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posted
Hello, I placed an order with the Arbor Day foundation for 10 trees. They will ship the trees to my home in southern New Jersey the first week in December. I have never planted trees this late in the season. The Arbor Day foundation suggested to dig a hole 1 foot deep by 1 foot wide prior to December. Should I store the dirt in a warm area before the trees arrive? The trees are very small ( 1 foot tall ) but I am looking forward to planting them and they will be irrigated properly in the spring. Has anyone here have any helpful advice on how to prepare the ground prior to receiving the trees? I know it is an unusual question but I appreciate any help you can give me. Thank You, Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Wow. Interesting they would ship them to your address that late? What zone are you in?

Since you are only getting ten and that small, (If it were me), I might really consider planting them in containers (NO Fertilizer), and waiting till spring to actually put them in the ground. If you have a wind sheltered area with good light, and bank well with mulch and straw to avoid freeze/thaw temperature fluctuations. It would be easier to keep them watered too. Nurseries here keep their larger, unsold tree stock stored this way through the winter, while still in containers or bagged with burlap.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Planting trees in December around here is very common. As Arbor Day Foundation has suggested prepare the planting hole but do not, especially if you have clay soil, amend it with a lot of organic matter. The primary reason for digging the holes now is if, by chance the ground should freeze. Even here that rarely happens.
Rutgers Cooperative Extension Service most likely has ore information for you if you ask.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8184 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you for the helpful suggestions and advice. I really appreciate both opinions. We live in southern New Jersey, Zone # 7. I do not know anyone that has purchased trees from the Arbor Day foundation but with an acre of ground I decided to give it a try. Thanks again! Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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There's no need to protect the soil that you unearth when you dig the hole for your trees.
You don't mention what kind of trees, but no matter, a tree is a tree is a tree.
With deciduous specimens the dropping of the leaves will tell you when dormancy is at hand.
Planting trees in the fall...early winter...the trees are dormant, their need to create new leaves is not happening so it can put emphasis on setting roots.
The hole is dug early in case a freeze occurs that makes it difficult to dig sufficient depth.
The best place for the trees is IN THE GROUND....where the heat of the ground will protect it while setting its roots.
If you wish, you can place into the hole some planting soil if the ground has frozen to any extent.
Do not add anything to encourage growth which might be affected by frost.
You can water the hole before you plant, then water well afterwards and maintain watering as long as the ground will accept it.
So that says make sure you have good drainage.

Protect the youngsters from drying winter winds by either putting up a barrier or wrap them around a cage with burlap.
don't let the burlap touch the soft wood.
A foot tall I guess we could call them "saplings" so they would be open to winter's worst. Once the hard frost has occured, maybe consider putting the young trees under something...such as a bushel basket a picnic hamper or bury them with willow or oak leaves or boughs of evergreens and let a good snow cover do the rest. In the spring, don't uncover until all chance of frost has passed.

I don't know whether treat them like you would a rose bush....bury them completely with soil AFTER the hard frost.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Murphman, as I suggested talk with, and listen to, the people at your local office of the Rutgers CES, people that know what they are talking about.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8184 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Well sure, you can consult an expert at an extension service....or just visit your local full-service nursery...the guy who sells trees...and get good tips.
But...what the heck....planting a tree is not all that difficult; you dig a hole, put the tree in, surround it with the soil, water it, protect it from the elements, and watch it grow.
As long as you don't put it somewhere it shouldn't be ...such as putting a 30-footer, in front of your front door or hiding a window's view, its pretty straight forward.

With so many small trees that is contemplated, just put them where later you can transplant them to their final spot after they have set their roots.

A question Murph; did the Arbor Foundation suggest a larger order. They have this offer...if you order a hundred trees, they'll sell them --practically give them away, for pennies.
Its just their way to get people to plant trees which, of course, aids the environment--***** up bad air, and delivers good air as well as conserves ground water and protects from erosion.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you for your advice. I ordered a total of 10 trees. I have an acre of ground but I can only plant so many due to space. I was more curious to the unusual time of year to plant the trees. I will start preparing in October for the shipment. Thanks again!
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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murphman, just wanted to acknowledge that you are always so kind and considerate to thank any posters who try to answer or help share advice to your questions. It does not go unnoticed.Wink
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you Conrad for the nice words. I appreciate it. I like the suggestions everyone provides. Very helpful. Murphman
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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Murphman, I sure hope you have much better luck with your trees from the Arbor Day Foundation than I have. They had to replace parts of my order twice as what they sent were mear sticks without any root systems.
I agree with Conrad (I think that's who said it) to put them in pots until next spring so that you will be sure that they are going to grow.
Some of what they sent me was really pretty bad!
And if they don't grow...don't hesitate to email them and ask for replacements!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5004 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Containers or no.....they still have to be put into the ground; that's the safest place.
And, in a container, they must drain well. They must also be protected from the elments.
One of the best places for container growing shrubs and trees is amongst the foundation plants.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Loonie:
Containers or no.....they still have to be put into the ground; that's the safest place.
And, in a container, they must drain well. They must also be protected from the elments.
One of the best places for container growing shrubs and trees is amongst the foundation plants.


Well Loonie, considering the pathetic things they sent me, I wasn't about to dig a hole I wouldn't be able to fill with a growing tree! So I put them in pots to make sure they were alive when I got them. About 1/2 the order was NOT viable when I received it...and neither were 2 replacement orders!
Once I had growing plants/trees, THEN I dug holes to plant them in the ground.
I would have had a lot of wasted effort otherwise and I have lots of other things to do with my time.

