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  Boring yet crazy front, need advice
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Boring yet crazy front, need advice Sign In/Join 
posted
We are currently renovating our "mid century modern" home and have successfully completed a kitchen and master bath remodel. We've also completely torn out the stone face on our fireplace and changed it to a traditional wood and tile mantle and surround. The inside is beautiful but as you can see by the picture (hopefully it comes through), the front is in serious need of a change. The front living room wall has no window and we don't want to add one as it faces on a busy street but the grey brick exterior is very boring looking with nothing there. We've even thought about adding a faux window on the exterior to break it up. We also need to cover up the lower part of the fireplace. We would prefer to cover up the whole fireplace stack but don't want to spend the money. Any ideas or suggestions would be much appreciated!

Front of house
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: Jun 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Certainly odd looking flue. To begin with that should have went all the way to the ground. That particular faux stone does not compliment the house. If you like grey there is several different types of faux stone in colors that would fit better.

Possibly doing the stack ledge or dry stack greyish stone on the bottom portion and to the left up to the eve and then the flue (after rebuilt) the same way. It would looked balanced on each end. Then do something different for in inset portion.
 
Posts: 725 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 13, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Yep, I sure would think about making all that fireplace stone tend to disappear/blend in, with some matching (or slightly darker), gray concrete stain? A large planter made of pressure treated 2 x wood could possibly fill the space below for one more idea.

I think your faux window idea could work well too. Find a couple discarded storm windows with decent wood frames, and spray paint the glass black from the back side and screw to the mortar of the brick?
 
Posts: 9459 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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The fireplace is certainly funky looking, the stone shouldn't be hanging in mid-air.

Instead of a fake window, why not some sort of art object? I'd build some sort of base around the fire place and as much as I hate painted brick and stone I'd paint it a complementary color to the house. If you keep the gray go several shades darker than the body of the house on the stone and the base.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6870 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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all good advice, we have also wondered what they were thinking when they stopped the rock midway down. I only wish it was faux rock though, our fireplace inside had the same rock and unfortunately we learned that it was six inch thick genuine stone as we begin to take it all off inside. What a huge job that was. Probably the easiest and least expensive fix is a raised planter. I'd really like to use a stacked faux slate type brick stone (if that makes sense) for the planter but I know it won't go with the big hideous white rock. That crazy rock wraps all down one side of our entry also. I've tried to figure out if we could cover over it with new updated faux stacking stone because we just don't have the energy to remove all that rock.
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: Jun 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is the stone on the outside the same as the inside? I had my doubts that it being suspended the way it is that it was real stone. Real stone of that amount would generally require a footing and support to the ground. If it is stone and is secure to the substrait you could parge over it and lay faux stone to it without removing it.
 
Posts: 725 | Location: Applachain | Registered: Feb 13, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would suspect it is just a thin veneer as well. A cantilevered solid stone structure like that would require some major structural steel and some significant weight on top of the steel inside the house. Somebody went to a lot of trouble to make something so ugly. Sorry OP, few architects really mastered "mid-century modern" and many of their designs were quickly dated. A good contemporary design still looks good, but unfortunately most weren't good designs.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6870 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It's the same stone as inside, 5-6 inches thick! I added a couple more pictures


quote:
Originally posted by redoverfarm:
Is the stone on the outside the same as the inside? I had my doubts that it being suspended the way it is that it was real stone. Real stone of that amount would generally require a footing and support to the ground. If it is stone and is secure to the substrait you could parge over it and lay faux stone to it without removing it.


Rock
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: Jun 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pic

 
Posts: 4 | Registered: Jun 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Karen, what is the dark line feature under the fireplace on the left side of the first image? Besides a planter box...Could a simple water fountain feature be placed there? I can't imagine why that blank space was left undone. Unless a plant had been there but couldn't remain due to confinement. ????? Let us know how it turns out.
 
Posts: 5073 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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How about a large frosted or ribbed glass window or row of three windows? It would add to the architectural detail lacking on the exterior and allow light to filter inside while concealing the unappealing view. I agree that the chimney should continue to the ground. If you wish to add interest to the blank portion of the face of the house another option could involve creative vertical shrubbery perhaps climbing lattice or other type of trellis. Here's a link illustrating contemporary frosted windows.



http://www.houzz.com/photos/ex...frosted-glass-window
 
Posts: 18471 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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