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posted
I have a small front yard in desperate need of a facelift! I'm in the house for 2 years and haven't done too much to the outside because I have no idea what I'm doing. What are some nice shrubbery and flowers to put outside a bay window? I would like some to stay green throughout winter. Thanks!
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Aug 23, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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It would help a whole lot to know your general location as what I grow down here in Ga. may not grow up in NY.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Green all year. That speaks for evergreens.
As long as you buy locally grown, locally nurtured plants they will survive your local conditions.
There are, of course, different shapes, different sizes and different habits of these plants so decide beforehand what it is you want to accomplish from the plant then decide on what kind suits best.

Some are stiff needled, others are soft. There are colors too---usually blue to green and shades in-between.
Some grow wide and make for great hedges. Others grow high and make a statement in front of the entrance.
For a bay window I suggest a low growing cedar or yew that need little maintenance and enhances the place under the window.
Annual flowers can be planted in front to highlight the evergreen.

Do yourself a favor and scan magazines, and nursery stock pamphlets before laying out money.

Its getting late in the season now. Evergreens can still be planted to attain root development.
But because nurseries do not like to carry stock through winter, they often put plnats "on sale". These can be plants they couldn't sell during the spring/summer and should be looked at carefully for damage or bad root growth.
Price can be a deciding factor but if you buy in season, you are assured more of quality.
Then again, quantity of plants can be bought at wholesale prices at end of season.
So if you decide on planting a hedge, these can be a bargain. Shop carefully.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Loonie,
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most nurseries don't have "locally grown" plants. They all come from growers. The plants available in my area at nurseries come from either South Carolina or Fl. My conditions are completely different from both of those!


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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"Locally grown" means plants that are grown in the climate suited to them. If a person is wanting to plant in Florida, the plant should be so nurtured in the state or in the south part of the country that mirrors Florida's environment.

The old adage works....every time.
You can take the girl out of the country....but you cant take the country out of the girl.

Plants will not survive when removed from their natural environment. An annual planted in Miami should be grown in the southern part of the country; definitely not come in from the north.

A plant that is expected to survive Florida's heat should be "locally" grown to not die the first time the temperature hits 90º.

If a nursery does business with a supplier whose stock comes from, or grows stock, in the Carolinas, then it had better be such plants that can take Florida's environment if they ship to that state. Othrwise they are just handing off problems to the unknowing customer.

Now...without starting an argument...
would a Californian admit that an orange grown in that state could do just as well grown in Florida.

Would a grape grown in Upstate New York do as well grown in California.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Plants will not survive when removed from their natural environment. An annual planted in Miami should be grown in the southern part of the country; definitely not come in from the north.


Not true at all! Many, many plants adapt to new environments. I have hostas that came from Mo., iris from Indiana & Oregon, lilies from several states including Co., roses from Ill. and some other plants from Oregon.
Nurseries buy from what ever suppliers are available to them.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4323 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While some plants adapt well, I like to purchase plants, trees and shrubs that are grown in my area. Annuals aren't a problem but perennials, trees and shrubs that are shipped in sometimes do not adapt well. One good example is a Florida grown daylily simply won't do as well in Ohio as it does down there and vice versa. Yes, it may grow but it won't look the same as it does down there. I would be very careful with trees and shrubs grown in a much different climate. I do buy some but I really prefer locally grown stuff.
 
Posts: 3048 | Location: Ohio | Registered: Feb 25, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fragrant abelia is a great option for your garden. Have a look:
 
Posts: 19 | Registered: Mar 15, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Loonie
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Karen, if you're going to ignore what the geographical zones that are printed out by the United States Agriculture Department then you have no come-back at any nursery who sells you something...and it dies the first seasons.

Plant ARE grown according to their environment.
And I might add, the Stare of Florida is very conscious of what plants come into the state.

I repeat.....plants should mirror where they are grown and according to their hardiness zone.
If you prefer to take chances on the plants you buy from an unknown source....then you are throwing the dice.

Some plants, notably trees, that are removed from their wild growing area, can, years later, show up with all kinds of problems.
Dig an evergreen tree for a XMAS tree, it might do well sitting in your living room, but it might also leave behind dangerous diseases to your other plants that have no protection against it/them.
 
Posts: 458 | Registered: Mar 22, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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