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Picture of Gladdie
posted
My husband has agreed that we need to ditch the stainless gas stove with the black top that NEVER looks clean, despite the fact that I clean it every day. I definitely want white, but would like input as to whether to go with gas, electric, smooth cooktop, burners, etc. I truly will value any input you care to give.
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Michigan | Registered: Dec 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I like gas. I have cooked with gas all but seven years of my cooking life-time. That seven year period was on an electric cooktop, glass with solid cast iron burners. I had a pot and one cast iron skillet I could not use. The bottom had to fit flat on the burner. The big pot had a rounded bottom...cheap pot but it had its purpose. The cast iron skillet had a ridge around the bottom that held it off the burner so, therefore, would not heat.

I've also cooked with on electric stoves with the coiled burner in kitchenettes while on vacation.

I adapted, but am back cooking with gas. I have a flame I can see and I know that when I turn the dial down, the heat immediately diminishes and I do not have to move the pot/pan/skillet off that burner until it does.
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gladdie
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Thank you. I have always had gas stoves for the same reason as you. Haven't had any experience with electric. I was thinking electric only because the smooth cooktop would be easier to clean. The stove I have now is such a nightmare to clean, and never really looks clean. I know I want a white stove, and I think that will be easier than what I have now, so maybe I'll consider going with a white gas stove.
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Michigan | Registered: Dec 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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I cooked with gas the in first 6 years of marriage. Then we moved to a house with an electric coiled burner stove. I HATED it, but was stuck with it for 22 years because I couldn't afford to change it until the kids left home. I'm back to gas since 1998 and would have it no other way.

When shopping for a gas stove, don't consider any without sealed burners. That's a must for easiest cleaning.
 
Posts: 4622 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gladdie
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Thanks. I'm not sure what sealed burners are, but I will check that out and make sure I look for that. Good grief, it must have been awful cooking on a stove you hated for such a long period of time. I've only had my monster of a stove for about 5 years, and I do like it, except for the cleaning issues. Everything that boils over or spills sticks to it, and I've tried every cleaner, magic eraser, green pads, plastic scrapers. NOTHING works on it. Arrrgh.
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Michigan | Registered: Dec 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Handie Ann
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I have a black glass top stove and love it. I have had a glass top stove for the last 25 years or so and will not change. I do cook on a gas stove in our RV but I love my glass top stove. It is not that hard to clean. I think that you have made up your mind to go with gas.


Handie Ann
 
Posts: 3585 | Location: Des Moines, Wa. USA | Registered: Jan 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gladdie
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Thanks. It helps to get input from others on what they have and if they like it. Especially when I am totally ignorant on the pros and cons, and need to hear from those who have experience.
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Michigan | Registered: Dec 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I have a smooth top, that is okay, but I am very careful not to allow any boil overs or other spill mess that will be hard to clean.
But the other house has a white gas range. And for all the reasons mentioned above, I would always choose gas again, if at all possible.

However any mess or spill on the range is still a mess to clean up...unfortunately.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Any mess on any type stove is a booger to clean. I rarely fry anything any more. When I do, I always use my deep chicken fryer...even if it's just cooking hamburger patties/steaks. And a lid. I HATE cleaning the stove top!
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gladdie
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Thanks everyone. I'm grateful for your wisdom. I know stove messes are no picnic to clean, but in the past I've always been able to clean them. This stove has a demon, I'm convinced. LOL Thanks again.
 
Posts: 42 | Location: Michigan | Registered: Dec 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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LOL I had an avocado green back in the 1970s...80s...and late 90s... It was hard to keep clean. My mother had a 1954 Maytag Dutch oven range. It was so easy to clean! I think it has to do with the thickness of the finish. That thing looked like new when she got rid of it. Unfortunately it needed just about everything else replaced...oven insulation, etc. She sold it locally, but if she'd been able to ship it to California for a "retro" kitchen...

Edited to add: And she fried something just about every single day.
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would say electric, it's alot cleaner to use an electric stove as I use one all the time


Home Decor, coming from the soul.
www.decorativesoul.com
 
Posts: 15 | Location: WA | Registered: Jun 14, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In my experience a black glass top is hard to clean without smudges, especially if it has any light behind it. You can adjust to cook on an electric after you have had gas but the chances are you will not like it

Just moved into house with glass black cooktop and I really dislike it. Just is hard to cook on but with have to live with it for awhile till we can change to gas.
 
