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in-ground pool Sign In/Join 
posted
We have an in-ground pool, both pumps are broken and it needs a new liner. We are considering getting rid of it. If we fill it in, I was told we would have to sign a disclosure when selling our property, which would bring down the value. We are considering decking over the top of the pool.....or using the pool as a root celler, would appreciate any info on how best to be done with this monster!
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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For use as a root/storage cellar (or a tornado shelter if needed), you basically already may have a foundation, floor and support walls existing. Only thing you need is a roof system that will shed water off and away from the edges, and one could easily add a deck over that roof.
I would talk to a local builder or check with your building permit offices if you want to DIY. Local laws and codes will vary (you may need to beef-up what exists)...so this research really needs to be done locally.
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the information, we have discussed many options and are just trying to find the most practical way to be done with it! Pools are great, but very costly, so now that the kids are gone it never gets used and I divorced the pool BOY!
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A good friend had an in ground pool when her kids were at home, and they enjoyed it a lot. Same situation as you, when the kids were gone, the pool developed a leak and was not worth the repair or upkeep to them. They had someone come out and break up the bottom with a jack hammer, and break down the sides 3 feet below ground level and then fill/level soil to the ground area. They lived on an acreage, and I don't recall any note of disclosure being discussed. Maybe it depends on how you dismantle? And of course local laws of disclosure.

I would check again with local statutes on what steps would be required to not needing to disclose?
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Conrad! I saw on an HGTV show about the disclosure, because future owners may want to dig where the pool is located! We have 4' walk all around the pool and thought keeping it would give us good foundation for the deck. Thought about filling it in with top soil and planting the garden in it, but we have a big garden! Also thought about putting fish in it for the grandkids to fish in, but we have a large pond! We have 26 acres and this pool is right in the back yard and fenced! Probably just going to jackhammer the main drain, which is clogged, for drainage and deck the top. Maybe a gazebo and an out door kitchen! Amazing how something so simple can be such a pain! Haven't check with the locals yet re: permits and regulations. Should probably start there!
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If it has a liner I assume it isn't a concrete pool.

You'll need to properly backfill the hole. You can't just back a dump-truck up to the hole and dump in a load of fill smooth it out and plant grass. You put in about six inches and compact, six more inches, compact. Do this until it is full. I can't imagine it would hurt your value by anything if done properly. You would want to tell them it was there because it will impact how they build a foundation for a new deck or addition to the house.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6996 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Sparky! Yes it has a liner and the walls are fiberglass with stucko over it. Also has steel arm braces. The problem with filling it in is the 4' walk way all the way around it, with landscaping areas (3) within it. Don't get me wrong it is a beautiful lay out, just don't want the pool ! We drained it just to see what the walls would do. It is holding some water, due to the drain being clogged in the bottom and the liner is starting to sag. No issues with the structure! It is a 20' x 40' 8'deep to 3'deep free style design, not your typical rectangle or oval shape. Just don't know about the weight of the deck, on the concrete and over the pool, if there would be a structure failure! ??????
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If it were me in this case, I would just remove as much of the side walls as possible, make sure the bottom is broken out many places for drainage and plan on having it filled in. Then there should be no issue with either landscaping or decking in the area.
Good luck with what you decide!
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You'd want to fill it in even if you were going to build a deck over the hole.

As long as the deck isn't attached to the house it could actually be a "floating" deck using deck blocks on top of the concrete around the pool. Though you'd have to check on the span over the pool where you wouldn't have a firm foundation.

I've heard that typical pool ownership is about 5 or 6 years. People sell the house or fill in the pool after that because the kids are off to college and the parents don't want to maintain it. We have a neighborhood pool and one person in the subdivision put in a pool. They owned the house for a couple of years after they built the pool and sold the house.

That figure is probably not typical for Florida or Texas, places you can use the pool for 9 to 12 months of the year. Here without heating it, you can use a pool for about 5 May - Sept.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6996 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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breaking out the top 2' sounds about right,,, backfill w/granular material & compact in lifts just like conrad said,,, we drill holes/break up the bottom not so it drains but so the pool won't float up OUT OF THE GROUND,,, IF the water table gets high, there's a boat hull in your yard & you'll see it,,, depending on cost of fill & trucking, you should be able to budget $5K & have some leftover for bar-b-q

