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posted
In keeping with Annett's thread re: worst decorating trends, here is a look at what designers are discussing re: current bad trends. I make no claim to agree or disagree, I just find the topic interesting.



"The January/February issue of Elle Decor asked a handful of designers to discuss which trends they would like to see dead and buried. Some of their responses may surprise you.

Books as Props
Ronda Carman, of All the Best Blog. loves books but believes that the use of "books as props have a short shelf life." "Rose Tarlow put it best: 'An object added for effect instead of affection will always look like an affectation.'"

Midcentury Modernism Overload
Antiques dealer Richard Shapiro bemoans the "monotony of one midcentury room after another, all with predictable, gratuitous, gimmicky accessories." He urges decorators to embrace a more eclectic approach and draw from multiple styles and time periods.

Hollywood Regency
Decorator Mary McDonald is ready to say good riddance to brightly colored lacquered Hollywood Regency pieces: "I think we all have seen enough garage-sale junk sprayed in high-gloss Skittles colors to last through the next century."

Dysfunctional Decoration
According to designer Mario Buatta, "dysfunctional decoration" is when interiors are overstylized and don't relate to people. "Everything is done for styling, and nothing has to do with living-- there's no place to have a conversation or set down a drink," he says. "The best time to look at a room is the day after you've had a party because you see the way people used the space."

DIY Mania
Decorator Sheila Bridges is weary of the DIY craze, She says she is tired of the abundance of "earthy, handmade concoctions. Just because it can be reclaimed doesn't mean it should be."

Of course, often it is not the specific style or design or trend itself that is being rejected; it is its overuse, misuse or poorly executed use that gets designers' goats. (Think granite counters or suzanis or poufs: I genuinely love them all but I do get a bit sick of seeing them in every single magazine!). You can have too much of a good thing."
 
Posts: 783 | Registered: Jul 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is a GREAT thread! I am going to think about my reply and come back to post!!!
 
Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"Everything is done for styling, and nothing has to do with living"

So interesting. I was watching an episode of Love it or List it while waiting for my ride to go out for Easter dinner. It never fails to amaze me that there is no money in the budget to fix the leaking shower that causes mold in the bathroom but the kitchen has to have granite countertops and there's enough money in the budget for new furniture with a custom made dining table.

So here I am with my 1950's bathrooms, they may not be your style but no one will ever accuse me of being "cookie cutter!"
 
Posts: 1922 | Location: Northern New Jersey | Registered: Mar 23, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The first thing that comes to mind as a worst decorating trend is using drop cloths for upholstery. Honestly, drop cloths are horrible fabric. They are stiff, poor quality, loosely woven, pieces of fabric, that are absolutely not suitable for upholstery, even if they look vaguely, if you have a good imagination, like linen.

As far as the Elle article:
I like books in a room if you are a reader.

Midcentury Modern and Regency are historic style periods. They aren't going to disappear.

Dysfunctional Decorating, or decorating done only for show, is plain old bad design.

DIY is fun, it's green, and it is economical. I don't think it is a trend at all.
 
Posts: 7075 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like books for lifts, so but I don't think the Decorating Police are showing up at my house any time soon.

I find that decorating w/ things that have meaning to me I don't get tired of.

