, a class of drugs called corticosteroids, or due to conditions such as AIDS, cancer of the lymph, bone or blood.


In addition, Zostavax should not be used by women who are or may be pregnant.
Zostavax should not be used in children and it is not a substitute for Varivax, the vaccine to prevent chicken pox.


Also, people who are in close contact with pregnant women who have not had chickenpox should talk to their healthcare provider to decide if using Zostavax is right for them.


Should Zostavax be used in people who are under 50 years of age?


No, at this time, there is not enough information from the studies to determine the risks and benefits of Zostavax in people younger than 50 years of age.


Should someone who has already had shingles use the vaccine, so that they don't get them again?

An episode of shingles boosts immunity to the virus and may help protect you from getting shingles again. Although it is uncommon, some people may get shingles more than once. The effectiveness of Zostavax in preventing repeated episodes of shingles has not been demonstrated in clinical studies.


How can I report a serious side effect with Zostavax, or other vaccines, to FDA?

Adverse reactions and other problems related to vaccines should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is maintained by FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For a copy of the vaccine reporting form, call 1-800-822-7967 or report on line to http://www.vaers.hhs.gov.
-
Related Information

Zostavax
Product Approval Information

-

Contact FDA
(800) 835-4709
(301) 827-1800
ocod@fda.hhs.gov
Consumer Affairs Branch (CBER)

Division of Communication and Consumer Affairs

Office of Communication, Outreach and Development

Food and Drug Administration

1401 Rockville Pike

Suite 200N/HFM-47
Rockville, MD 20852-1448

http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBl...ccines/ucm070418.htm

This message has been edited. Last edited by: still tryin,
 
Posts: 2641 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My Dr. told me to go to retail pharmacy to get shot as it would be much cheaper than done in his office. Good guy to tell me that. We also had no adverse reaction to shingles shot. That very same day I had the Syn visc big shot in my knee and a steroid shot in my shoulder from my ortho doc- didn't wince or cry, but got no suckers or stickers for being so braveSmile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: mamaspoon,
 
Posts: 3054 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Spanish Revival
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Shingles may develop in any age group, but you are more likely to develop the condition if:

You are older than 60

You had chickenpox before age 1

Your immune system is weakened by medications or disease

If an adult or child has direct contact with the shingles rash and did not have chickenpox as a child or a chickenpox vaccine, they can develop chickenpox, not shingles.
 
Posts: 908 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Think- Barbara Walters, hospitalized for a fall and now suffering from chicken pox at age 83. That must be a rare occurrence at her age.
 
Posts: 3054 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Grapefruit
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My friend got the vaccine, and still got shinglesFrown.
 
Posts: 3033 | Location: central PA | Registered: Jan 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I never accept prescriptions for any product that has less than 10 years of proven safety track record. If it comes down to life or death, I'd consider it, of course. Otherwise, no. I'd rather risk the disease than to risk the side effects of the Big Pharma chemical soups.

The likely reason you're seeing more and more cases of shingles isn't because the population is aging; it's because of the chickenpox vaccine. It's now believed that elders who used to be regularly exposed to children with chickenpox got a natural "booster shot" of sorts from it that kept the virus inactive. Now that kids don't get pox, elders get shingles.
 
Posts: 4342 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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According to that CDC site, I should NOT get the shot.
I've had radiation treatments. I also had chicken pox when I was 27-28 yrs. old...right around my birthday! My son gave it to me...he had 36 spots on his entire body, I had 40 just on my nose! I was out of work for 6 weeks. I had it ever place you could imagine and a few you can't! NOT FUN!!!!!!!!!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Kathy_in_wlsv
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I had shingles about 3 years ago...NOT pleasant.

Dh asked our dr about getting the vaccine but was told that because our little girl had gotten chicken pox even though vaccinaated against them, that living with her was like getting the shot. We shall see.

If you can afford it get the shot. Long term neuropathy is not fun to live with.


Life is GOOD!!
 
Posts: 1509 | Location: Upstate NY | Registered: Nov 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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OK, have to weigh in here. I'm not sure if I did have the Chicken Pox (I know both of my older sisters did and one got the shingles last year). SO, do I get the shingles vaccine if I'm not sure that I even had the chicken pox that leaves the shingles dormant in my body? Or is that just asking for trouble?

