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posted
Hi,

I have a flower bed that I can no longer take care of. Between weeding and trimming, I just want to get rid of it and convert it back to a lawn. Right now I got rid of all of the plants except 1, which is in my next to-do list.

Now my question is, how do I transform this flower bed back to a grassy lawn? How do I make it level, and when is the best time to plant grass seed? I'm in Ohio area. Should I wait until Fall?

Thank you.
 
Posts: 20 | Registered: Aug 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No reason you can't do it in spring. Rake it level with a garden rake & scatter the seed. Check with your local landscaper or other pro to find out the correct grass seed to use. Is it very large? The pros can tell you how much seed to purchase, too.


~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I've decided to quit my job, drop out of society, and wear live animals as hats."
 
Posts: 7850 | Location: Black Creek, WI Zone 5 | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Or check with your local county extension office to see what they say.
Just remember, that the seed will need moisture to sprout...often.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4997 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Along the lines of this post, how do you what kind of grass you have? Or does any seed just blend in?

I am getting rid of an island bed to reduce the work
 
Posts: 7215 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by metwo:
Along the lines of this post, how do you what kind of grass you have? Or does any seed just blend in?

I am getting rid of an island bed to reduce the work


Take a sample of your grass....pull up some if possible...inside a zip bag to your local county extension office. They should be able to ID it for you and if they can't, they can send it out to the University for an ID!

I had to do that with a tree/shrub we have and learned that I have a native sparkleberry tree.
My extension office had to send it to the UofGa. for the ID, they didn't know....it's in the blueberry family.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4997 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So I dig the old dirt from the flower bed, filled it with top soil and add patchmaster. Now the question is, what do I do with the old dirt? Can I add it into my other flower bed?

Thank you.



 
Posts: 20 | Registered: Aug 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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You shouldn't need to remove the garden soil from your flower bed to make it lawn. If it is raised up from the lawn you'll likely need to level it down to the lawn level. I'd store that soil in a pile somewhere as you may need to add soil to this area as the soil compacts and settles. Garden beds are typically looser than lawn.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6978 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Like Michigan State University, Purdue, and other Midwest Ag Schools Ohio State University will tell you the best time to sow seed for a new lawn is early fall.
Sowing grass seed now means that just about the time the seed germinates and the grass starts to grow the hot dry weather of summer arrives and the grass struggles to grow. Spend this summer getting that plot ready for grass, adjust the soils pH if necessary, add organic matter if necessary, and control any unwanted plant growth, and then seed in late August or early September.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8184 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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