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garden bed edging Sign In/Join 
Picture of Crzy Cat Lady
posted
I started edging the flower beds in front of my house. I got half of it done with no problem then I started on the other half, it was going well until I got to the part where the garden plumets straight down to the driveway. I am using concrete edgers that look like a row of 4 tubes but the last one has a cut out for the first on of the next one nests into it. I tried cascading them down but the pitch is so great the top one winds up being unsupported. HELP!!! Thanks in advance.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: SE PA | Registered: Aug 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am not positive of the edging you mare referring to. But I suggest the edgers are too long for the slope and are making the end rise up. You have two options that I can see. You can cut the edgers shorter and either discard the cut part or find another way to join them together. The second option is to change the depth that they are buried from one end to the other. They may look odd or they may not if it is a slope. You would have to try it and then step back and see.
 
Posts: 6771 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Just a thought; is there really a need to use concrete edgers; could you not see using no edgers at all.
Formal lawns use no such edging; they use the method of cutting the edge in a straight-down way....making the edge as clean as possible leaving a depressed edge of the garden that allows for good drainage.
Grass that encroaches is easily kept at bay by use of the string whipper.

The drainage of water onto the driveway can be a problem during those heavy rain-days but.....

heck....life is not a total bowl of cherries.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by Loonie:
Just a thought; is there really a need to use concrete edgers; could you not see using no edgers at all.
Formal lawns use no such edging; they use the method of cutting the edge in a straight-down way....making the edge as clean as possible leaving a depressed edge of the garden that allows for good drainage.
Grass that encroaches is easily kept at bay by use of the string whipper.

The drainage of water onto the driveway can be a problem during those heavy rain-days but.....

Crazy Cat....you might question the reason I suggest 'no edging'....well, the problem you are experiencing might be a good reason to forego such remedy.
The edge of a garden, where it abuts a lawn, can be made to look neat....and if by chance, the garden is in a non-straight line--in other words, has a curve to it, all the better.
Edging the way I suggest will improve the look; more of the garden plants will be seen and better appreciated.

If you have doubts about such a scheme, try it in a small area. Step back and look at the effect and ask yourself whether it looks better with the edging....or without it.

By the way...if the garden is not curved...and you have a chance to make it so....you might try to accomplish that. Curves add appeal...you see more of what's in the garden, with a curved line to the edge.

Mind you...such curving will not allow you to use such edging you have down...that would have to go.
And, if you think you might try it, don't resort to using plastic edging---that's not my idea of improvement.

Try it.....you'll like it!
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You can use a garden hose to mark the best-looking border shape and to make gradual curves. You can also trim the trench a bit here or there as you cut the edge to smooth curves. For straight borders, follow a tightly stretched string line.
 
Posts: 19 | Registered: Mar 15, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Crzy Cat Lady
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Thanks all for the recomendations. I really want to use the blocks, it is not the curses that are the issue it is the slope of the yard straight doen to the driveway. I think I am going to trellis the garden down. i was trying to avoid this since I have plants that have been established for a few years to 1 year already. I am also going to have to get soil to fill in the levels. I am going to use these other blocks to level off the trellises. Thanks all for your help.
Ruth
 
Posts: 2 | Location: SE PA | Registered: Aug 09, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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