Inquiring minds want to know....
 
Posts: 6487 | Registered: Jan 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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IR, When I was pregnant, after an initial visit to my ob/gyn where I told her that I'd had all the childhood illnesses - on the next visit I told her that I'd remembered that I'd never had mumps. She looked at my chart and said, you must've had a natural immunity to it then - something about the blood test...

So perhaps, they can tell from a blood test whether you've had CP or not. ???
 
Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of still tryin
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quote:
Originally posted by Idaho Resident:
OK, have to weigh in here. I'm not sure if I did have the Chicken Pox (I know both of my older sisters did and one got the shingles last year). SO, do I get the shingles vaccine if I'm not sure that I even had the chicken pox that leaves the shingles dormant in my body? Or is that just asking for trouble?

Inquiring minds want to know....


You can have a viral test done to determine if you had chicken pox. Your body's immune system develops antibodies after being infected with chicken pox and the antibody test will detect them if they are present.
 
Posts: 2641 | Registered: Jan 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spanish R, sooo glad you introduced this topic!
As a child I endured a severe case of chicken pox; as an adult I watched as my elders suffered with recurring shingles... my uncle for decades!
As soon as the vaccine was available, I requested & recieved the preventative "shot".
My Dr warned that my insurance might not pay (it did) and that the vaccine is not 100% guaranteed to prevent shingles.
So I say to the doubters: talk to your doctor.
IMO better to be kinda safe than to be painfully sorry!
 
Posts: 5029 | Location: NE of S.F. | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Forgot to add: For over a year Walgreens, CVS other pharmacies have advertised $25 flu shot, and $35 for shingles vaccination.
If your medical provider reccommends innoculations and charges more - WHY?

Idaho, I too have an inquiring mind Smile
which is why some posts are sufficiently "interesting" to generate further research more personally applicable.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: tessa89,
 
Posts: 5029 | Location: NE of S.F. | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Beau's Rose
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Thanks for the helpful reminder about the vaccines.

I just inquired at my doctor's office and they will start the insurance process at my next visit.

Tessa, thanks for the information on the pharmacy options too!


~Like sands through the hourglass
~So are the days of our lives
 
Posts: 9325 | Registered: Oct 09, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We are both on Medicare and both of us got our shingle shots last summer. Don't know if it makes a difference, but we also have part D prescription coverage.
 
Posts: 3054 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
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Flboy, the only thing that proves is your doctor should be ashamed of himself! And if I were your sister I would be looking for a new doctor.

Plus, if you turn on your television there are advertisements all day long about the shingles virus. I think the retired fireman is part of my family.

Even though Medicare doesn't cover it, from previous posts it is covered under Part D.

DH kept after me to get the vaccine. I thought I'd had the chicken pox, but wasn't sure. My sister was around one day when we were having the discussion and informed me that the child in the family with 1 chicken pox was her, not me. Good thing she mentioned it.
 
Posts: 3400 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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quote:
I believe our Medicare deductible was $70.00 each. I had inquired from several sources prior and no shot was ever quoted as over $300(at least that was


Mamaspoon the problem with medicare coverage supplamental policies (which I'm assuming you have if you have part D insured.) is that the policies and what they cover differ from state to state and also of course from insurance company to insurance company. Our policy does not cover the shingles vaccine.

Can't remember cost of this vaccine but I remember thinking at the time that I could not afford it. DH did have shingles and they were painful but don't believe it lasted months and months.
 
Posts: 12148 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Whether or not the shot is covered depends on your insurance. It also depends on whether or not it is covered under your prescription/drug coverage or only under your medical coverage. Drug stores can only bill under drug coverage, so if your insurance covers it as a medical charge, you cannot go to a drug store. None of the local drug stores carry it in my area. It is not available at most doctors' offices. I live in a large metropolitan area with large hospitals, they only carry it in their infectious disease clinics for people with compromised immune systems--e.g. AIDS patients, no one else can go there. I finally got my shot from a county clinic which also carries travelers shots, etc. The cost in my area is around $200--I have never heard of a $70 shot anywhere. The vaccine as mentioned above is very hard to store, must be stored in 2 separate components, mixed and administered in no more than 1 hour. It is about 50% effective so it will lessen the severity of an shingles episode. I don't know what effect the Affordable Care Act has on this shot since it covers preventative shots 100%.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: 16paws,
 
Posts: 3048 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of luvtoflip
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After seeing those commercials about shingles, I decided that I would ask my primary care doctor during my next visit.

