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hot water heater question?? Sign In/Join 
posted
When water FINALLY runs to hottest in kitchen sink... NOT scalding, but can't keep hands under it... have no idea what temp is?? It takes SEVERAL gallons just running down the drain before it's hot. Would it be more efficient to set the water temp a little higher? Or is this a ... six of one, half dozen of the other... situation?
 
Posts: 5575 | Location: mount holly, NJ, USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of nettiejay
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The problem is speed, not temperature. The water heater is at a distance from the faucet that causes the water in the pipe between to cool down between draws. All that water has to be drawn from the pipe before the hot water can flow. Setting the water heater temp higher won't solve the problem and will just waste energy.

About the only way to fix the problem would be to install a 'booster' on the hot water side of plumbing system that will constantly recirculate the water within the hot water pipe. It's not cheap. Trust me. I'd have one if it weren't. Wink

The only other thing that might help is to remove any water-saver inserts in the faucet itself. Newer faucets are all manufactured with them, and most can be removed. That will cause the cold water to be expelled from the pipe faster, but it will also probably cause your water bill to be higher due to the volume of water dispensed being greater.

Edit to add: One more thing that might marginally help is to apply an insulated pipe wrap to that hot water line between heater and faucet. 'Marginally' is the word, but at least that's a cheap fix.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: nettiejay,
 
Posts: 4341 | Location: zone 6b, Missouri | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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You can install one of these below your kitchen sink. It will recirculate the water back down the cold water line. It shuts off when the water temperature reaches 95F at the pump. It also has a timer so you can shut it off when no one is home or overnight. I installed one in our master bathroom which probably has a good 75 feet or more of 3/4" pipe between it and the water heater. I could blow through 5 gallons of water before it got hot at the shower before I installed this. I agree with Nettie that boosting the water temperature won't fix the problem, it will also shorten the life of your water heater.

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/p...ith-timer-42146.html


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.



 
Posts: 6856 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sorry, Sparky; that link locked up my computer for some reason.

I prefer a product called AutoCirc. To my knowledge it does the same thing as the Watts product and it is the original and a bit more compact; I've never tried it but it looks to be very well designed. Neither product wastes water and both should easily solve the problem.

These products need to be plugged in to work the pump, and that should not be a problem in the modern kitchen counter cabinet.
 
Posts: 12155 | Location: Ft Collins, CO USA | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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I have the autocirc. This is what came up when I searched for a hot water recirculation pump. The link works for me.

If you are having a problem at multiple sinks that are spread out in the house there is another unit you place at the water heater and install a cross over unit at the sinks that allow the water to flow back via the cold water line.

https://www.freshwatersystems....rculation-pumps.aspx


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6856 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Bump
 
Posts: 4454 | Location: Texas | Registered: Mar 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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