I understand the granite thing. But, it's knowing why - for me, granite is too busy and i'd tire of it quickly. I need something not shiny and simpler in design. I save my pattern for cheaper things - paint, window treatments, etc.


~~~becca~~~~


 
Posts: 5532 | Location: dayton ohio | Registered: Jul 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
"The best time to look at a room is the day after you've had a party because you see the way people used the space."


An excellent point. Rooms that are set up so perfectly might be pretty to look at but not at all functional.

One trend I never understood was karate chopped pillows. Throw pillows in general can be overdone too. The make a nice addition of colour on a sofa or chair, but unless they are there for comfort, they are just a nuisance.
 
Posts: 487 | Registered: Mar 04, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There's DIY and there's D-I-Why, and I think we all know the difference when we see it.

Mary MacDonald is my idol. But, she also has the attention span of a hummingbird, if you've ever seen Million Dollar Decorators. And, that is why she is so over Hollywood Regency, for the time being at least.

As for granite, the great Darryl Carter has it in his kitchen, and that's good enough for me. Smile
 
Posts: 5162 | Registered: Jul 12, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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O.K., I'm really not trying to be a grouch here,but editorials about in/out good/bad always seem to be a way for each designers own style agenda to be espouced. I love a good chuckle,and I'm not above a little design trash talk now and then, but I don't care for design directives.

("This room screams puce!" Uhh... rooms don't "scream" anything.)

In this day and age I seem to be the last designer who still likes an acurately researched period room. I refuse to believe that eclectism is the only way to show you have taste and style.

I will agree that the moniker "Hollywood Regency" which used to mean 1930's neoclassic modern now means any old reproduction with a coat of paint on it, but what's wrong with a whole room of anything you like?
 
Posts: 1734 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also always find these lists interesting but seldom agree with all. I'm also sure without looking at the list of those designers I wouldn't have a few of them decorate my home as I wouldn't like their style so their opinions may not be valid for me.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Books as Props - I like old books and have bought a few to use as props. I think they are useful as risers or as a particular color accent and an inexpensive accessory. Old books also have a patina that adds something to one's decor.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Midcentury Modernism Overload
Antiques dealer Richard Shapiro urges decorators to embrace a more eclectic approach and draw from multiple styles and time periods.

While I agree with the statement it's not surprising that an antiques dealer would suggest this! LOL

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hollywood Regency
Decorator Mary McDonald is ready to say good riddance to brightly colored lacquered Hollywood Regency pieces: "I think we all have seen enough garage-sale junk sprayed in high-gloss Skittles colors to last through the next century."

Wow, she makes them sound so unattractive. I think brightly painted furniture (my preference is for lower gloss) often adds a great energy to a room. It's also inexpensive which many of us appreciate and gives a room an originality it might otherwise not have.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dysfunctional Decoration

I agree that most of the time function takes precedence over form for me altho a few non-functional things are often interesting.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

DIY Mania

IMO DIY can be good or bad but when good is definitely to be commended. However it doesn't cost enough to be encouraged by designers whose livlihood depends on encouraging consumption.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

About drop cloths - About 30 years ago I bought several drop cloths that were made with pieces of varying weights of unbleached cotton sewn together. I washed them several times then spent hours taking them apart. I used the heavier weight fabric as a floor length round tablecloth with colored heavy piping on the edges. The medium weight pieces I stenciled and either framed or used as pillow covers. I also dyed some pieces for other decor items. I used the lightest weight fabric for a peasant blouse and a few other things. So IMO not all drop cloths are created equal and can be a good source of very inexpensive fabric.


quote:
Originally posted by SusanBradfordKent:
One trend I never understood was karate chopped pillows. Throw pillows in general can be overdone too. The make a nice addition of colour on a sofa or chair, but unless they are there for comfort, they are just a nuisance.


I agree, karate chopped pillows as well as too many are definitely an affectation IMO.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: joyluck,


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12587 | Location: north of 50 in Canada | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
......what's wrong with a whole room of anything you like?


NOTHING Charles D!! Cool And I also find that there's comfort to come home and think of the stories behind the pieces in my home. There are stories behind everything in my house - a day spent w/ someone, my favorite aunt, my grandmother, my grandpa's favorite chair....

And their stuff doesn't need to look exactly like it did back in the day.


~~~becca~~~~


 
Posts: 5532 | Location: dayton ohio | Registered: Jul 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Like I said in the original message,
quote:
I make no claim to agree or disagree, I just find the topic interesting.


I'm sure if you interviewed any of AD's 100 top designers of 2013, you would get 100 different opinions about what is and isn't bad trend...or a good trend, for that matter.

Once again, Charles said it best, "what's wrong with a whole room of anything you like?"

And for the record Charles, you are not the last designer who still likes an accurately researched period room, but designers like you are few and far between. Sometimes, not always, eclectic is just another way of saying hodge-podge.
 
Posts: 783 | Registered: Jul 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sometimes, not always, eclectic is just another way of saying hodge-podge.[/QUOTE]

Thanks! I just had my first good laugh of the day. Can you imagine telling someone their room is very "hodge-podge" or "mish-mash"? Smile
 
Posts: 419 | Location: Illinois | Registered: May 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I intend to start saying my house is "hodge podge" at once! It sounds so much more homey than "eclectic"!!!!!
 
Posts: 3234 | Location: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sms29s66:
I intend to start saying my house is "hodge podge" at once! It sounds so much more homey than "eclectic"!!!!!


Big Grin
 
Posts: 487 | Registered: Mar 04, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I wrote a long post.. trigger word... oh well... we can have all the SPAM we want on the board but NO trigger words... can't think of what...?? In my experience, it goes 'poof' not to reappear again... I have the notepad version that I copied and pasted onto here. But can't find the offending words...

I will go over it later and try and condense or change some words... sigh...

I came BACK to re-post the L O N G post.. perhaps it was too long? I had time to really think through the other comments and had time to add to it... you will see * where I thought might have caused the 'flagging' of my post... and NOW I see it could have been JUST THE SHEER SIZE OF IT!!!! LOL

*

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Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I will try my post again in small amounts and see if I can get it on here.

Books as props: I happen to like this, and don't care if it is out of style. I am also gathering a few other 'lifts' for my accessories. I think 'all on the table' is a bit boring for me personally.

I lived with this 'midcentury modern' look and had clients with this type of high end furniture (at the time) and Teak and Walnut were in... but no one knew how to or did apply oil it to keep it from looking worn and faded over time. I got a huge hug from a woman in Virginia for identifying her high-end (inherited so she was not aware of what it was) and hated the grayed look of it. I got oil and oiled one piece of furniture (and end table) and it 'came to life'! BUT as for me... I got an OVERLOAD back then, and still get that feeling even when I see it done well. It is just way to cold for me personally.