This message has been edited. Last edited by: itsreallyconc,


if you hear it from an apron/vest store guy, be VERY skeptical
 
Posts: 265 | Location: atlanta | Registered: Jul 19, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the info...the pool has a fiberglass wall and stucko over it. Behind the walls are steel arms about three feet, holding back the sides and back filled with gravel. Do we still need to drill? I do not believe that it would float, considering it is not one piece and anchored with a 4' walk way all around it. The pool was professionally installed about 12 years ago. It is a 20' x 40' - 8'deep to a 3' free form style. Hate to waste the 8' depth ( root seller or a shelter ) But more costly! Really don't want to fill it with dirt. Thanks for anybody's help. FREE POOL TO A GOOD HOME !
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I e-mailed the pool co., that put the pool in. How to remove ? I will Let you know what they recommend. Thanks for the info., from all of you. Our region is KY, it did have a gas heater and we used it about 6 mos. out of the year.
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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no cruise ship i know is held down by the deck chairs ;-) pools do float - even conc/gunite pools,,, that's 1 reason they're not emptied for long periods of time,,, local laws may REQUIRE you to fill it,,, a prudent owner would check, no ?

you could always make a bomb shelter out of it

This message has been edited. Last edited by: itsreallyconc,


if you hear it from an apron/vest store guy, be VERY skeptical
 
Posts: 265 | Location: atlanta | Registered: Jul 19, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do understand that, do you install pools? Will it decrease my home value if I fill it? Or will it help if we remove it completely? Don't plan on selling anytime soon, just want to enjoy the backyard without worry of the lillability.
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I doubt it will lower your home value. For many people the pool lowers the value because like you they don't want the liability or the maintenance issues with a pool.

So by eliminating the pool you're increasing the depth of the pool of potential buyers of your house.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6996 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks Sparky, so if I take it out completely is the best, in the long run? Or to fill it?
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the info...the pool has a fiberglass wall and stucko over it. Behind the walls are steel arms about three feet, holding back the sides and back filled with gravel. Do we still need to drill? I do not believe that it would float, considering it is not one piece and anchored with a 4' walk way all around it. The pool was professionally installed about 12 years ago. It is a 20' x 40' - 8'deep to a 3' free form style. Hate to waste the 8' depth ( root seller or a shelter ) But more costly! Really don't want to fill it with dirt. Thanks for anybody's help. FREE POOL TO A GOOD HOME !
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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f/g is easily cut w/sawzall & the bracing arms can also be cut,,, i would drill but its your pool - think of your pool as a ship's hull - they float

the conc walk isn't an anchor when buoyancy is the issue,,, survival room's a thought,,, would certainly reduce the amt of fill dirt you'd need


if you hear it from an apron/vest store guy, be VERY skeptical
 
Posts: 265 | Location: atlanta | Registered: Jul 19, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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I read once about someone purchasing and burying a new fiberglass? enclosed tank. Perhaps made for septic? Cut a door opening in the upper side for access, (created the hinged door from metal strapping and the cut piece of tank) Also vented it for both fresh air and wired for a light (up through the soil). This doubled as a tornado shelter and root/storage shelter. Water proof, not very costly and could take up a good portion of the fill soil issue.

Add a small fridge, recliner and a flatcreen with cable, instant MAN CAVE Wink
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Without significant weight in that tank it would float up with the ground water. Try holding an upside down canoe under water and see how you do. The Mythbusters did it as an experiment a few years ago after the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie came out where Jack Sparrow and the other guy used an upside down canoe to walk out to the ship under water. They couldn't get the canoe under water with an air bubble in it.

A concrete septic tank used as a cistern would be a better bet to stay in the ground.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6996 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Might it also depend on how much ground water you have in your area's soil? We can dig down 15 feet, after the first 2-3 feet, you tend to reach a gumbo type of clay. Could be wrong but cannot imagine anything floating up in that?

But then again, you could always get a BIGGER refrigerator loaded with beer, heavy "old school" tube TV, and a bigger recliner, to help ballast the weight a bit. Wink
 
Posts: 9681 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Sparky
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Never underestimate the power of water. I suspect even with your clay, which tends to be expansive the tank would pop out of the ground if the water table got high enough.


General Disclaimer

Any advice given here is general in nature and is not necessarily valid for your given area. If in doubt check with your local codes enforcement department for what is required when doing electrical, plumbing or structural work on your house. Permits may or may not be required in your area and home owners may not be able to DIY some tasks. I have no way of knowing if you have the skills needed to complete the tasks you are asking about, when in doubt seek professional assistance.

I am not an employee of HGTV, nor is anyone else that posts here.

My advice may be worth exactly what you pay me for it. :-) For the record I did not stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night.

 
Posts: 6996 | Location: Cary, North Carolina | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for all of your reply's. I have a feeling it's gonna cost as much to remove the pool as it did to put it in! I do know that when the pool was dug they hit rock and had to jackhammer to get to the 8' depth. We are in Kentucky if that makes any difference. Probably should ask a real estate agent what their opinion would be on this as far as re-sale. don't want to make a wrong decision! It kinda like having a dead horse buried in your back yard! haha.
 
Posts: 10 | Location: United States | Registered: Jan 15, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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good idea - might also ck w/local controlling authorities as previously suggested


if you hear it from an apron/vest store guy, be VERY skeptical
 
Posts: 265 | Location: atlanta | Registered: Jul 19, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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