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posted
Hello, We live in southern New Jersey and every year at this time due to the hot and humid weather we get crab grass throughout our yard. The yard will look great March through the middle of July than almost overnight we get crabgrass. I applied Scott Turf builder with crabgrass control back in May but it seems nothing works. Another issue is browning of grass due to insects. Is there anything I can do or put down on the grass to help it grow back again? If you have a solution I would be very thankful. Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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This worked for us in south east NEB:

The crabgrass (pre emergent prevention)often needs two applications in the growing season. If you have a lot of it, there are many seeds to deal with, and it won't be over in a year or two of applications. It probably took a good 6 or 7 years to get rid of it for us.

We used to have to apply in early May before the soil heated up enough to germinate the seeds (time varied a bit year to year), and a second application in mid to late June or so depending on when the spring application was. (It gradually stops working) By the way, this also can help keep spurge from germinating mid summer. It needs to be watered well after applying also.

Aeration or digging plus edging along sidewalks can bring seeds to the surface with disturbed soil (and they can still germinate), so try to do these chores before a pre-emergent application or in the fall?

There is a post emergent weed killer that can kill off young crabgrass plants (before they can go to seed), but it can damage weak turf grass also.

After ridding most of it, a healthy, thick turf can keep a lot of it under control too. Your local county agricultural agency may help you out with more local information.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: conrad,
 
Posts: 9428 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Improving the soil, keeping the grass longer and a couple of doses of pre-emergent crabgrass preventer. However, I have the same problem every year about this time, mainly because I refuse to waste drinking water on grass. I've used a hose end spray to kill it off, but once it starts sending out runners that stuff just slows it down, it doesn't kill it.


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Posts: 6856 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you very much for the helpful advice. I really appreciate it. Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Crabgrass is an annual grass and the seeds need certain soil temperatures and moisture levels to germinate. Turf grass properly feed and watered so it grows nice and thick can help reduce the amount of any "weed" that might grow in the lawn. To get a nice thick turf the soil needs to be good and healthy and synthetic plant foods will not get the grass there.
Insects are a bigger problem in lawns that are fed with synthetics, so getting off those drugs and working on making the soil the grass grows in into a good healthy soil will do a lot to help with lawn insects as well.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8112 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you for the suggestion and helpful advice! Murph
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: Dec 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by murphman:
I applied Scott Turf builder with crabgrass control back in May but it seems nothing works.


Pre-emergent crabgrass control products are only effective for about 60 days so the timeline sounds about right. You apply in mid-May and in mid-July you get crabgrass. Next year try applying a second time 60 days after the first application.

You might also be a bit late on your first application. You should be applying any pre-emergent products at about the time you mow your lawn for the 2nd time of the year. That way it allows the desirable turf grasses to start growing but blocks the undesirables. If you wait until the undesirables have begin to emerge the product you are applying will have zero effect on them.
 
Posts: 46 | Location: United States | Registered: Apr 27, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The manufacturers directions for Turf Builder plus Halts Crabgrass control say to apply it in early spring, from February to April. Always read, and follow, the manufacturers directions for use of their product for best results.


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8112 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Timing application depends on the seasonal temperature where you live. This may vary a bit from year to year.
In our zone, the first application of pre-emergent is timed to the initial dropping of forsythia bush flower blooms. (They seem to be tied to the temperature changes in the spring, and this has always worked for us) The second application is timed a certain number of weeks after the first. Check the product bag for timing, as mentioned above.
Both applications must be thoroughly watered in to get the product to coat the soil level. We try to time it before rain is expected or else plan to water it in well with the sprinklers.

Too early an application, and it still breaks down at a normal rate and may not be effective for as long as needed (waste product/money), too late, and the seeds have already sprouted.

Your local nursery or county agricultural agent can also be a help to time the applications to your zone and yearly conditions.
 
Posts: 9428 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Improve the soil by mulching your clippings and leaving them on the lawn. Pull the weed plants out before the seeds get distributed for next year and plant grass seed in the holes.
To protect birds and ground water (and people), Spring and Fall spread corn gluten (not chemical pre-emergent) to prevent sprouting of new seeds. Crabgrass dies off in the cold and only grows again from seeds. If you do spread corn gluten or any pre-emergent product you cannot seed at the same time, the product will prevent the grass seed from sprouting as well.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: Aug 28, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Believe me when I say this.I feel your pain.I HATE crabgrass.Its so freakin messy when you mow it,it grows way to fast, Its clogs up your mower which adds extra wear on your mower and it thrives on the days where its so miserable outside which adds wear and tear on us lol.

Well after dealing with crabgrass for the last 5 years I started 3 weeks ago pulling it from my yard.You talking about feeling overwhelmed lol.Its gone dormant and is a little easier to pull now.Its been going smoothly but makes the back sore.I can say that ive pulled about 8 5 gallons full of it which is pretty close to half of it.Hopefully the bermuda will be happy in may when they realize they have the yard to thier selves again Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: UGA Dawgs,


 
Posts: 251 | Location: North Georgia | Registered: Jul 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by ally13:
Crabgrass dies off in the cold and only grows again from seeds. If you do spread corn gluten or any pre-emergent product you cannot seed at the same time, the product will prevent the grass seed from sprouting as well.


AFter dealing with crabgrass and pulling tons of it the last 3 weeks I am beginning to think it comes back from dormancy.What I mean is all these plants I am pulling right now are currently dormant.They will be back green in may if I didnt pull them.

That probaly explains all the money I wasted on these so called pre emergent fertilizers



1

This message has been edited. Last edited by: UGA Dawgs,


 
Posts: 251 | Location: North Georgia | Registered: Jul 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of ga.karen
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UGA, I don't think we always get cold enough to completely kill it.
I was pulling some last week and it had new growth on it plus there was new stuff coming up from dropped seeds.


"The soil is the source of life, creativity, culture and real independence." David Ben-Gurion
 
Posts: 4305 | Location: SW Ga. 8b | Registered: Apr 21, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Very often other weedy grass species are mistakenly identified as Crabgrass, and some of what is described here sounds like it has been.
Crabgrass is an annual and will not regrow from old plants. If a plant appears to go dormant and then grows again it is not crabgrass. Crabgrass grows prostrate and seldom will it be of any height to be picked up by a mower unless it is scruffed up just prior to mowing.
https://www.google.com/search?...sAQ&biw=1920&bih=946


The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.
 
Posts: 8112 | Location: Twin Lake, MI USA | Registered: Aug 19, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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