He quickly informed me that I would NOT be allowed to have the vaccine due to being a kidney transplant patient. Apparently the vaccine is a live virus (on my list of "can't have's). UGH

I saw both my parents go through shingles. My mother had it the worst.Frown She was miserable.

I'm 52 right now...just hoping and praying I don't get the shingles. Guess that's all one can do in my situation.

I was wondering though if anyone might know if working with children for 30 years may have given my some sort of "boost" agaist getting shingles?

That said, I HAD to inform parents that if they thought their child/children had chicken pox...to please not bring them to class! Actually, they were great about that.
However, I never really know if a child was infected during class only to break out the next day or so???

Again...just hope not to go down that path.

Smile


"Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened"
 
Posts: 2867 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: Oct 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also got the vaccine at Walgreen's with no prescription, I just walked in and requested it, mine was free with my insurance plan (not medicare).
 
Posts: 2438 | Location: Southern CA (Southbay) | Registered: Nov 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another vaccine my physician recommends prevents viral Pneumonia. (insurance paid 100%). Also because we eat out frequently and had booked a cruise, he recommended innoculations to avoid Hep A.

Slightly OT, MediCare year-to-date summary of prescription coverage states "Please refer to your Evidence of Coverage for important information about manufacturer discounts that may be available when your total drug costs reaches $2,970.00"
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This message has been edited. Last edited by: tessa89,
 
Posts: 5029 | Location: NE of S.F. | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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flboy, goodness! Hate to hear that. I'm sure that was NOT fun!! Yeah, DDT is not a good thing to be around from what I understand. All I know is that I cannot have the vac.

Tessa89, I was able to have the pneumonia vac (since it's not a live virus). I think that one lasts a few years (can't remember exactly how long). My doc should have the record of it and let me know when it's due again.
He's pretty good about letting me know when he thinks I need to anything done. For example, he tells me that it's time for me to have a colonoscopy! YIKES! I realize it isn't a big ordeal, but it's not something I'm looking forward to getting done! I think they recommend having that at around age 50. I'm 52 and so far I haven't done it...but I'm sure it's in my future.;(

Paula~Smile


"Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened"
 
Posts: 2867 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: Oct 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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flboy, Yeah, I will do it. I need to get through neck surgery first...heal from that then hopefully check into the colonoscopy. It's been a challenging year for me. I had total shoulder replacement in January (that wasn't fun). It took what seemed like forever before I could use my arm. Good news is that I can actually lift that arm all the way up...which is something I hadn't been able to do in YEARS! Then I had to deal with some skin cancer issues (removal)...and that's also been a stinker. Immune suppressed people simply do not heal as quickly as the average person..unfortunately.Frown

Funny story about going with my dad for his colonoscopy (true story). They wanted to check "both ends" with him, so when he was feeling a little woozy, he asked the nurse to make sure to tell the doctor to please do the upper end before doing the bottom end.LOL
Cracked me up!Smile Giggles around the room when he said that.

Anyway, I promise to get it done.


"Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened"
 
Posts: 2867 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: Oct 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Doctors are a bit lax when people get old.[/QUOTE]

I think people get lax when people get old, they don't visit the Dr. as frequently as they should. If you aren't seeing your Dr. on a regular basis he/she has no idea what you're up to... maybe you're going to someone else, you moved away, etc. Not every patient keeps their Dr. informed. I'm a firm believer in taking responsibility for your own health.
 
Posts: 908 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spanish Revival, I couldn't agree more regarding that people aren't in the habit of at least having a regular check-up. Doctors sure can't read minds so it's up to us (as patients) to inform them of any changes, concerns, questions, etc.