Posts: 7206 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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Sealed burners ... Hard to describe in writing. The enameled stovetop extends right up to surround the base of the burners. No opening in that area to where boiled over liquids can run underneath. It's mostly only lower-priced models that have unsealed burners. Anything mid-priced and up will have sealed burners.

I just have a "regular" white enameled stove with black drip pans and black burners. Missed spots that manage to burn on are easily cleaned off with Bon Ami cleanser on a wet rag or sponge. For daily cleanups, I like Formula 409 All-Surface spray. It easily removes the grease and doesn't leave streaks.
 
Posts: 4622 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
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I've used an electric coil burner for the past 15 years. It cooks great and its white. Given my druthers, I'd have a white dual fuel stove. Gas cook top with an electric oven. But, since our house is all electric, that's not gonna happen.

I've cooked on smooth top stoves over the years, going back to when they first came out, either at someone else's house or in a vacation rental. Can't stand them!!! Should I ever buy a house with one in it, it'll be replaced before I move in.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6732 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Oh yes! Dual fuel is the way to go! When we purchased our home in 2004 it was two years old...with a gas cooktop and an electric oven. And...they are white! PERFECT!
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Up in MI all my homes have had gas cooktops- love it. However, as we prepare to go to FL for the winter, my home down there has a black smooth surface electric cooktop, which I really don't like, esp. when my DH wants to fry bacon- UGH, drive myself nuts cleaning it.
To me the advantages of gas are infinite burner temperature control, and once done cooking, the burner cools quickly and food cooks no further.
 
Posts: 3149 | Location: Michigan and sw Florida | Registered: May 16, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Beau's Rose
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I have glass cook top. It's easier for me to clean one flat surface rather than individual burner coils, etc. It usually just takes a quick wipe with the sponge and occasionally the special cleaner. Just a personal preference.

Have you also checked induction? My next replacement stove will be induction. It might have a learning curve but it's another option.

Mamaspoon, I just use a soapy sponge on the cooktop and wipe any bacon grease splatters that may happen. Doesn't the grease get on the gas stove top too?


~Like sands through the hourglass
~So are the days of our lives
 
Posts: 9488 | Registered: Oct 09, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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There are great reasons for both. Smaller kitchens can benefit from having smooth surface. And, yes, there are products that can do an exceptional job at keeping those glass tops clean. (We just can't advertise them here. I'm not a pr person anyway, only a home manager looking for things that work!) Our next stove will be a gas stovetop with a convection oven. I have been able to watch children. Parents have let me cook with their white gas built in Jenn Air range.(NICE!) It looks new, and I know the owners do a lot of cooking. When I was younger, living in an apartment with an older gas freestanding range, I always said I could smell "gas". I wasn't impressed. Then, I lived in another apartment with a gas range and there wasn't any odors. It cooked much better than the electric ranges. If you are a "foodie", you'll swear by the gas ranges. That's what many of the cooking shows display. We have many professional pans...and I think the gas stovetops would make sense for us. We're impressed with a company who has made some excellent electronic devices, we are interested in the dual range they have built. We're hoping it will be as excellent as our other products. We didn't know they made them until we saw them from Scripps shows. We HAVE investigated them.
Consider this as a Christmas gift..... the nonstick oven liners. It makes keeping the interior ovens cleaner and easier. My daughters enjoyed theirs'. It's even better giving this BEFORE Thanksgiving for those pie bakers you know. Smile
Most of us on the message board have already made their choices, right?
 
Posts: 5231 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Grapefruit
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I have a white, electric, stove with a gray smooth top. Clean up is very easy. I have almost always had electric stoves, as did my mother.

I am not a "real" cook so this has always worked for me. The only downside of the smooth top is that you cannot simmer anything ! It takes too long for the burner to cool down enough to allow simmering.
 
Posts: 3226 | Location: central PA | Registered: Jan 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Mamaspoon - For only a few slices, I use my deep cast iron chicken fryer with a lid for bacon. If I am cooking the works...big breakfast pancakes or biscuits and eggs, I bake bacon!

Either put a cooling rack in a baking dish and place the bacon strips on that or just lay them in the bottom of the baking dish. Bake at 400 degrees. I don't know how long, maybe 10-15 minutes...just watch it.
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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I have a gas cooktop which is separate from my two oven (one is convection) wall ovens. I was raised in a home with gas oven and cooktop and it is far superior for the reasons mentioned. My only regret is that the disks and grid are white and show their age in spite of frequent cleaning. I would have preferred they were a tan to coordinate with those white appliances.

