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  mulch from fig tree any useful?
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posted
I had to cut back a sizable portion of our fig tree and I'm wondering if its useful as mulch?

Thanks


P.S. - None of the branches cut down have any leaves or greenery on it at all - the tree usually greens in about 2 months.
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Seattle, WA | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Certainly.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8118 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Ty, without denying the usefulness of why mulching a plant is good, sometimes avoiding its use is also much better for plants.

If the reason for removal of a tree is because it was diseased, or open to infestation of pests, then using its wood in any manner around the garden is inviting those problems to continue.

A better mulch, rather than wood, is what feeds the soil, instead of tying up nitrogen which
wood mulch will do.....COMPOST.

In any case, keep wood mulch away from the base of plants, trees, shrubs to prevent problems it can cause.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The branches were removed only because they hung low and took up valuable yard space - they weren't diseased or infested or anything like that. Does that change things or should I still avoid using it around plants and such? Are there any other uses (useful, decorative or just plain cool) for mulch from a fig tree?
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Seattle, WA | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Ty, use it!
It has been proven that using wood mulch on top of the soil does NOT tie up nitrogen. It only does that when it is worked into the soil!
Using the wood mulch will help enrich your soil over time as it self composts in place!

And I have never had a problem from putting mulch right up to a plant! And I live down here where diseases and insects run rampant! Having good soil will make your plants healthy enough to fight off those diseases or insect infestations!

USE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Big Grin


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Okay, now I'm re-motivated again! What about the fact that's a fig tree? Is it even considered real wood? If so, where does it rank between cedar mulch (highly recommended) and pine mulch (avoid if possible)?
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Seattle, WA | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The wood from a Fig tree is real wood but it is difficult to classify it in relation to other woods since most of the answers you get in a web search come up about mulching Fig trees not using them as mulch.
Some people, because of its inherent rot resistance, seem to think Cedar is the best mulch while Pine is ranked by those as not so good. However, what you can get is what is best since that is what you have. I would suspect that those that say avoid pine for mulch have no clue how Ma Nature works.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8118 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Okay. Can I just layer this mulch on top of soil of unknown quality or must I replace the soil with new top or potting soil first?
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Seattle, WA | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of M-ma
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As for piling up, avoid using more than 3-4". I think that's what's being said here.
People love to pile it on. That causes less moisture to penetrate and it causes roots to come to the surface. Why? They need moisture. You also invite destructive insects into the cozy, dark, dampish piles.
Anything that grows in our yard is shredded and used as mulch. Grass is combined with shredded leaves for compost. Veg. waste goes into ComposTumbler or gravity composter.
Only diseased and rotted is discarded/burned.
 
Posts: 5900 | Location: western PA | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yikes! That's a lot to consider. This is my first dive into gardening and such so I think I'll pass on making mulch until I'm more experienced.

Thanks everyone!
 
Posts: 27 | Location: Seattle, WA | Registered: Apr 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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