Message Boards

Guidelines

  • Please be sure posts are category appropriate.
  • No off-topic or off-color postings.
  • Postings may be deleted at the discretion of HGTV Moderators.
  • No advertising is allowed.
  • Be Nice. No name calling, personal attacks or flaming.
  • Certain words will trigger moderation of the post. These words mostly cover political and religious topics, which are OFF the topics covered by HGTV.
  • For general message board help, click the tab labeled "Tools," and choose "Help" from the dropdown menu.
Full Guidelines
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Convenience Sign In/Join 
Picture of trish212
posted
Just for entertainment and appreciation for NOW.... We found a show called Edwardian Farms. A few years back there were shows like this about living in a different era in the US. While watching this show, I've found some ideas that we could actually return to for the simplicity. However, I had to laugh when the two guys said they were thankful for the "DIY Stores". That must be our Home Improvement centers, right?

Oh for the conveniences we have today!
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
posted Hide Post
Trish where did you find that show? It sounds interesting.
 
Posts: 13008 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
It's quite interesting!

tubitv I hope this info helps. I did an online search and found the shows, too. I have learned quite a bit about gardening, cooking and cleaning from the past. I had no idea some of the materials used back then. Some of us would have rolled our eyes when hearing some of the materials used.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: trish212,
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
And everything was a lot harder, too!

Martha
 
Posts: 6284 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
This should be required to see, so those who complain would stop complaining.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: trish212,
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
posted Hide Post
It's all over You Tube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0OfKaD8B6g

That's the trailer. Look to the right for episodes.

Anyone remember the PBS shows where families went 'back' to certain decades? One show was back in our pioneer days and several families were involved. The idiocy of the program is that the 'settlers' could not hunt. A member of a local Native American tribe came in and shot a deer (I believe) for them, but that was it. I think it would have been fairer if they'd been able to point at a squirrel and say "bang" then be given the equivalent in chicken/beef/pork/etc. The goal was to plant and harvest for themselves as well as provide feed for animals over the winter. They all pretty much miserably failed in preparation for the winter. One man found a set of old bed springs and put it on his and his wife's bed. LOL

There was another episode in 1800s England in town. The mother is the one who lobbied her family to participate, none of them really wanted to but finally agreed. Mom was the BIGGEST cry baby! The water heater attached to the wood burning stove didn't get the water hot enough for the upstairs bathroom. Poor dear moaned and groaned and never thought about heating water on the stove to fill the tub. AND she was a vegetarian but bought sausages from a butcher who delivered to her as though it was the 1800s and he still traveled door to door. She squalled and bawled over cooking the sausages for her family. I mean she sat on the back steps and cried!
 
Posts: 17311 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Florida Farm Girl
posted Hide Post
We watched a couple of those shows and loved them. Didn't see the New England one, though. One was near the Bear Tooth Mountains of Montana. The guy worked hard and lost some weight. He was convinced he was deathly ill and insisted on being seen by several doctors. They ALL told him that he was actually at the ideal weight and was overweight when he started the program. He was not a happy camper. There was another younger couple who coped very well, and they may have been on the same show. Too long ago to remember all the details.


www.floridafarmgirlsworld.blogspot.com


Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain.
 
Posts: 6784 | Location: north Georgia mountains  | Registered: Dec 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
FloridaFarmGirl, this isn't a NEW ENGLAND one; this is filmed in the UK. It is well done! The drama element hasn't been a part of this series.
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
posted Hide Post
I saw the English one -- either Edwardian or Victorian England and of course there was "help" -- as I recall -- not a full staff but a daily.

It was interesting but never watched any of the others.

Martha
 
Posts: 6284 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
posted Hide Post
FFG I think that's one of the same that I watched. They also told him that he was getting dehydrated and to be sure to drink plenty of fluids. His wife turned into a right smart pie baker on her wood burning stove. She made pies and bartered them for items from people who lived outside of the area where they were located. She sold some through a local store. Others she traded with local residents for meat from their freezer. There was a bit of controversy about whether she was "playing by the rules" and it was decided that what she was doing was okay. The had I think two daughter's and one son. The girls refused to help Mom with the housework. That was another criticism that the "judges" gave.

There was another couple with a grandpa and some kids. The boy cried and cried when they butchered a hen that had quit laying. The boy had named them...

There was also a mixed race couple (black/white) which would've been highly unusual for those days. Even though they had no children, a "town hall meeting" was held to discuss whether their future children could go to school with the white kids...it was actually illegal during the time frame that they went "back to"... It was, of course, approved.

Sound familiar?
 
Posts: 17311 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
posted Hide Post
I've not watched any of those shows - sounds like Survivor with families. Eek

But on the topic of "convenience" haven't we always been looking for more convenient way of doing things. At the turn of the previous century there were so many inventions for the home that were designed to make like easier for the homemaker. Early versions of vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, washing machines, etc. were invented and advertised for the home.