As far as cooking bacon, I prefer to either use the REAL Hormel bacon bits OR cook the bacon on a ribbed micro dish with splatter shield in the microwave. Far less mess!
 
Posts: 18727 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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BTW, I have seen black glass cooktops that have permanent marks on them and some were not that old. I has also heard that if sugar granuals happen to fall on a glass cooktop, they can cause the surface to pit.
 
Posts: 18727 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Used to have electric stoves, then an electric cooktop, Jennair, which was really hard to clean. Finally we got a gas cooktop, Wolf, which is a joy to have. I can use all kinds of pots and pans, it's easy to clean. It heats up quickly and cools down fast. I can't imagine ever wanting to go back to electric again. My daughter's condo has a black smooth surface stove. She has to use specific cookware that fits the burner and it has to be absolutely flat. She almost never cooks but when she does, she has to be super careful not to spill anything on it. I don't ever want to be that concerned about a stove or cooktop again.

Mamaspoon, I always do my bacon in the microwave --that might prevent messes on your stovetop.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: 16paws,
 
Posts: 3226 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of aychihuahua
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I have had electric coils, smooth top electric and gas burners. Give me gas burners anytime; I love my Bosch cooktop.

It's micro-cooking for bacon for me, too. No grease splatters and better grease absorption. Plus, wonderful crispy results.
 
Posts: 5331 | Registered: Jul 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I also cook bacon in the microwave using several paper towels, both under and over, on a plate. No mess, but no easy way to save the grease for other uses.

I have a black smooth top range. (seems this was the common color top for stainless ranges)
If you end up wanting a smooth top and can find a variegated (speckled) color top you will have less issue with dust or spots showing up on the surface. Black shows EVERY little thing, especially with a light behind or above the range top.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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And I'm an electric all the way person here. I learned to cook on a wood cook stove, then we went to propane gas, I hated it. I've had both gas & electric coils over the years and I won't ever go back to gas again.
My DIL had a flat top the last time I visited them, I hated that thing as nearly the whole top got hot even when only one burner was turned on....and it took FOREVER for it to cool down so I could clean it.
Mine is white and I won't ever have another color on appliances either. Easier to keep clean and looks good.

If you learned to cook on gas & have used it for many years, it is hard to adjust to electric and the reverse is true too. You just have to decide which you like to cook with the best...which I think you have already done.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4993 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I read that homes with gas stoves--have trouble with house plants which means it's something in the air that isn't good for humans either.
I lived with gas, electric burners and now a smooth-top black range.
MY smooth-top is over 12 yrs old and looks like new--shines like a mirror and no stains etc. I use ONLY smooth-top stove cleaner and DO NOT USE TOO MUCH--and simple wipe with paper towel--toss the towel and PRESTO--spotless, stainless and perfectly smooth!

I HATED a LOATHED having to clean DRIP PANS--UGGHHH!!! Even with dishwasher!
 
Posts: 1720 | Location: Allentown PA USA | Registered: Oct 03, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Got lots of plants in the house over winter--orchids, begonias, mandevilla, oleanders, etc. None of them suffer from the gas cooktoop, the cats and dogs are always running around them and knocking them over but the gas doesn't harm them.
 
Posts: 3226 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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Propane is a whole other animal from the natural gas we have here in the Midwest, Karen. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be fond of it myself.
Marcy... You might also be thinking of propane gas, too. If propane burners aren't adjusted exactly right, they could produce carbon monoxide and other noxious off-gases, which theoretically could harm plants. Otherwise, you've heard an old wives' tale that doesn't hold water.
 
Posts: 4622 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I'm thinking some of the old gas ranges have had issues, but the newer ones are much better.
I tend to use the range for shorter times, and use a crock pot for longer slow cooking.

Every type of fuel range is going to have cooking differences, and what one gets used to tends to be our favorite. Until this last house, I never would have opted for natural gas as a cooktop. But now it is so nice to turn a burner off, and it is off, (not just doing a slow cool down)

I have heard induction ranges are also pretty good, although more expensive than other types...and you also need special cookware for even, magnetic heat distribution.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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NettieJay, I am afraid you have been misinformed. Both natural gas and propane can produce carbon monoxide. Just about anything that burns produces it including the wood that is in that fireplace. That is why venting and adjustments are so very important and why they recommend a detector for any home that has a burnable fuel of any type.
 