Holywood Regency: I saw a few spaces done well IRL. AND... it was mostly done in the Feminine sense. It does not DIY well. We are inundated with the West Palm Beach Regency look here on CL and many stores and consignement shops feature it. I have owned some and gladly passed it on. I think the 'Skittles colors' are a great way to do teen and flashy personalities without too much expense. A lot of Victorian pieces do look good in bright colors too for FUN and youthful spaces.
 
Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dys*functional Decoration: I remember when the HUGE chandeliers came out, DH wanted one over our dining table for 'FUN'. I po*o po*oed it and won out... TG. The chandy would have been wider than the table... AND the crystals were larger than my wine glasses! NO WAY! I think in the right scale there is no issue, but in average builder homes... NO. Gives a feeling of confusion in the space spatially anyway.

DIY Mania: The Pallet stuff made me cringe the moment I saw it... besides all the obvious haz*ards (pests, chemicals they are treated with and lousy wood, or it would NOT have become a pallet in the first place) odor and f*umes). I can't wait till I have seen the last of that phase... I thought Crate furniture was the bottom.. till this craze came along.

The DIY phase, I do not think is on its way out yet. There are so many products out there that pay for someone to advertise (Blogs) by making things. And we do have an abundance of 'overstock' in used accessory and furniture items in this country. This phase's upside: The DIYer can gradutate up to better projects. AND there is something to be learned by doing and joy by sharing with your friends. So, there is an upside that won't be given up so easily. We all LOVE being creative and LOVE getting praise for it. AND if it can be done inexpensively, someone will do it!

jaysmom,
I hear you! It is the individual who puts priorities where they want them. A G*ambler would not spend on necessities if he had money to bet with scenerio... We ALL spend where our LOVE is... They say people put their money where their heart is. That is why commercials try to get us on our weak (things we love and like) points and try and get our dollars.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Mary Ruth,
 
Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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out on a limb,
I have walked through many a high end kitchen while working in the field. And most times I found that the Granite is TOO BUSY and ruins the flow of the eye as you look around the kitchen cabinets. And then to put a busy backsplash too.... nuff said.

SusanBradfordKent,
I so agree about people's use of space. That is why a model or staged home is so obvious in photos! And wallpaper book photos of rooms and furniture displays... no human factor in there.

In MY HOME, I am constantly looking at our motions, do we walk too far often to get a needed item? Where does clutter collect? And is there enough storage to put away items where we use them.... and enough room for the function of that space?

CharlesD,
You are right, I always try and get the source of the information and decide if it is useable for me. Even design information from one College to another for ID education can vary enough to cause an arg*ument between two top designers! That clash makes for heated riva*lry! That is why you see Professionals peddling their own philosophy... because there is NEVER just ONE theory for anything!

We need to believe in a structure system to create a business (make our business statement and plan) so this is true with ANY profession.
I am NOT of that mindset either to trash any room for any space is useful when inside a home... (as long as the room is not sitting in the middle of a field with no electricity, roof, or place to prepare meals, meaning camping out...). AND someone is funding the designing stage, someone OWNS that space... THEY provided the money, it is their prerogative to do it as THEY please and LOL I do not have to live there.

Even IF you didn't know anything about decorating, and you did your OWN place, spent millions .... SOMEONE would come along and want to photograph it purely for the budget and SCALE of the project!
Case in point: Michael Jack*son estate, E*lvis, Qu*een of Versailles (watch movie... hummm interesting take on human behavior who has no idea what to do with money). Any sports star who buys a mansion or two...movie stars... you get the idea.

AS for DROP CLOTH fabric... I LOVE IT! Once the (linen looking one) cloth has been washed about 3 times and fabric softener added, really looks textured like old nubby linen which we all know is very expensive.
I plan on using it for a few projects in the house. Smile
 
Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great answers. It's interesting to read everyone's take on this topic. I don't agree with everything in the article but the final comment I do agree with.

"...it is it's overuse, misuse or poorly executed use that gets designers' goats... You can have too much of a good thing."

That being said, if too much of a good thing is what you like, by all means go for it! Bottom line, everyone should decorate in a way that enhances their lifestyle and corresponds with their taste and budget.
 
Posts: 783 | Registered: Jul 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi Cavin,
I agree. Why do we worry? Most of us won't be published! LOL UNLESS we post on a blog, then EVERYONE has a comment about our style! LOL
 
Posts: 9525 | Location: East Space Coast, Florida zone 9B | Registered: Feb 11, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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omg..i must be way ahead of my time,lol..for years i've been suggesting people watch old movies for certain looks...(just looked up hollywood regency)

for those who live(ed) in hollywood would say seedy apts, lackluster ordinary furniture, was the norm...for those lucky enough to have a house, it was often the ca bungalo...they're all over in the "poorer' parts...nothing like the "posher" homes found in the hollywood hills and a few choice streets...it's amazing how dreams and studio sets have created a "trend"...
 
Posts: 8479 | Location: se mi | Registered: Sep 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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