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posted
Ok, so just to explain my current situation:

I've been remodeling my new home for the past few months and and down to just needing countertops for my kitchen. Unfortunately due to my limited budget, I can't afford getting granite countertops at this time, so I am looking for real inexpensive alternative that will suffice for the next 6-12 months as I pay off the expenses accumulated from my entire project. Afterwards, I'll invest in the real deal.

I've seen some real nice looking plywood countertops online, but I wanted some advice from others to steer me in a good direction. Again, looking to spend the least amount of $ as possible, but still hold up and look decent.

I'll attach a picture of my kitchen as it stands now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

Kitchen
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: Jan 31, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Since you are only going to have these for half a year or a year I can understand wanting to go inexpensive. But have you actually priced out formica? They have some pretty nice textured types that look good. You may find you delay longer than you planned for the granite...if other projects happen to take presidence.

Just to throw out a really cheap option? If you can do a drop in sink (with a lip) for the time being, maybe just make your own 3/4 inch plywood tops and put vinyl flooring for the counter top. Trim the front edge with some wood or metal edging and maybe a simple wood back splash return to the wall? You will need to be careful with putting hot things on the surface or cutting on it, but it would be cheap and easy to clean.
 
Posts: 9678 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm going to price out the formica this weekend, just to be sure. Believe me, it's frustrating hitting a financial barrier at this stage of the game!

But thank you for the suggestion! I'll definitely take that into account!
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: Jan 31, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Since your cabinet turn two corners off the shelf post form counters won't work. To do it with post form counters you'll need to have them custom made. Still a relatively inexpensive option. The other option would be to make your own laminate counters. It isn't hard, if you've done the work in your kitchen pictured above, you probably have the skills to make your own. I'd use plywood as the base instead of the typical particle board. It handles getting wet better than particle board which swells if it gets wet say around your sink.

Banding the edge with wood, poplar is inexpensive and readily available at the home center is a good option. If you already own a router your tool investment will be pretty inexpensive.

Here is a decent article on the subject.

http://www.hometime.com/Howto/...itchen/kitchen_6.htm

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Sparky,


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6993 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Indexlady
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If you only need something temporary, just cut a thicker MDF board to fit, then put a sealer on it. Cut it a bit larger, then put a cinderblock on it to hold it in place. And just be careful with it.

Laminate countertops, while cheaper than granite, etc., are still quite expensive, particularly for a temporary option.

It won't be pretty, but functional, and more affordable as a temp option.

Just an idea.
 
Posts: 4621 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You most certainly can use post form slabs if you buy the ones with the ends cut on the diagonal...we have bought them from home depot twice now. They also sell the seam adhesive etc that will be needed.
 
Posts: 85 | Registered: Feb 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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To get post form counters with the miters on both ends you need to go custom. They are a bit more expensive but not outrageously so. The home centers have stock runs of post form some with a miter on one end in various configurations, but to put them on both ends requires measuring the location and making them to size.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6993 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When we did need a piece with a mitre on each end we purchased a slab without mitres....the carpenter did the mitres ...big difference in price compared to custom
 
Posts: 85 | Registered: Feb 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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quote:
Originally posted by Nikkea:
When we did need a piece with a mitre on each end we purchased a slab without mitres....the carpenter did the mitres ...big difference in price compared to custom


Did he rout in the cuts to allow the two pieces to be joined together with the special bolts? Or did he just put a piece of wood on the bottom to hold them together? Getting that cut perfect in the field would be very tough.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6993 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Just guessing here, as I don't know if it could work:

Couldn't one more easily just mitre the cut the thin sheets of Formica, (taped together and overlapped)? Then use contact cement them to the ply-base on the cabinets? Have to have an overall pattern style formica and allow enough overhang around the edges to adjust the fit, then router to do the edges? There are wood trim pieces to finish off the outside edges.
 
Posts: 9678 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Conrad,
That would involve making your own laminate counters from scratch rather than using post form stock counters.

When I built mine and the 5' wide sheets of laminate weren't wide enough to do a U shaped counters in one piece, I did do a straight seam and put it at the sink. There is no advantage to doing a miter when building your own countertops. The post form ones do a miter because the backsplash is integral to the countertops. A miter would waste a lot of material. The times I've built counters I mapped out my cuts to minimize the waste.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6993 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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That makes sense Sparky.

Guess I have just preferred the ones "made from scratch" as you say. Seems friends have opted for this if they have not gone to solid granite. They do have some really nice textured/dimensional surface looks to some of the Formica types now.
It seemed that the pre-made ones, with the built in back splash, always seemed minimal quality, in apartments and such?
 
Posts: 9678 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Post form can be an economical solution especially if you have straight runs or L shaped counters. Once you get into U shaped, peninsulas and islands they aren't as economical because you're out of stock counters and into custom.

They are frequently used in apartments and entry level homes with simple kitchen designs. I've built my own twice now and have made them for a desk at my kids private elementary school years ago. I'd like to go to granite at the Casa de Sparky but with one in college and one to follow in 2015 it isn't happening anytime soon. That and I don't see the logic in putting $5k worth of counters on top of 15 year old builder grade cabinets.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6993 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Search online. There are many stores and private individuals who use the internet to sell their products. Without leaving your home, you can easily compare prices and styles of several countertops that may suit your taste.
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: Feb 10, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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