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posted
New on here I look forward to sharing ideas. Currently I am in a predicament. My house is sitting low and the yard slopes toward my foundation. There is currently a french drain in front of the house that was installed by the previous owner. In the attached picture it shows the layout.

The problems I have.
-The yard is too high on the foundation. I need it below the brick.

If I don't have it built up though it has the goofy looking gap where the french drain is.

Any suggestion on any short term things i can do to make this look better would be appreciated. Eventually I need to seal the foundation and I will also regrade the yard at that time.

Is this a good location for a french drain or should I move out where the grass meets the mulch and regrade the yard?

Thanks


Thanks


 
Posts: 1 | Location: Kentucky | Registered: May 15, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How large is that drain? Is it large enough to move all of the water from a very heavy rainstorm?
If grading so that slope no longer exists (daughter had a house with that problem) is not an option the only solution available is a good drain that will move all of the water that rushes down during a heavy rainstorm, located where it will keep that water from getting inside your house.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8118 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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If you intend to re-grade the yard then, at the same time, why not think to put in a 'dry well'.
Depending on just how large the yard is and how much drainage we're speaking of, a dry well might accommodate what heavy rain comes at times.

A dry well---(the size dependent on the amount of water it is supposed to capture) is a large hole which is filled with rock, gravel of different sizes, earth and grassed over.
The water is allowed to percolate down, be captured by the screenings, then filtered down and through the soil sub-structure.

When working well, you never need to worry about how much rainwater accumulates in the back of the yard.

Dry wells can affect wells that might be installed and so should be carefully looked at whether such drainage could change capacity.

You haven't described what lies behind the yard...where such drainage comes from. An open field or farm might have its grading changed to prevent downward drainage to your foundation.
Is it just rainwater that is your problem and where does the french drain empty such runoff.
Of course you're not allowed to have it run onto a neighbor's property.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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