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posted
I love the architecture of Andreo Palladio, hands down, no question. But I hate all the fake arched windows you see in suburbia with the plastic mullions sandwiched between plates of glass like the villans in Superman. No one ever does the right window treatments for them anyway, so why are they so popular? Thoughts/ opinions?
 
Posts: 1736 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You do see a lot of those here. Not so much the new construction that is going in, but seems the ones in the last 15 years or so. And yes, they're difficult to deal with when you're trying to stay true to the house and still make the casual Texas client happy. Out of curiosity, Charles, how do YOU dress those windows?
 
Posts: 4292 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Whelp, they are better when they are made out of either spanish cedar or mahogany, but that isn't so common away from my area.


<spanish cedar looks like mahogany only is alot more insect and rot resistant, but be warned it is not a good tasting wood>


"The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but how well he fixes them."
 
Posts: 152 | Registered: Feb 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My favorite solution for arched windows is to mount pleated panels onto an upholstered frame made of a flexable wood board that has been curved to fit the arch.Since Palladian style windows are very formal architecturally, I usually use decorative tie backs. The Twiggy Collection and The Ebony Collection from Houles are my current favorite trim collections for modern tie backs.
 
Posts: 1736 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We have several tops of the windows like that in our house. I don't cover those. I put my drapes just over the window parts.
 
Posts: 1115 | Location: North Carolina Close to Charlotte | Registered: Apr 02, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by kayhil:
We have several tops of the windows like that in our house. I don't cover those. I put my drapes just over the window parts.


Sort of like putting makeup on the bottom of your eye and nothing on the lid, IMHO.
 
Posts: 1736 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Charles D:
quote:
Originally posted by kayhil:
We have several tops of the windows like that in our house. I don't cover those. I put my drapes just over the window parts.


Sort of like putting makeup on the bottom of your eye and nothing on the lid, IMHO.


Big Grin, but were the originals dressed? I'd love to see examples of Palladio originals with drapes. Not being difficult, just curious.

That said, I've always felt they were pretentious in modern architecture, with the exception of public buildings. Just me.


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3637 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think Palladian windows can be a challenge. Whenever I think of Palladian windows I think of the White House, and the window in the west sitting hall. I found some pictures on the web of the window dressed during different administrations. This is during the Kennedy years. Not loving the look. At all.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: cocok,

 
Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Then here is the window later done for the Reagans.

 
Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think this was the Clinton years, but I am not positive.

 
Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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And one more, not sure of the administration. I like this one best, as I am drawn to simplicity.

This window is a difficult challenge for sure! I also like that you can see the top of the arch in this version.

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Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here are some windows at the White House dressed something like Charles described. I think it looks nice, but just wondering, am I the only one who sees a little girl with no bangs and blond pigtails in each window?

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Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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And then here is a photo I took at Versailles, of a window treatment that has been historically restored. So Belstone, I think this would qualify as how an original would have been dressed. (at least In France) Came back to say the the shutters fold up against the edges of the deep window when not needed, leaving the view clear and open.

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Posts: 7076 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks cocok, but I was actually referring to a Palladio original from the 1500's. Those are lovely dressings, though.

Can't see a little girl at all, but maybe the picture is too small?

ETA: You did, however, strengthen my belief that Palladian windows are best left to public buildings.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Belstone,


**Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...it's about learning to dance in the rain**
 
Posts: 3637 | Location: Here, by the grace of God... | Registered: Jan 24, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
but just wondering, am I the only one who sees a little girl with no bangs and blond pigtails in each window?

Nope, you are not alone Big Grin The heads of the men almost provide a chin???
 
Posts: 6728 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In my dream home I want them; but don't intend to cover them Wink
 
Posts: 2775 | Registered: Oct 19, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Charles, I seldom disagree w/ you bud, but MUST on this topic. I have a passion for palladian windows tho I don't have them in my home (much to my dismay). I DO have a half round window (w/ fake mullions) above my front door and love it. If budget allowed, it would be filled w/ REAL beveled glass. You must understand that I am drawn to curves whether it's round, half round, arched, scrolls. I love anything that's cut out as well...lace, embroidery cutwork, fretwork, lattice, filigree.

I do agree that these elements should be done correctly and elegantly however, but my wallet won't allow for the real deal so I do the best I can in satisfying my passions. If given the chance, I'd fake the palladian windows w/ a half round topper or sunburst on the interior.

I'm sure dressing those windows is a challenge, but again...I am not facing those challenges. I simply love the look on a home that's otherwise linear.
 
Posts: 18386 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Original Palladian windows in the 18th century were commonly not dressed. There really is no need to dress them, unless they face a private area of the home.

I make real Palladian, and other windows, entirely by hand in the 18th century fashion. I don't want to see my work covered up!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: zdillinger,


Zach Dillinger
The Eaton County Joinery
www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com
 
Posts: 7 | Location: United States | Registered: Apr 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Palladian windows by definition are based on the 16th Century architecture of Andrea Palladio. They were intended to be tripartite windows comprised of a center arched window flanked by slighty more narrow side windows.In the 18th Century English architects used them on the second floor as a balancing feature centered above a grand entry door. They often let in light to the landing of the main staircase, and often were not dressed in that instance.

Most people these days use the term Palladian to refer to single windows with an arched top. These windows which were incorporated into 18th C. architecture all over Europe were dressed when they were part of an interior room, and left undressed when they lined a hallway.

The Palladian style is one of grandeur and luxury, added willy nilly to middle class suburban homes,Palladio's genius becomes silly cliches.Like cheap concrete lions in front of a split level. IMHO.
 
Posts: 1736 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Charles D:
Palladian windows by definition are based on the 16th Century architecture of Andrea Palladio. They were intended to be tripartite windows comprised of a center arched window flanked by slighty more narrow side windows.In the 18th Century English architects used them on the second floor as a balancing feature centered above a grand entry door. They often let in light to the landing of the main staircase, and often were not dressed in that instance.

Most people these days use the term Palladian to refer to single windows with an arched top. These windows which were incorporated into 18th C. architecture all over Europe were dressed when they were part of an interior room, and left undressed when they lined a hallway.

The Palladian style is one of grandeur and luxury, added willy nilly to middle class suburban homes,Palladio's genius becomes silly cliches.Like cheap concrete lions in front of a split level. IMHO.


Charles D. is right on. I will add Palladio's original works were studied (some will say copied) by English architects such as Inigo Jones, Christopher Wren and Robert Adam.


Zach Dillinger
The Eaton County Joinery
www.theeatoncountyjoinery.com
 
Posts: 7 | Location: United States | Registered: Apr 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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