Posts: 7206 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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I've had potted plants for decades...in house with natural gas heat, propane heat, and/or wood heat. I have never lived in an all-electric house...never had a house with electric heat. Granted, there are some plants I just cannot grow. But what I can grow do not suffer indoors during the winter.

There's a tremendous amount of misinformation out there (on several subjects not just gas). If you have a problem with gas fumes or carbon monoxide, you better shut the gas off at the valve coming into the house or get a gas plumber in to check your lines.

We have a carbon monoxide detector in our home...it has never gone off. We had one in our camper, it never went off.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KeepYouInStitches,
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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quote:
Originally posted by metwo:
NettieJay, I am afraid you have been misinformed.

Not so. I've been married to an HVAC guy for 43 years and have learned a lot by osmosis from him. I even "saved" a family of cyber-pen pals once by insisting that the mom leave the house and have her gas appliances checked after she described the CO sickness symptoms they were experiencing. The gas fireplace being used as a supplemental heat source was producing too much CO and making them all ill.

For some reason, there's an unusual tendency for propane burners to burn "rich", producing both soot and noxious fumes than for natural gas burners. I know DH could explain why, but not me.

I am saying that gas appliances that have their burners properly adjusted will not produce enough fumes to kill plants, much less people, in living spaces with adequate air exchange.
 
Posts: 4622 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh, I did not mean to offend.

I just wanted to point out that carbon monoxide is produced by any fuel makes a flame and people should make sure they are properly adjusted/vented.
 
Posts: 7206 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Just a side note to add to this thread?
I have found that CO detectors tend to fail after 7 years or so. They will continue to beep or alert even after replacing the battery or if they are plug in, and will not shut off even if plugged in outdoors. We have had two that did so (and would continue even if you took them outdoors). They were in use for 7-9 years.
I believe there may be a sensor that is subject to failure (it is what I was told by a fireman anyway). So the best cure is to purchase a new one.
Good to know if you are ever given a pre-used one or pick one up at a garage sale. Buy a new one.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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quote:
Originally posted by metwo:
Oh, I did not mean to offend.

Of course you didn't. No offense taken! Big Grin
Marcy's assumption about all gas appliances emitting dangerous fumes needed to be addressed, that's all.

Conrad, I've found that to be true of CO detectors, too. Most people don't know that smoke detectors don't last forever, either.
 
Posts: 4622 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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quote:
Originally posted by conrad:
I have found that CO detectors tend to fail after 7 years or so.


The same is true of smoke alarms too. Both alarms can gather dust and it affects the sensors ability to "sense."
 
Posts: 17255 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of CJO
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This area doesn't have 'natural gas', only propane, so we went with the ceramic stove top. Being black, it shows every little mark/stain. Still, I like it better overall than messing with greasy grates that I would spend wayyyy too much time trying to keep clean!!!

I am concerned about how long all the burners will 'last'; since it's a slide-in stove/oven combo. Guess I should start another thread about that....
 
Posts: 2904 | Registered: Oct 19, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've had a Kenmore Elite induction cooktop for something like 5-7 years now. It's black glass with a strip of stainless steel across the top and bottom. I adore it. I've had a gas stove in my first apt (which when I didn't get it lit fast enough blew open all the windows- luckily they weren't latched) and 2 electric coil stoves since then. I hated taking off knobs and burners to clean.. burners that eventually didn't sit flush (on electric). According to Cooktek- "Because energy is directly transferred within the pan metal, cooking on an electric induction range is extremely fast - even faster than gas."
That also means that less heat is wasted being lost into the environment. Your kitchen stays cooler.
As to smooth black cooktops being hard to clean, I have not experienced that at all. I'm not an expert- there have been boil-overs- but never hard to clean. For hard to clean spots, ust use the paste and off it comes. Usually I just use dish soap on a scrubby sponge.
Will it make you a better cook? Maybe. It made me a better one.. because I never liked to cook on the old electric coil one because I didn't like having to clean it. Bonus: Now husband cooks most of our meals lol- because he started cooking more with the new unit. I tend to be the outside grill master. But my indoor repertoire has expanded exponentially since we bought the induction cooktop. And after this many years it still looks almost new. Has glass not faded, hazed or scratched. There are some scratches on the stainless front edge. The backsplash is reflecting on the rear of the cooktop.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: llazy1,

 
Posts: 657 | Registered: May 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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