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painting brass shower frame Sign In/Join 
Picture of rubyruby
posted
So, I'm searching for products and ideas and stumbled on this: http://www.addicted2decorating...room-the-reveal.html

This gal painted her shower frame oilrubbed bronze. Has anyone done this? She did not explain what type of paint she used or technique. The master bath in the house we are purchasing has this eyesore. I would love to do this technique an a shoestring budget. Anyone attempted this? Would love feedback. This will be on my must do list! Smile


"In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt"
 
Posts: 1174 | Location: Houston, Tx Zone 9 | Registered: Jul 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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I did a search on the topic and found several sites addressing this topic.mThis is one...

http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/...-shower-stall-36089/
 
Posts: 18693 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rubyruby
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ha! i found the tutorial on You tube! wow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehcG6GS6nyk

http://www.addicted2decorating...hower-enclosure.html

Saving this here so I won't lose it. Labor of Love! But I'll check into just replacing the frame. See how valuable my time will be Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: rubyruby,


"In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt"
 
Posts: 1174 | Location: Houston, Tx Zone 9 | Registered: Jul 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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rubyruby, I have two of those (brass-toned shower enclosures on tubs), and had also seen someone somewhere who had painted them. Although I haven't gone to the links posted, I could tell just by thinking about it that it would be very labor intensive. I think that basically they would have to be removed, taken apart, painted, and re-installed. I decided I'm not going to do that...for my own purposes I have just hidden them behind fabric shower curtains. However, in the next year or so we may be putting our house up for sale, and I am curious as to whether I should leave them alone (although I know they will be a huge turn-off for buyers), or remove them, which will leave a couple of holes in the tile. If I removed them, I would try to patch the holes as much as possible, but still it wouldn't be ideal. Any input on that?
 
Posts: 4081 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of rubyruby
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i don't know Nitalynn....we are buying a house with outdated features at full asking price and the appliances are probably original to the house. No granite either. some people can see past the gold, some people cant. I am going to do as much updating of light fixtures and so forth on a budget. I will take on the shower frame painting. I am not working right now, and wont be working until I get our new home set up. I'll probably take off from working 6 months to a year.


"In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt"
 
Posts: 1174 | Location: Houston, Tx Zone 9 | Registered: Jul 13, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I guess it just depends on the market. When we get closer, I will consult with a realtor about it.

Good luck on your projects, and be sure to show us pictures!
 
Posts: 4081 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Labor intensive and not durable at all. One of the links mentioned painting a faucet. Bad idea! Water and cleansers will peel the finish right off.
 
Posts: 804 | Registered: Jul 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Glad to hear you're making progress with your move-in and decorating, Ruby. Yes, that's a big job!

Nitalynn, for staging/updating purposes, it isn't the first project I recommend to sellers. You might want to take a few other factors into consideration, e.g. the market in your area when you're preparing to list, the strength of your competition and any other negative factors affecting your sale, e.g. bad location or proximity to commercial buildings, etc. If those situations exist, you may wish to have your home in pristine condition.

BTW, if your shower doors are also dated, you might consider replacing the entire unit as part of a minor bathroom update.

Good Luck!
 
Posts: 487 | Registered: Dec 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of aychihuahua
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quote:
Originally posted by Cavin:
Labor intensive and not durable at all. One of the links mentioned painting a faucet. Bad idea! Water and cleansers will peel the finish right off.


My thoughts exactly. I just bought a resale house with the dreaded brass framed shower enclosure and the last thing I would do is repaint it. Replace it perhaps, but no DIY for me.

I watched the video and as soon as I saw the hazmat-type ventilator mask, I said fuggehdaboudit. Too dangerous and too much effort for meh results. (If you read her blog, she disavows any knowledge of how well her efforts have held up. Remember, she repainted her friend's bath, not her own.)

Eventually, we plan to do a minor budget-wise updating of the bath. I will embrace the brassy brassiness of my shower enclosure and pray that polished brass comes back into vogue soon.
 
Posts: 5293 | Registered: Jul 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Put yourself in a buyers position. Would you want to purchase a home where they had painted metal trim and fixtures? I would be very upset to find the finish flaking off on what I presumed to be a factory finish.
 
Posts: 516 | Registered: Mar 04, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of cocok
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I am going to agree with those who say to leave the finish alone. Painting is a temporary quick fix, that will not be durable at all.

And I would not assume that brass is deplorable. Many people, me included, find brass just as valid as any other metal finish.
 
Posts: 7188 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know this is not my thread, but I want to thank those who are giving input to me as well as to rubyruby.

AguaBella - thanks for your input. I will definitely consider all the aspects.

Cocok - I totally agree with you, and your second paragraph. In fact, I am seeing brass and gold paint coming back. However, the "brass" enclosures that I have are the type that do the word brass a major disservice...cheapest looking "brass" finish imaginable. And I actually chose it (sight unseen) which is a long story, and for me to choose anything for my home sight unseen is unimaginable, but I was under pressure at the time. I consider it the biggest decorating mistake I have ever made.
 
Posts: 4081 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of aychihuahua
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quote:
Originally posted by Nitalynn:
However, the "brass" enclosures that I have are the type that do the word brass a major disservice...cheapest looking "brass" finish imaginable.


IKWYM, Nita -- I've got the same exact one in my home. I, too, love brass finishes, just not that kind.
 
Posts: 5293 | Registered: Jul 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Froo Froo
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Although our shower doors were not brass framed we removed them due to the hassle of cleaning the track. We use an extra long vinyl curtain and the holes remain in the tile. Since our bathroom will be gutted soon, we lived with the holes. I believe you can remove the row of tile that includes the punctured ones and create a vertical
Border effect for minimal labor and materials and then replace the removed door with a pretty curtain.

I would not advise you try to paint over the brass either as this is a wet and well used area. The link I provided earlier suggested possible durable techniques, but I don't know if you read them.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Froo Froo,
 
Posts: 18693 | Location: Right here, duh! ;) | Registered: Nov 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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If you remove the shower doors, it is pretty easy to fill those screw holes in tile so they are nearly invisible.

I mixed up some two part CLEAR epoxy, once I had a small amount of artist OIL paints mixed to the closest color match to the tile. (If you are not good at this, get an artist friend to help?)
Add some of the color matched oil paint to the fresh mixed epoxy, and over fill the screw holes slightly. Once the epoxy is mostly cured, take a new single blade razor and holding it flat, trim off any that is "proud/raised" of the hole. Done!
 
Posts: 9616 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of sjf
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does anyone remember what Martha did to her brass fixtures? (light plate covers)she treated them with something that took the protection off so the brass would age and have a patina...now I know that can't happen on the shower as those aren't "real brass"...but if you have a vintage home??
 
Posts: 8538 | Location: se mi | Registered: Sep 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you, Conrad!
 
Posts: 4081 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: Dec 18, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Nitalynn, This technique has worked great for several homes of friends too with just the right amount of surface gloss, from the epoxy. I do recall starting out with Titanium white tube oil paint and adding tiny amounts of other colors to get a perfect match. Nice thing about oils, is the color stays true even after it dries...not so with acrylics (which tend to change slightly).
 
Posts: 9616 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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