The search for convenience led to many of the products we love to hate today - canned soup, frozen dinners and don't forget - sliced bread. So many things for that search for an easier workload.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3603 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
I have been researching Science and technology of that period. It was mentioned in this program how important this time was for MANY inventions. They mentioned: Einstein, Planck, many Nobel prizes awarded, Wright brothers and many others. The first vacuum cleaners were NON electric, they were demonstrated in one of the episodes. It took two women to work ONE vacuum. The woman in the show explained how "help" was needed for the estates. She also demonstrated how the directions for bicycle riding was done. I always thought how odd the seats were so high. THen, she had her long dress on; there was no other way to ride a bike with the long skirts.

As I have said before, this show is from the UK.
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
We've been canning and freezing, too. This way we'll be ready for the winter.

I'm thankful we can plug in our irons and they heat up vs. using the woodstove to heat up the irons and hope they aren't TOO hot.
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
posted Hide Post
Since I grew up poor and on a farm, I've done many of the things ya'al talk about.
I learned to cook on a wood cook stove, we heated both water (in the reservoir) and the irons on the stove. We also put baby lambs in the oven in winter to keep them warm until they could take care of themselves...or until mama would care for them properly.
We didn't have running water, we had a cistern pump in the corner of the kitchen. We had an outhouse.
Only the living room & kitchen were heated in the winter, I slept between 2 feather beds!
Baths were taken in wash tubs behind the stove in winter and on the screen porch in the warmer months.
We grew nearly all of our own food...mostly bought flour, sugar & coffee.
We even had flour sacks that my grandmother used to make clothes...bloomers (panties) and blouses usually. The plain white ones were used for dish cloths.
Very little went to waste! It was used in some way even if it was fed to one of the animals or put into our compost pile.

And you know what? We still had time to go to town all day every Saturday, to church on Sundays and then either take long rides or visit friends/relatives or have them to our house. We ate nearly every meal together as a family and we TALKED to each other.

And BTW...you "test" the iron to see if it is hot enough or too hot...wet your finger and barely touch the iron...you learn how to tell pretty quick! Big Grin

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5046 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Wow, GA karen! (I knew about the iron test. My gram must have done that.)
 
Posts: 6086 | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
posted Hide Post
Don't forget, old ironing board covers had scorch marks from testing the iron to make sure it was not too hot for the fabric. Wink

We spent a winter in a house like that. It wasn't a working farm so no lambs, etc. but the wood stove, cistern, out house all bring back memories.

That is why I have an up and down vacuum, dishwasher, washer, dryer, HVAC, ceiling fans, easy care clothes, 2 1/2 bathrooms, etc. I love supermarkets and like opening the refrigerator or freezer to get what I need.

Sorry, none of this back to the good ole days for me!

As for having time, my mother while a fairly good a maintaining the house, had my sister and me as a large part of her labor force! Unlike today where mom is expected to be the cook, maid, chauffer, etc. There is little or no expectations for kids to contribute to the family these days.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Charming,


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3603 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
posted Hide Post
Remember ironing a starched white shirt and scorching a perfect iron mark on the shirt. Oops.

Speaking of starch. Mama would make cooked starch. She starched and ironed Daddy's jeans with perfect creases first. Waiting in a bag in the refrigerator were all the starched shirts she didn't have time to iron right then. But you can bet she'd have it all done within a day or so. I remember her storing a jug of starch in the refrigerator. One day older DB grabbed the jug of water and took a big swig of it. How in the world he confused the water jug and the starch jug will forever be a mystery. But you can bet he did it only once. Bwahahahaha
 
Posts: 17311 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
posted Hide Post
We weren't farm folks so no jeans for my father or anyone in our family until the very late 1970's!

Daddy drove a truck and was gone a week at a time. One of my chores was ironing his clothes for my mother to pack. So I learned at an early age how to iron, starch and fold a button front shirt, press khakis with a perfect crease, handkerchiefs, and anything else that might have wrinkles from hanging out on the clothes line.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3603 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
posted Hide Post
We lived amongst the farmers growing up. No farm, just a house with a lot of reconstruction done to it to bring it up with "modern" conveniences. Most farmers had the modern conveniences our shack was missing. It was a good thing our neighbor knew about construction.

Fresh produce from the veggie garden can't be beat! Didn't get to have one until the past four years. We can tell the difference in our produce when we use rain water vs garden hose. Produce from stores...it either has flavor, or it doesn't.
 
Posts: 5235 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
posted Hide Post
Trish, Have you thought about putting in rain barrels?

I do prefer veggies from the farmer's market but not available in the winter.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3603 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
posted Hide Post
Charming, DD was a truck driver too. He wore 501 button front Levis pretty much all the time.

See that crease. Wink
DD hauled boats coast to coast until about 1961 when Lone Star Boat Company sold out to Chrysler boats. He tried working for them but it didn't work out. After that he hauled gravel, big freight, pipe, food...whatever it took to make a living.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: KeepYouInStitches,

 
Posts: 17311 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Charming
posted Hide Post
I guess some things were regional.


Fun and Info
 
Posts: 3603 | Location: Coastal SC | Registered: Jan 10, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
posted Hide Post
And what the company allowed. After all, I am in Texas. Wink
 
Posts: 17311 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

HGTV.com    HGTV Message Boards  Hop To Forum Categories  At Home  Hop To Forums  Cleaning & Organizing    Convenience