I realize going to the doctor is not something any of us really WANT to do. But I feel it is important to be responsible enough to care about one's own health matters.

I have seen so many friends/relatives who...had they been diagnosed early enough, things could have been taken care of and/or eliminated completely...but they simply waited too late or chose to "put it off".

Sorry to go into a bit of a rant, but it happens all the time! Your health is (in my opinion) everything!

I guess at this point in my life, I've learned that it is better to be safe than sorry, ya know?


"Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened"
 
Posts: 2867 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: Oct 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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After having shingles in June of 2011, I am still suffering the aftereffects the upper left quadrant of my face and head are still numb, the itching is unreal although it is much less severe than it was. I got the vaccine after the out break, I recommend getting the vaccine no matter what it costs.
 
Posts: 809 | Location: Lexington, MI | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Today's paper had an obituary of a man that DH used to know. He died at 87 after shingles infected his brain.

Guess I will look into the vaccine.
 
Posts: 12148 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I did have the shot but had the shingles just the same. Doctor said that my case would be less severe because of have the shot. I took meds for 7 days and had pain for about 2 weeks. First week was the worst the second week on and off. The rash lasted for about a month total and was not that bad a little itchy but with a anti-itch cream not a big problem. Compared to what I've heard others say about their shingles(some lasting over a year), mine was a breeze. So I would suggest getting the shot.
 
Posts: 364 | Registered: May 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A good idea before your regular scheduled doctor's visit...make a list of everything to ask your doctor or tell your doctor.
Worried about the side effects of a med you are taking...write it down.
Have a new bump, sore spot, etc....write it down.

Trust me...you will forget something!

My appointments are near the end of October. I've started my list. Thank goodness it's a short one! Wink But the shingles shot is on it.
 
Posts: 16486 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A list of who should NOT get the shots...

Who Should NOT Get the Vaccine

Some people should NOT get shingles vaccine.
•A person who has ever had a life-threatening or severe allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
•A person who has a weakened immune system because of ◦HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
◦treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids,
◦cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy,
◦cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma.

•Women who are or might be pregnant

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vp...s/vacc-need-know.htm


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had shingles on side of neck and front (on that side) IT was horrible itch and discomfort but my Doctor started me immediately on the same medicine they use for Herpes and I had it for about 8 days and then it started to go away NEVER to return.
 
Posts: 1708 | Location: Allentown PA USA | Registered: Oct 03, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yet. Shingles hasn't returned YET.

You have the virus in your nervous system. Right now its dormant. It may come back. It probably will come back some day. And your doctor can give you that same treatment - the herpes treatment to interupt the illness and something to hide the pain while the real treatment is working.

Disclaimer: I work in the pharmaceutical industry. I have worked for the drug companies that make the herpes treatment and the shingles vaccine.
 
Posts: 8582 | Location: Omaha, Nebraska, USA | Registered: Oct 13, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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About 8 years ago I too got Shingles, following four years of caring for my Dad who was terminal. Obviously, my stress levels were high. Started on a Friday with tiny deep red dots forming a rash just under my underarms...I thought it was heat rash or clothing had rubbed..it was painful, felt like burning and I had a bit of a fever. I called the doctor's office on Monday but couldn't see him until Tuesday...he recognized Shingles and gave me a prescription for the anti-viral, but cautioned me that it may not work because you have a short window of opportunity to start it or it is useless. Well three weeks later it had now developed into a worse condition...PHN a condition known as post-herpetic neuropathy. I had feelings like I was being bitten all over one side especially the midrif, would wake up with stabbing (like a sword) had gone through my side...I even had to take tranquillizers for awhile. That was years ago, and now, whenever I get a cold, flu, arthritis acts up, the PHN reappears and will all my life. So, be aware that shingles can look like nothing at all but get to Emergency immediately for the antiviral or you will suffer from the after effects indefinitely.
 
Posts: 735 | Location: Canada | Registered: Jan 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Flboy, apparently shingles acts differently in different people to some extent. Isn't that true of just about anything? My mothers reoccurred for 40 years in times of stress mostly. My brothers has not had it reoccur over a period of 20 years, though that does not forecast the future.
 
Posts: 6728 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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