And on another note...some of us don't have "foundation plants"! I've never liked that look so I only have a couple of things that would be considered "foundation"...at the ends of my porch!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: ga.karen,


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 5004 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If not in pots, you must plant them.
Add leaves to the holes to help keep them from an early freeze (probably not going to happen in your area but...).
Also, not knowing what kind of trees or the size, is protection needed to keep rabbits from munching them off during winter or deer from nipping them?
If container trees, we often put a bush in container in the garden for over winter--did it last year. Planted it in the spring. Just be certain the root ball isn't tight--cut lines down to release the roots and plant container and all.
Your trees will need moisture. As indicated above, water and, dependent upon snow/rain, occasionally water just to keep them moist.

Wind protection needed? Burlap or plastic. Binder clips and stakes. Lowe's carries simple, narrow plant supports in a variety of sizes. Office supply for binder clips.
Three stakes and attach burlap or a garbage bag with the clips---NOT over the tree; just go around the tree at a small distance to keep the cold winds from freezing it--helps to keep animals away, too.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: M-ma,
 
Posts: 5952 | Location: western PA | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nurseries do overwinter many plants in containers buried deeply in mulch so the plants roots do not freeze where temperatures fall below freezing for a long time. I did pot up and hold over the winter those seedlings from Arbor Day Foundation, but they were buried in soil from mid November to early April, and they sent roots out of the pot into the soil.
I have heard many people state they are very disappointed in what they received from Arbor Day Foundation, 10 trees for $10.00, and I really don't know what people expect for that.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8184 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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But, Kimm, for this new homeowner, even a few inexpensive trees that do make it is a good start.

Myself, I'd plant them in a cluster in a protected area just for winter. A foot apart. I'd mulch them good with leaves, preferably shredded with a mower. If needed, I'd put up some kind of wind protection. Keep them moist--water a bit every week for 6-8 wks. if possible.
Come spring, plant where I want them.
 
Posts: 5952 | Location: western PA | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That also sounds like a good plan M-ma. Mulch and protect the tree from winter winds and chewing rodents as much as possible. Your Zone 7 is a much warmer average climate than our 4 and 5. What type of tree cultivar is it???

It actually is not the fact that the roots freeze in cold weather that will often kill the small tree...it is the freeze, warm/thaw/refreeze that causes heaving and damage to the trees. Plus the drying out of the plant.

It is why we also cover rose bushes with shredded leaf mulch, to avoid the sudden changes in temperature. The roots can and do freeze. One just does not want them to come out of dormancy before true spring weather has arrived.

Hope you have good luck with your 10 little trees, and if not, replacements in the spring.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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https://ag.purdue.edu/hla/Docu...LN%2069%202%2032.pdf


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8184 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of M-ma
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I'm zone 4.5; right in between.
Mulch helps keep the soil from heaving by keeping the temp more even.
We shred our leaves and put them around the foundation for heave protection.
 
Posts: 5952 | Location: western PA | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Sorry M-ma, if I was not clear in my post.

I actually meant and referred to Murphman whom stated was in zone 7, and wondered what type of trees were actually ordered?

Off topic, but to add:
So many times there are also micro climates in areas (whatever the zone), where there are wind breaks, sheltered spots, areas with lots of reflected winter sun exposure as well areas close to a foundation that receive some ambient heat from structures like warm basements. Amazing what can survive for many years, until a very unusually cold winter takes it's toll.
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No harm done.

You're right, of course. Many factors weigh in.

A really frigid spell.
An early, heavy wet snow.
Too many warm days.

Everything is a factor.

I think 10 trees for $10 is a decent start. If five survive, good. If planted in a group, a couple of feet apart probably better, I'd let them go for a year and a half at least.
 
Posts: 5952 | Location: western PA | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you very much everyone for your helpful suggestions! I appreciate it. I enjoy reading everyone's information and advice. Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Please folks, we're not talking trees here....at the most we're speaking of 'saplings'....hardly something that can be put into a pot of size that would ever stand up to zone 4 winter.

Murphman....take your 10 saplings, bundle them together and plant them as best you can in an area that gives utmost protection.
One of the best places is next to the foundation wall...amongst your foundation plants....(if you have them).
Pots....with their little water provision, would freeze their as**s off when the temperatures go anywhere near 30°F....but, in the ground, they have all the protection that medium can give and if put where wind is not a factor, you can rely on them being as safe as if they were in the w**b.

About the bundling....even a sapling has an up....and a down....make sure when you bundle together the ups are with their brethren and tape them so they can planted as if one....and retrieved in the spring and be planted in their chosen place.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I believe the tree people call any "tree" with no side branches and trunk/main stem less than 1.5 inches in diameter a "Whip". Wink

They are sold very cheaply, as they really don't expect a good percentage to survive the first few years.

However, most here are hoping you have really good luck with these murphman!
 
Posts: 9663 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Conrad, as you point out, specimens such as the ones purchased, might well not survive in numbers.
This reminds me of why I hate reducing the numbers of seedlings I bring along; I hate picking out the number that might well be the better examples so that others might have more room to grow and less competition.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thank you very much to every one for your responses and opinions. I appreciate your helpful suggestions. Looking forward to seeing how the trees perform. Thanks again! Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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